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List of Kansas Jayhawks head football coaches

Current Head Coach, Les Miles

The Kansas Jayhawks football program is a college football team that represents the University of Kansas in the Big 12 Conference in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The current coach is Les Miles. The team has had 39 head coaches and two interim head coaches since it started playing organized football in 1890 with the nickname Jayhawks.[1] The team played its first season without a head coach. Kansas joined the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association in 1907. After several changes, the conference eventually became the Big Eight Conference. The Jayhawks became a charter member of the Big 12 in 1996 when the Big Eight disbanded.[2] Seven coaches have led Kansas to postseason bowl games: George Sauer, Jack Mitchell, Pepper Rodgers, Don Fambrough, Bud Moore, Glen Mason and Mark Mangino. Four coaches have won conference championships with the Jayhawks: A. R. Kennedy, Bill Hargiss, Sauer and Rodgers.

Mason is the all-time leader in games coached (102), and is tied with Mitchell for most years coached with nine. Kennedy is the all-time leader in total wins with 52. Fielding H. Yost has the highest winning percentage of any Jayhawk coach with a 10–0 record (1.000) his only year. Of coaches who served more than one season, Wylie G. Woodruff leads with a .833 winning percentage, barely edging out Kennedy's winning percentage of .831. David Beaty is, in terms of winning percentage, the worst coach the Jayhawks have had (.125). Of the 39 Kansas coaches, Yost is the only one that has been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach. Mangino won several coach of the year accolades after the 2007 season, the only Jayhawks coach to do so.

Contents

KeyEdit

CoachesEdit

Statistics correct as of the end of the 2018 season
# Name Term GC W L T % CW CL CT C% BW BL CC Awards and other notes
1 Edwin Mortimer Hopkins 1891 8 7 0 1 .938
2 A. W. Shepard 1892–1893 15 9 6 0 .600
3 Hector Cowan[5] 1894–1896 23 15 7 1 .674
4 Wylie G. Woodruff 1897–1898 18 15 3 0 .833
5 Fielding H. Yost[6] 1899 10 10 0 0 1.000
6 Larry Boynton 1900 9 2 5 2 .333
7 John H. Outland[7] 1901 10 3 5 2 .400
8 Arthur Hale Curtis 1902 10 6 4 0 .600
9 Harrison Weeks 1903 9 6 3 0 .667 Fired for having a sexual relationship with a KU freshman girl. He was 24 at the time.[8]
10 A. R. Kennedy 1904–1910 65 52 9 4 .831 9 3 1 .731 1 Forced out by conference rule change requiring coaches to be full-time faculty members.[9]
11 Ralph W. Sherwin 1911 8 4 2 2 .625 1 1 1 .500 0
12 Arthur Mosse 1912–1913 16 9 7 0 .563 4 4 0 .500 0
13 H. M. Wheaton 1914 8 5 2 1 .688 2 2 0 .500 0
14 Herman Olcott 1915–1917 24 16 7 1 .688 7 4 1 .625 0
15 Jay Bond 1918 4 2 2 0 .500
16 Leon McCarty 1919 8 3 2 3 .563 1 1 1 .500 0
17 Phog Allen 1920 8 5 2 1 .688 3 2 0 .600 0
18 Potsy Clark 1921–1925 39 16 17 6 .487 11 15 6 .438 0
19 Frank Cappon 1926–1927 16 5 10 1 .344 4 8 1 .346 0
20 Bill Hargiss 1928–1932 42 22 18 2 .548 8 11 1 .425 1
21 Adrian Lindsey[A 4] 1932–1938 61 23 30 8 .443 11 18 5 .397 0
22 Gwinn Henry 1939–1942 36 9 27 0 .250 4 16 0 .200 0
23 Henry Shenk 1943–1945 30 11 16 3 .417 4 10 1 .300 0
24 George Sauer 1946–1947 21 15 3 3 .786 8 1 1 .850 0 1 2 Accepted Navy job[10]
25 Jules V. Sikes 1948–1953 60 35 25 0 .583 18 18 0 .500 0
26 Chuck Mather 1954–1957 40 11 26 3 .313 7 16 1 .313 0
27 Jack Mitchell 1958–1966 91 42 44 5 .489 29 28 4 .508 1 0 0
28 Pepper Rodgers 1967–1970 42 20 22 0 .476 13 15 0 .464 0 1 1 Accepted UCLA job[11]
29 Don Fambrough 1971–1974, 1979–1982 90 37 48 5 .439 20 33 3 .384 0 1 0
30 Bud Moore 1975–1978 45 17 21 1 .449 8 19 1 .304 0 1 0
31 Mike Gottfried 1983–1985 34 15 18 1 .456 8 13 0 .381 0 Accepted Pittsburgh job[12]
32 Bob Valesente 1986–1987 22 4 17 1 .205 0 13 1 .036 0
33 Glen Mason 1988–1996 102 47 54 1 .466 25 38 1 .398 2 0 0 Accepted Minnesota job[13]
34 Terry Allen 1997–2001 53 20 33 0 .377 10 30 0 .250 0 Terminated after eight games of 2001 season.
Int Tom Hayes[A 5] 2001 3 1 2 0 .333 0 2 0 .000 0
35 Mark Mangino 2002–2009 98 50 48 0 .510 23 41 0 .359 3 1 0

Big 12 Coach of the Year (2007)[15]
Walter Camp Coach of the Year (2007)[16]
AP National Coach of the Year (2007)[17]
Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year (2007)[18]
The Home Depot Coach of the Year Award (2007)[19]
Sporting News College Football Coach of the Year (2007)[20]
Woody Hayes Trophy (2007)[21]
George Munger Award (2007)[22]
AFCA Coach of the Year (2007)[23]
Paul "Bear" Bryant Award (2007)[21]

Resigned following the launch of an investigation of his coaching practices.[24]

36 Turner Gill 2010–2011 24 5 19 0 .208 1 16 0 .059 0 0 0
37 Charlie Weis 2012–2014 27 5 22 0 .185 1 18 0 .053 0 0 0 Fired 4 games into the 2014 season
Int Clint Bowen 2014 8 1 7 0 .125 1 7 0 .125 0 0 0 Interim Head Coach after Charlie Weis was fired
38 David Beaty 2015–2018 48 6 42 0 .125 2 34 0 .056 0 0 0 Fired after the end of the 2018 season
39 Les Miles 2019–present 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Gallery of coachesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Kansas did not join a conference until 1907.
  2. ^ Overtime was introduced in 1996, which eliminated ties.[3]
  3. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[4]
  4. ^ Adrian Lindsey took over for Bill Hargiss midway through the 1932 season.
  5. ^ Tom Hayes was named the interim head coach after Terry Allen was fired in November 2001.[14]

ReferencesEdit

General
  • "Kansas Jayhawks Coaching Records". College Football Data Warehouse. Archived from the original on February 16, 2010. Retrieved March 5, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  • "Kansas Jayhawks Football 2009 Media Guide" (PDF). Kansas Athletics, Inc. Retrieved March 5, 2010.
Specific
  1. ^ "Traditions: Evolution of the Jayhawk". University of Kansas Athletic Department. Archived from the original on March 10, 2010. Retrieved March 10, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. ^ "The Big 12 Conference – Outstanding Success". Big12Sports.com. July 18, 2008. Retrieved March 10, 2010.
  3. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  4. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big Plays Help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  5. ^ "Hector "Hec" Cowan". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved February 26, 2016.
  6. ^ "Fielding "Hurry Up" Yost". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved March 9, 2010.
  7. ^ "John Outland". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved February 26, 2016.
  8. ^ "The Day They Almost Abolished Football". kuhistory.com. Archived from the original on September 23, 2013. Retrieved July 4, 2013. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  9. ^ staff writers (April 16, 1910). "HAMMER FELL; Conference at Kansas City Yesterday Agreed to Retain Football But They Made Many Restraints". Lawrence Daily Journal.
  10. ^ "Navy Football History Database". nationalchamps.net. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  11. ^ "UCLA Football Database". nationalchamps.net. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  12. ^ "Pittsburg Football Database". nationalchamps.net. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  13. ^ "Minnesota Football Database". nationalchamps.net. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  14. ^ Sinclair, Robert (November 5, 2001). "End of the road". Lawrence Journal-World. Lawrence, Kansas. p. 1C. Retrieved May 4, 2010.
  15. ^ "Football Notes: November 28, 2007". The University Daily Kansan. November 28, 2007. Archived from the original on March 10, 2010. Retrieved March 10, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  16. ^ "Walter Camp Football Foundation Awards". Walter Camp Football Foundation, Inc. Archived from the original on March 10, 2010. Retrieved September 27, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  17. ^ Wood, Ryan (December 19, 2007). "Mangino named AP National Coach of the Year". Lawrence Journal-World. Archived from the original on March 10, 2010. Retrieved March 10, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  18. ^ "Kansas' Mangino Wins 2007 Eddie Robinson Award" (Press release). Football Writers Association of America. January 4, 2008. Archived from the original on March 10, 2010. Retrieved March 10, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  19. ^ Fusco, Asher (December 7, 2007). "Mangino earns coach of the year award". The University Daily Kansan. Archived from the original on March 10, 2010. Retrieved March 10, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  20. ^ "Sporting News names McFadden its college player of the year". ESPN. The Associated Press. December 7, 2007. Archived from the original on March 10, 2010. Retrieved March 10, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  21. ^ a b "Mangino Earns Coach Of The Year Honor From Peers". University of Kansas Athletic Department. January 10, 2008. Archived from the original on March 10, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  22. ^ "George Munger Award". Maxwell Football Club. Archived from the original on March 10, 2010. Retrieved March 10, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  23. ^ "AFCA Coach of the Year Award – Past Winners". American Football Coaches Association. January 19, 2010. Archived from the original on December 5, 2010. Retrieved March 10, 2010. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  24. ^ "Mangino out at Kansas". ESPN. Retrieved July 4, 2013.