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Michael Wiedenkeller (born 10 January 1963) is a Swedish-Luxembourgian chess International Master.

Michael Wiedenkeller
MichaelWiedenkeller12.jpg
Michael Wiedenkeller at the 40th Chess Olympiad, Istanbul 2012
Country Sweden
 Luxembourg
Born (1963-01-10) 10 January 1963 (age 56)
TitleInternational Master (1984)
FIDE rating2461 (June 2019)
Peak rating2479 (August 2013)

Wiedenkeller won the 1985/86 Rilton Cup in Stockholm.[1] In 1990, he won the Swedish Chess Championship.[2] In 1999, he tied for second with Vlastimil Jansa in the Donne Haas Memorial in Luxembourg.[3]

Wiedenkeller transferred from the Swedish Chess Federation to the Luxembourg Chess Federation in 2010.[4] Before he switched federations, he had already won the Luxembourg Chess Championship off-contest in 2009 and 2010; afterwards, he won it again in 2012 and 2013.[5] He played for Luxembourg in the 2010, 2012 and 2014 Chess Olympiads.[6]

In 2014, Wiedenkeller won the inaugural European Small Nations Individual Championship (FIDE Zone 1.10 Championship) in Larnaca, Cyprus. This achievement earned him one of the five FIDE president's nominations for the Chess World Cup 2015.[7][8][9] He was knocked out in the first round by Levon Aronian.

In 2015, Wiedenkeller helped the Luxembourg team win the 4th European Small Nations Team Chess Championship in Saint Peter Port, Guernsey scoring 7 points from 8 games on the second board.[10][11]

According to Chessmetrics, at his peak in October 1984 Wiedenkeller's play was equivalent to a rating of 2589, and he was ranked number 159 in the world. His best single performance was at Eksjö 1983, where he scored 4.5 of 5 possible points (90%) against 2488-rated opposition, for a performance rating of 2626.[12]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "History". Rilton Cup (in Swedish). Retrieved 7 January 2016.
  2. ^ "Svenska mästare" (in Swedish). Swedish Chess Federation. Retrieved 26 November 2009.
  3. ^ Crowther, Mark (11 October 1999). "TWIC 257: Donne Haas Memorial". The Week in Chess. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  4. ^ Player transfers in 2010. FIDE.
  5. ^ "Championnats nationaux individuels". Cercle des Échecs Dudelange. Retrieved 24 September 2016.
  6. ^ Men's Chess Olympiads: Michael Wiedenkeller. OlimpBase.
  7. ^ "1st European Small Nations Individual Championship". Cyprus Chess Federation. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  8. ^ "Michael Wiedenkeller wins FIDE Zone (1.10) Championship". Chessdom. 2014-05-01. Retrieved 2015-08-19.
  9. ^ "Participants of the World Cup 2015". bakuworldcup2015.com. Archived from the original on 2015-08-21. Retrieved 2015-08-19.
  10. ^ "Luxembourg wins European Small Nations Team Championship 2015". European Chess Union. 2015-04-28. Retrieved 2015-08-15.
  11. ^ 4th European Small Nations Team Championship. Chess-Results.com.
  12. ^ Sonas, Jeff. "Event Details: Eksjo, 1983". Chessmetrics. Retrieved 26 November 2009.

External linksEdit