Marylebone (UK Parliament constituency)

Marylebone was a parliamentary constituency in Middlesex, England from 1832 to 1885. The parliamentary borough formed part of the built up area of London, and returned two members to the House of Commons of the UK Parliament and was created under the Reform Act 1832. It was abolished by the Redistribution of Seats Act, 1885 which split it into 8 seats.

Marylebone
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Map
The London urban seats including new, 1832, ones taking parts of Middlesex, Surrey and West Kent. Akin to the Metropolitan Board of Works Area (after 1889 the mainstay of the County of London)
18321885
Number of memberstwo
Replaced byMarylebone East, Marylebone West, Paddington North, Paddington South, St Pancras East, St Pancras North, St Pancras South and St Pancras West
Created fromMiddlesex

BoundariesEdit

 
Marylebone in the Metropolitan area, showing boundaries used from 1868 to 1885.

Marylebone was one of five parliamentary boroughs in the metropolitan area of London enfranchised in 1832.[1] The constituency was defined as consisting of three civil parishes in Middlesex:[2]

The commissioners appointed to fix parliamentary boundaries recommended that the part of St Pancras parish north of the Regent's Canal should not form part of the constituency and should remain in the parliamentary county of Middlesex as this was still a largely rural area.[3] The inhabitants of St. Pancras, however, petitioned parliament for the inclusion of the entire parish, and this was accepted.[4]

In 1885 the entity was split into eight new single-member divisions. These were Marylebone East, Marylebone West, Paddington North, Paddington South, St. Pancras East, St. Pancras North, St. Pancras South and St. Pancras West.

Members of ParliamentEdit

Election First member First party Second member Second party
1832 Edward Portman Whig[5][6][7] Sir William Horne Whig[5]
1833 by-election Sir Samuel Whalley 1 Radical[5][7][8]
1835 Sir Henry Bulwer Whig[5]
1837 Sir Benjamin Hall, Bt Whig[5][9]
1838 by-election Charles Shore 2 Conservative[5]
1841 Sir Charles Napier Radical[10][11][12]
1847 Lord Dudley Stuart Whig[13][14]
1854 by-election Hugh Fortescue Whig[15]
February 1859 by-election Edwin James Radical[16]
1859 Liberal Liberal
July 1859 by-election Edmond Roche 2 Liberal
1861 by-election Harvey Lewis Liberal
1865 Sir Thomas Chambers Liberal
1874 William Forsyth Conservative
1880 Daniel Grant Liberal
1885 constituency abolished

Notes

  • 1 Election of Whalley in 1837 declared void on petition, as he could not prove his eligibility.
  • 2 A peer of Ireland.

ElectionsEdit

Turnout, in multi-member elections, is estimated by dividing the number of votes by two. To the extent that electors did not use both their votes, the figure given will be an underestimate.

Change is calculated for individual candidates, when a party had more than one candidate in an election or the previous one. When a party had only one candidate in an election and the previous one change is calculated for the party vote.

Elections in the 1830sEdit

General election 1832: Marylebone (2 seats)[5][17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Edward Portman 4,317 39.1 N/A
Whig William Horne 3,320 30.0 N/A
Radical Samuel Whalley 2,165 19.6 N/A
Chartist Thomas Murphy 913 8.3 N/A
Radical Leslie Grove Jones 316 2.9 N/A
Majority 1,135 10.4 N/A
Turnout 6,076 68.3 N/A
Registered electors 8,901
Whig win (new seat)
Whig win (new seat)

Portsman resigned by accepting the office of Steward of the Chiltern Hundreds, causing a by-election.

By-election, 20 March 1833: Marylebone[5][17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Radical Samuel Whalley 2,869 48.7 +26.2
Tory Henry Thomas Hope 2,055 34.9 New
Whig Charles Murray 791 13.4 −55.7
Chartist Thomas Murphy 172 2.9 −5.4
Majority 814 13.8 N/A
Turnout 5,887 66.1 −2.2
Registered electors 8,901
Radical gain from Whig Swing +41.0

† Murray was the government-approved candidate, but withdrew from the contest prior to the completion of polling.[18][19]

General election 1835: Marylebone (2 seats)[5][17][20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Radical Samuel Whalley 2,956 37.1 +17.5
Whig Henry Bulwer 2,781 34.9 +4.2
Whig William Horne 1,862 23.3 −6.7
Radical Gilbert Ainslie Young 378 4.7 +1.8
Turnout 5,000 64.5 −3.8
Registered electors 7,752
Majority 175 2.2 N/A
Radical gain from Whig Swing +9.4
Majority 919 11.6 +1.2
Whig hold Swing −2.7
General election 1837: Marylebone (2 seats)[5][17][20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Benjamin Hall 3,512 31.2 −3.7
Radical Samuel Whalley 3,350 29.8 −7.3
Conservative Charles Shore 2,952 26.3 New
Radical Gilbert Ainslie Young 764 6.8 +2.1
Whig William Horne 662 5.9 −17.4
Turnout 7,057 65.1 +0.6
Registered electors 10,843
Majority 162 1.5 −10.0
Whig hold Swing −0.6
Majority 398 3.5 +1.3
Radical hold Swing +1.6

Whalley's election was declared void on petition, due to him having insufficient estate to qualify, causing a by-election.

By-election, 3 March 1838: Marylebone[5][17][20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Charles Shore 4,166 51.3 +25.0
Whig William Ewart 3,762 46.4 +9.3
Radical Thomas Perronet Thompson 186 2.3 −34.5
Majority 404 4.9 N/A
Turnout 8,114 68.8 +3.7
Registered electors 11,799
Conservative gain from Radical Swing +29.7

Elections in the 1840sEdit

General election 1841: Marylebone[5][17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Benjamin Hall 4,661 28.9 −8.2
Radical Charles Napier 4,587 28.5 −8.1
Conservative Benjamin Bond Cabbell[21] 3,410 21.2 +8.1
Conservative James John Hamilton 3,383 21.0 +7.9
Chartist William Villiers Sankey[22][23] 61 0.4 N/A
Turnout 8,234 71.2 +6.1
Registered electors 11,570
Majority 74 0.5 −0.9
Whig hold Swing −8.1
Majority 1,177 7.3 +3.8
Radical hold Swing −8.1
General election 1847: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Dudley Stuart 5,367 35.7 N/A
Whig Benjamin Hall 5,343 35.5 +6.6
Conservative James John Hamilton 3,677 24.4 +3.2
Radical William Shee[24] 662 4.4 −24.1
Chartist Robert Owen[25] 1 0.0 −0.4
Majority 1,666 11.1 +10.6
Turnout 7,525 (est) 48.0 (est) −23.2
Registered electors 15,662
Whig hold Swing N/A
Whig gain from Radical Swing +15.4

Elections in the 1850sEdit

General election 1852: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Benjamin Hall Unopposed
Whig Dudley Stuart Unopposed
Registered electors 19,710
Whig hold
Whig hold

Hall was appointed President of the General Board of Health, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 16 August 1854: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Benjamin Hall Unopposed
Whig hold

Stuart's death caused a by-election.

By-election, 20 December 1854: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Hugh Fortescue 6,919 62.4 N/A
Whig Jacob Bell 4,166 37.6 N/A
Majority 2,753 24.8 N/A
Turnout 11,085 55.7 N/A
Registered electors 19,892
Whig hold

Hall was appointed First Commissioner of Works and Public Buildings, requiring a by-election.

By-election, 28 July 1855: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Benjamin Hall Unopposed
Whig hold
General election 1857: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Benjamin Hall Unopposed
Whig Hugh Fortescue Unopposed
Registered electors 20,851
Whig hold
Whig hold

Fortescue resigned after being called to the House of Lords via a writ of acceleration, causing a by-election.[26]

By-election, 25 February 1859: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Radical Edwin James 6,803 67.0 N/A
Radical Frederick Romilly[27][28] 3,354 33.0 N/A
Majority 3,449 34.0 N/A
Turnout 10,157 59.6 N/A
Registered electors 20,490
Radical gain from Whig
General election 1859: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Edwin James 5,029 46.6 N/A
Liberal Benjamin Hall 4,663 43.2 N/A
Conservative Edward Stanley 1,102 10.2 New
Majority 3,561 33.0 N/A
Turnout 5,948 (est) 29.0 (est) N/A
Registered electors 20,490
Liberal hold
Liberal hold

Hall succeeded to the peerage, becoming Lord Llanover and causing a by-election.

By-election, 7 July 1859: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Edmond Roche 4,219 55.4 N/A
Liberal William Lyon[29] 2,318 30.4 N/A
Liberal Lothian Sheffield Dickson 1,083 14.2 N/A
Majority 1,901 25.0 −8.0
Turnout 7,620 37.2 +8.2
Registered electors 20,490
Liberal hold

Elections in the 1860sEdit

James' resignation caused a by-election.

By-election, 19 April 1861: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Harvey Lewis 5,269 51.1 N/A
Conservative Robert Carden 2,612 25.3 +15.1
Liberal George Wingrove Cooke[30] 2,369 23.0 N/A
Liberal John Clark Marshman 65 0.6 N/A
Liberal Harper Twelvetrees[31] 1 0.0 N/A
Majority 2,657 25.8 −7.2
Turnout 10,316 49.1 +20.1
Registered electors 21,022
Liberal hold Swing N/A
General election 1865: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Harvey Lewis 7,159 40.3 N/A
Liberal Thomas Chambers 6,488 36.5 N/A
Liberal Edmond Roche 4,121 23.2 N/A
Majority 2,367 13.3 −19.7
Turnout 8,884 (est) 37.7 (est) +4.7
Registered electors 23,588
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
General election 1868: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Harvey Lewis 9,782 29.8 −10.5
Liberal Thomas Chambers 9,444 28.7 −7.8
Liberal Humphry Sandwith 5,591 17.0 N/A
Liberal Daniel Grant 4,058 12.3 N/A
Conservative Thomas Parkyns 3,989 12.1 New
Majority 3,853 11.7 −1.6
Turnout 18,427 (est) 51.8 (est) +14.1
Registered electors 35,575
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1870sEdit

General election 1874: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William Forsyth 9,849 37.5 +25.4
Liberal Thomas Chambers 8,251 31.4 +2.7
Liberal Daniel Grant 7,882 30.0 +17.7
Liberal Thomas Hughes 294 1.1 N/A
Majority 1,598 6.1 N/A
Turnout 18,063 (est) 58.8 (est) +7.0
Registered electors 30,740
Conservative gain from Liberal Swing +7.6
Liberal hold Swing −11.4

Elections in the 1880sEdit

General election 1880: Marylebone[17]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Daniel Grant 14,147 27.2 −2.8
Liberal Thomas Chambers 14,003 27.0 −4.4
Conservative Charles Allanson-Winn 11,890 22.9 +4.1
Conservative Frederick Seager Hunt 11,888 22.9 +4.1
Majority 2,113 4.1 N/A
Turnout 25,964 (est) 73.1 (est) N/A
Registered electors 35,535
Liberal gain from Conservative Swing −3.5
Liberal hold Swing −4.3
  • Constituency abolished (1885)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Representation of the People Act 1832 c.45 Sch.L
  2. ^ Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1832 c.64 Sch.O
  3. ^ Commissioners on Proposed Division of Counties and Boundaries of Boroughs (1832). Parliamentary representation: further return to an address to His Majesty, dated 12 December, 1831; for copies of instructions given by the Secretary of State for the Home department with reference to Parliamentary representation; likewise copies of letters of reports received by the Secretary of state for the Home department in answer to such instructions. London. p. 118.
  4. ^ "House of Commons Debates". Hansard 1803-2005. 12: c752. 8 May 1832. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Stooks Smith, Henry. (1973) [1844-1850]. Craig, F. W. S. (ed.). The Parliaments of England (2nd ed.). Chichester: Parliamentary Research Services. pp. 212–213. ISBN 0-900178-13-2.
  6. ^ Farrell, Stephen (2009). "PORTMAN, Edward Berkeley II (1799–1888), of Bryanston, Dorset". The History of Parliament. Retrieved 5 September 2019.
  7. ^ a b Maccoby, S. (2002). "Election Pledges IN 1832". English Radicalism: 1832–1852. London: Routledge. p. 68. ISBN 0-415-26573-8. Retrieved 5 September 2019 – via Google Books.
  8. ^ Churton, Edward (1838). The Assembled Commons or Parliamentary Biographer. p. 233. Retrieved 5 September 2019 – via Google Books.
  9. ^ The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History and Politics of the Year ..., Volume 83. J.G. & F. Rivington. 1842. p. 65. Retrieved 4 April 2018 – via Google Books.
  10. ^ "The General Election". Hampshire Telegraph. 3 July 1852. p. 6. Retrieved 13 May 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  11. ^ "London Electoral History — Steps Towards Democracy: 6.3 History of Elections in Marylebone, 1837–1841" (PDF). London Electoral History 1700-1850. Newcastle University. p. 4. Retrieved 13 May 2018.
  12. ^ Hawkins, Angus (2007). "Colonies and Corn Laws: 1841-1845". The Forgotten Prime Minister: The 14th Earl of Derby. Volume I: Ascent: 1799-1851. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 237. ISBN 978-0-19-920440-3. Retrieved 13 May 2018 – via Google Books.
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  15. ^ Sanders, Lloyd Charles (1912). "Fortescue, Hugh" . Dictionary of National Biography (2nd supplement). London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  16. ^ Steele, E. D. (1991). "At home". Palmerston and Liberalism, 1855-1865. Cambridge University Press. p. 100. ISBN 9780521400459. Retrieved 4 April 2018 – via Google Books.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. pp. 14–15. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.
  18. ^ "Mr Murray Resigns". The Times. 19 March 1833. p. 5.
  19. ^ Brooke, James Williamson (1839). The Democrats of Marylebone. London: William Jones Cleaver. pp. 144–145 – via Google Books.
  20. ^ a b c "History of Elections in Marylebone, 1837–1841" (PDF). London Electoral History 1700–1850. Newcastle University. p. 2. Retrieved 5 September 2019.
  21. ^ "The Political Examiner". 26 June 1841. pp. 1–4. Retrieved 23 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  22. ^ "The Scotsman". 23 June 1841. p. 3. Retrieved 23 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  23. ^ "Marylebone". Northern Warder and General Advertiser for the Counties of Fife, Perth and Forfar. 6 July 1841. p. 2. Retrieved 23 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  24. ^ "The General Election". Morning Post. 31 July 1847. pp. 2–4. Retrieved 23 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  25. ^ "This Day". Globe. 31 July 1847. p. 2. Retrieved 23 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  26. ^ Matthew, H.C.G. (2004). "Oxford DNB article: Fortescue, Hugh". Oxford University Press (subscription needed). Retrieved 23 November 2008.
  27. ^ "The Nomination". Bell's Weekly Messenger. 26 February 1859. p. 6. Retrieved 4 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  28. ^ "County Intelligence". Dover Express. 19 February 1859. p. 4. Retrieved 4 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  29. ^ "Marylebone Election". Marylebone Mercury. 2 July 1859. p. 1. Retrieved 4 April 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  30. ^ "The Times and the Marylebone Election". Dunfermline Saturday Press. Fife. 20 April 1861. p. 3. Retrieved 2 March 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  31. ^ "Marylebone Election". London Evening Standard. 18 April 1861. pp. 5–6. Retrieved 2 March 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  • Boundaries of Parliamentary Constituencies 1885-1972, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Parliamentary Reference Publications 1972)
  • British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885, compiled and edited by F.W.S. Craig (Macmillan Press 1977)
  • Who's Who of British Members of Parliament: Volume I 1832-1885, edited by M. Stenton (The Harvester Press 1976)
  • Who's Who of British Members of Parliament, Volume II 1886-1918, edited by M. Stenton and S. Lees (Harvester Press 1978)
  • The Times, 8th Dec. 1884; p. 13.
  • Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "M" (part 1)

External linksEdit