List of people hanged, drawn and quartered

The execution of Hugh Despenser the Younger, as pictured in the Froissart of Louis of Gruuthuse

To be hanged, drawn and quartered was a penalty in England and the United Kingdom for several crimes, but mainly for high treason. This method was abolished in England in 1870.

Date executed Name Notes
1283 Dafydd ap Gruffydd The last independent ruler of Wales, and the first prominent person to be executed in this manner[1]
1305-08-23 William Wallace Treason in the Wars of Scottish Independence
1323 Andrew Harclay, 1st Earl of Carlisle Treason in the Wars of Scottish Independence[2]
1326-11-24 Hugh Despenser the Younger For sodomy; contemporary accounts differ on whether he died from the full sentence of being hanged, drawn, and quartered[citation needed]
1381-07-04 Thomas Baker (Peasants' Revolt leader) Aftermath of the 1381 Peasants' Revolt[3][4]
1381-07-15 John Ball Aftermath of the 1381 Peasants' Revolt[5]
1381-1382 John Buk Aftermath of the 1381 Peasants' Revolt[6]
1381–1382 Richard de Leycester Aftermath of the 1381 Peasants' Revolt[7]
1382-05-6 John Wrawe Aftermath of the 1381 Peasants' Revolt[8]
1388 Thomas Usk Accused of misleading King Richard II[9]
1400 Thomas Blount Executed for plotting the overthrow of Henry IV of England in the Epiphany Rising
1401 Llywelyn ap Gruffydd Fychan Allowed Owain Glyndŵr to escape capture, and therefore disemboweled and dismembered[10]
1404 John Cerle Killed the Duke of Gloucester and therefore Johannes Cerle was hanged, drawn, and quartered[11]
1539 Richard Whiting (abbot) The last Abbot of Glastonbury executed on Glastonbury Tor for treason, alongside two of his monks, John Thorne and Roger James who suffered the same fate.
1541 Francis Dereham Executed for "Succeeding the King in the Queen's affections" [12]
1554 Thomas Wyatt the younger Sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered for Wyatt's rebellion, but the sentence was commuted to beheading[13]
1554-05 William Thomas (scholar) Accused of planning to murder Mary I of England
1577 Cuthbert Mayne One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales executed under anti-Catholic laws[14][15]
1577 Edmund Campion One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales executed under anti-Catholic laws[14][15]
1581-12-01 Alexander Briant Catholic priest, one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales[16]
1586-09-20 Anthony Babington Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot[17]
1586-09-20 John Ballard (Jesuit) Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot[18]
1586-09-20 Chidiock Tichborne Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot
1586-09-20 Henry Donn Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot
1586-09-20 Robert Barnewell Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot
1586-09-20 John Savage Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot
1586 Edward Havington Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot, part of the second group which was required by Elizabeth I to hang until "quite dead" before disemboweling and quartering after public outcry at the horror of the drawing and quartering of 20 September 1586[19]
1586 Charles Tilney Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot, hung until "quite dead" before disemboweling and quartering[20]
1586 Edward Jones Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot, hung until "quite dead" before disemboweling and quartering[21]
1586 John Charnock Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot, hung until "quite dead" before disemboweling and quartering[22]
1586 John Travers Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot, hung until "quite dead" before disemboweling and quartering[23]
1586 Jerome Bellamy Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot, hung until "quite dead" before disemboweling and quartering[24]
1586 Robert Gage Executed as one of many involved in the Babington plot, hung until "quite dead" before disemboweling and quartering[25]
1594-07-24 John Boste Catholic priest, one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales[26][27]
1595 Roderigo Lopez English doctor executed for allegedly poisoning Elizabeth I. Later believed to be innocent.
1606-01-30 Everard Digby For involvement in Gunpowder Plot
1606-01-30 Robert Wintour For involvement in Gunpowder Plot
1606-01-30 John Grant For involvement in Gunpowder Plot
1606-01-30 Thomas Bates For involvement in Gunpowder Plot
1606-01-31 Thomas Wintour For involvement in Gunpowder Plot
1606-01-31 Ambrose Rookwood For involvement in Gunpowder Plot
1606-01-31 Robert Keyes For involvement in Gunpowder Plot
1606-01-31 Guy Fawkes For involvement in Gunpowder Plot, but he managed to cheat the executioner by jumping from the scaffold while his head was in the noose, breaking his neck.[28][29] His lifeless body was nevertheless drawn and quartered,[30][31] and his body parts distributed to "the four corners of the kingdom".[32]
1628-08-28 Edmund Arrowsmith Catholic priest, one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales[33][34]
1641-09-10 Ambrose Barlow Catholic priest, one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales[35][36][37]
1643-05-30 George Bouchier For his activities in the English Civil War[38]
1643-05-30 Robert Yeamans For his activities in the English Civil War[39]
1646-06-30 Philip Powell For being a priest[40]
1653 Felim O'Neill of Kinard Executed for his part in the Irish Rebellion of 1641[41][42]
1654-06-28 John Southworth Cromwell ordered that surgeons sew the corpse back together so that it could be sent to Douai College for burial[43]
1658-07-07 Edward Ashton (colonel) For the plot against the Lord Protector set on foot by agents of Charles II in 1658, and for complicity in which Sir Henry Slingsby and John Hewet were executed[44]
1660-10-13 Col. Thomas Harrison For regicide of Charles I
1663 Thomas Oates Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot[45][46]
1663 Samuel Ellis Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 John Nettleton, sr. Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 John Nettleton, jr. Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 Robert Scott Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 William Tolson Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 John Forster Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 Robert Olroyd Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 John Asquith Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 Peregrine Corney Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 John Snowden Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 John Smith Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 William Ash Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 John Errington Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 Robert Atkins Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 William Colton Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 George Denham Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 Henry Watson Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 Richard Wilson Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 Ralph Rymer Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1663 Charles Carre Executed for participating in the Farnley Wood Plot
1685 over 200 Charged with treason following the Monmouth Rebellion, their remains were parboiled, tarred, and displayed on poles, trees and lampposts; only when James II conducted a progress through the area were they removed and buried[47]
1788-02-16 Robert Keon Hanged, drawn, and quartered for murder in a private quarrel[48]
1803-09-20 Robert Emmet Hanged and then beheaded once dead[49] for high treason in the Irish Rebellion of 1803[50][51][52]

ReferencesEdit

Notes
  1. ^ Rishanger, William, 1250?–1312? and Henry T. Riley, Willelmi Rishanger, Quondam Monachi S. Albani, Et Quorundam Anonymorum, Chronica Et Annales, Regnantibus Henrico Tertio Et Edwardo Primo, Rerum Britannicarum medii aevi scriptores (Rolls Series) 28.2, London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1865, p. 104 "David judicialiter condemnatus, tractus et suspensus est, visceribusque combustis, corpus capite truncatum, et in quatuor partes est divisum." (Also at Google Books)
  2. ^ Henry Thomas Riley, Thomae Walsingham, Quondam Monachi S. Albani, Historia Anglicana. London: Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, and Green, 1863, Vol 1. p. 169 [1] "Deinde tractus, suspensus, et in quartas divisus est; et partes quatuor principalibus civitatibus Angliae sunt transmissae; caput ejus super pontem Londoniarum fixum est, versus partes respiciens Scoticanas."
  3. ^ Aslet, Clive. "Fobbing" in Villages of Britain : The Five Hundred Villages That Made the Countryside. Bloomsbury, 2010.
  4. ^ Randal Bingley, Fobbing, Life and Landscape (Pheon Heritage in association with Thurrock Council Museum, 1997)
  5. ^ Prescott, Andrew (2008) [2004], "Ball, John (d. 1381)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.), Oxford University Press, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/1214, retrieved 22 August 2010 (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. ^ Powell, Edgar (1896). The Rising of 1381 in East Anglia. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. OCLC 1404665. p. 48 [2]
  7. ^ Powell, Edgar (1896). The Rising of 1381 in East Anglia. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. OCLC 1404665. p. 48 [3]
  8. ^ Powell, Edgar (1896). The Rising of 1381 in East Anglia. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. OCLC 1404665. p. 25 [4]
  9. ^ Waldron, Ronald (2008) [2004], "Usk, Thomas (c.1354–1388)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.), Oxford University Press, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/28030, retrieved 22 August 2010 (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  10. ^ Steffan, Rhobert ap (2006), Llywelyn Ap Gruffydd Fychan, bbc.co.uk, retrieved 22 August 2010
  11. ^ Haydon, Frank Scott, 1822–1887. Eulogium (historiarum Sive Temporis). London: Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, and Roberts, 1863. Vol 3 p. 402. [5]. "Johannes Cerle tractus, suspensus, et vivus depositus, et tandem ductus Londoniae tractus ibidem et suspensus demum decollatus est atque in quartas divisus."
  12. ^ Letters and Papers; Weir, Henry VIII, p. 454
  13. ^ Hamilton, Dakota L. (2005) [2004], "Thomas, William (d. 1554)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.), Oxford University Press, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/27242, retrieved 20 August 2010 (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  14. ^ a b Trudgian, Raymond Francis (2008) [2004], "Mayne, Cuthbert [St Cuthbert Mayne] (bap. 1544, d. 1577)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.), Oxford University Press, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/18440, retrieved 19 August 2010 (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  15. ^ a b Graves, Michael A. R. (2008) [2004], "Campion, Edmund [St Edmund Campion] (1540–1581)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.), Oxford University Press, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/4539, retrieved 19 August 2010 (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  16. ^ Simpson, Richard. Edmund Campion: A Biography. New ed., ed., J. Hodges, 1896. p. 457. url= https://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.$b55231?urlappend=%3Bseq=471
  17. ^ Francis Edwards, S.J., Plots and plotters in the reign of Elizabeth I. (Dublin: Four Courts, 2002), p. 164.
  18. ^ Holinshed 1808, pp. 915–916:

    John Ballard a preest, and first persuader of Babington to these odious treasons, was laid aloue vpon an hurdell, and six others two and two in like sort, all drawne from Tower hill through the citie of London, untu a field at the vpper end of Holborne, hard by the high waie side to saint Giles in the field, where was erected a scaffold for their execution, and a paire of gallows of extraordinarie hight ... and although the thousands were thought (and indeed so seemed) to be numberlesse: yet somewhat to note the huge multitude, there were by computation able men enow to giue battell to a strong enimie ... On the first daie the traitors were placed vpon the scaffold, that the one might behold the reward of his fellowes treason. Ballard the preest, who was the first brocher of this treason, was the first that was hanged, who being cut downe (according to judgement) was dismembred, his bellie ript up, his bowels and traitorous heart taken out and throwne into the fire, his head also (seuered from his shoulders) was set on a short stake vpon the top of the gallows, and the trunke of his bodie quartered and imbrued in his owne bloud, wherewith the executioners hands were bathed, and some of the standers by (but to their great loathing, as not able for their liues to auoid it, such was the throng) beesprinkled.

  19. ^ Francis Edwards, S.J., Plots and plotters in the reign of Elizabeth I. (Dublin: Four Courts, 2002), p. 164.
  20. ^ Francis Edwards, S.J., Plots and plotters in the reign of Elizabeth I. (Dublin: Four Courts, 2002), p. 164.
  21. ^ Francis Edwards, S.J., Plots and plotters in the reign of Elizabeth I. (Dublin: Four Courts, 2002), p. 164.
  22. ^ Francis Edwards, S.J., Plots and plotters in the reign of Elizabeth I. (Dublin: Four Courts, 2002), p. 164.
  23. ^ Francis Edwards, S.J., Plots and plotters in the reign of Elizabeth I. (Dublin: Four Courts, 2002), p. 164.
  24. ^ Francis Edwards, S.J., Plots and plotters in the reign of Elizabeth I. (Dublin: Four Courts, 2002), p. 164.
  25. ^ Francis Edwards, S.J., Plots and plotters in the reign of Elizabeth I. (Dublin: Four Courts, 2002), p. 164.
  26. ^ "The Pursuit of John Boste", Catholic Records Society, 1908
  27. ^ Duffy, Patrick. "The Forty Martyrs of England and Wales", Catholic Ireland
  28. ^ Northcote Parkinson 1976, pp. 91–92
  29. ^ Fraser 2005, pp. 283
  30. ^ Allen 1973, p. 37
  31. ^ Thompson 2008, p. 102
  32. ^ Guy Fawkes, York Museums Trust, retrieved 16 May 2010
  33. ^ Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
  34. ^ "The Lancaster priest executed for his zeal", Catholic Herald, 26 August 2010
  35. ^ Camm, Bede (1907). "Ven. Edward Ambrose Barlow". The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 2. New York: Robert Appleton. Retrieved 10 September 2013.
  36. ^ "Blessed Ambrose Barlow, O.S.B." St Ambrose Barlow Website. Archived from the original on 4 August 2003. Retrieved 10 September 2013.
  37. ^ Tyldesley, PJ. "Sir Thomas Tyldesley 1612–1651". Tyldesley Family History. Retrieved 13 December 2008.
  38. ^   This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainCooper, Thompson (1886). "Bouchier, George". In Stephen, Leslie (ed.). Dictionary of National Biography. 6. London: Smith, Elder & Co. p. 4.
  39. ^   This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainPollard, Albert Frederick (1900). "Yeamans, Robert". In Lee, Sidney (ed.). Dictionary of National Biography. 63. London: Smith, Elder & Co. p. 68.
  40. ^   This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Ven. Philip Powel". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  41. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/ashorthistory/archive/intro99.shtml
  42. ^ http://www.libraryireland.com/biography/SirFelimONeill.php
  43. ^ Morrill, John (2004), "Southworth, John [St John Southworth] (1592–1654)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.), Oxford University Press, doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/67460, retrieved 19 August 2010 (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  44. ^ Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1885). "Ashton, Edward" . Dictionary of National Biography. 2. London: Smith, Elder & Co.
  45. ^ Drake, Francis. Eboracum : Or, the History and Antiquities of the City of York, from Its Origin to This Time. Together with an Account of the Ainsty, or County of the Same, and a Description and History of the Cathedral Church, from Its First Foundation to the Present Year. Illustrated with Seventeen Copper-Plates. in Two Volumes. Printed for T. Wilson and R. Spence, High-Ousegate, 1788, vol 1. p. 60. [6]
  46. ^ Hopper, Andrew (June 2002), "The Farnley Wood Plot and the Memory of the Civil Wars in Yorkshire", The Historical Journal, Cambridge University Press, hosted at jstor.org, 45 (2): 281, &nbsp, 296–297, doi:10.1017/s0018246x02002406, JSTOR 3133646
  47. ^ Zook 1999, p. 141
  48. ^ James Kelly "'That Damn'd Thing Called Honour'" Cork University Press 1995 pp194-196
  49. ^ "Irish Historical Mysteries: The Grave of Robert Emmet". Retrieved 7 May 2013.
  50. ^ Brooke-Tyrrell, Alma (1983). "Focus on Thomas Street". Dublin Historical Record. 36 (3): 107–117. JSTOR 30100607.
  51. ^ Dawson, T. (1971). "Between the Steps". Dublin Historical Record. 24 (3): 65–75. JSTOR 30103977.
  52. ^ Cobbett, William; Jardine, David (1820). "Cobbett's complete collection of state trials and proceedings for high treason: And other crimes and misdemeanor from the earliest period to the present time ... From the ninth year of the reign of King Henry, the Second, A.D.1163, to ... \George IV, A.D.1820]". Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
Bibliography