Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service

The Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service (Welsh: Gwasanaeth Tân ac Achub Canolbarth a Gorllewin Cymru) is the fire and rescue service covering the Welsh principal areas of Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion, Neath Port Talbot, Pembrokeshire, Powys and Swansea.

Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service
Mid and West Wales Fire and Rescue Service badge.jpg

Mid & Weast Wales FRS area.png
Operational area
CountryWales
RegionMid & West Wales
Agency overview
Established1996 (1996)
Employees1,400
Chief Fire OfficerChris Davies
Facilities and equipment
Stations58
Website
www.mawwfire.gov.uk Edit this at Wikidata

The service was created in 1996 by the Local Government (Wales) Act 1994 which reformed Welsh local government. It was created by a merger of the earlier Dyfed, Powys and West Glamorgan fire brigades.[1]

The service is the largest by area in England and Wales,[2] covering a predominantly rural area of 4,500 square miles (11,700 km2) and the third largest in the United Kingdom behind the Scottish and Northern Ireland fire services. It has 57 fire stations, and around 1,400 staff.

Since October 2017, the service has shared its control room with South Wales Fire and Rescue Service and South Wales Police at the police headquarters,[3] an arrangement that is expected to save £1 million annually across both fire and rescue services.[4]

The fire authority which administers the service is a joint-board, made up of councillors appointed from Carmarthenshire, Ceredigion, Neath Port Talbot, Pembrokeshire, Powys and Swansea councils.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ About us Archived 2007-02-20 at the Wayback Machine From official website
  2. ^ Station location map Archived 2007-02-23 at the Wayback Machine From official website
  3. ^ "The South Wales Tri-Service Public Service and Joint Emergency Control Centre Tri-Service Centre Evaluation". Cardiff University. 14 May 2018. Retrieved 19 April 2021.
  4. ^ "National Framework for Fire and Rescue Services – Progress Report 2019" (PDF). Welsh Government. Retrieved 19 April 2021.

External linksEdit