Lin Mei-chu

Lin Mei-chu (Chinese: 林美珠; pinyin: Lín Měizhū) is a Taiwanese politician. She was the Minister of Labor from 8 February 2017 until 22 February 2018.

Lin Mei-chu
林美珠
勞動部長林美珠.jpg
Minister of Labor of the Republic of China
In office
8 February 2017 – 26 February 2018
DeputyLiau Huei-fang
Preceded byKuo Fang-yu
Succeeded byHsu Ming-chun
Minister of Mongolian and Tibetan Affairs Commission of the Republic of China
In office
20 May 2016 – 8 February 2017
Preceded byJaclyn Tsai
Succeeded byHsu Jan-yau[1]
Minister without Portfolio
In office
20 May 2016 – 8 February 2017
Deputy Magistrate of Chiayi County
In office
2010–2014
MagistrateHelen Chang
Political Deputy Minister of the Interior of the Republic of China
In office
2006–2008
MinisterLee I-yang
Personal details
Born1953 (1953) (age 68)
NationalityRepublic of China
Alma materNational Chengchi University

EducationEdit

Lin obtained her bachelor's and master's degrees in law from National Chengchi University in 1976 and 1982, respectively.[2]

Political careerEdit

She was appointed to head the Mongolian and Tibetan Affairs Commission in April 2016.[3] Lin stated in June, shortly after taking office on 20 May 2016, that she preferred handing over the MTAC's functions to other government agencies.[4][5]

In February 2017, she replaced Kuo Fang-yu as minister of labor.[6] On 22 February 2018, she tendered her resignation from the ministry, citing health reasons. She was replaced by Deputy Minister Su Li-chiung.[7]

Lin was named chair of the Taiwan Asset Management Corporation on 13 December 2018. The next day, she announced her resignation.[8]

PersonalEdit

Lin and ROC President Tsai Ing-wen are cousins.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "New agriculture, health, labor and science ministers sworn in". Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Republic of China. 9 February 2017. Retrieved 13 February 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Executive Yuan, R.O.C. (Taiwan)". Archived from the original on 2016-05-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Premier-designate finalizes his Cabinet lineup". Central News Agency.
  4. ^ Lee, I-Chia (21 June 2016). "Mongolian-Tibetan commission might be merged: minister". Taipei Times. Retrieved 21 June 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Wu, Hsin-yun; Kao, Evelyn (20 June 2016). "Minister makes pitch to retain operations of obscure agency". Central News Agency. Retrieved 21 June 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Shen, Worthy; Yu, Hsiao-han; Chang, Ming-hsun; Huang, Li-yun; Kao, Evelyn (8 February 2017). "Four new ministers sworn in". Central News Agency. Retrieved 9 February 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Chuan, Ku; Chen, Christie (22 February 2018). "Taiwan to replace its labor minister with a deputy: source". Focus Taiwan. Retrieved 23 February 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Lin, Meng-ju; Kao, Evelyn (13 December 2018). "Taiwan Asset Management Corp. chair resigns amid cronyism accusations". Retrieved 13 December 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Taiwan names first ministers in new Cabinet". Straits Times. 9 April 2016. Retrieved 21 June 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)