Lambeth (UK Parliament constituency)

Lambeth was a constituency 1832—1885 loosely equivalent in area to the later administrative units: the London Borough of Lambeth and the south-west and centre of the London Borough of Southwark. It returned two members of parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons of the UK Parliament by the bloc vote version of the first-past-the-post system.

Lambeth
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
CountyGreater London
18321885
Number of membersTwo
Replaced byBrixton, Camberwell North, Dulwich, Kennington, Lambeth North, Newington West, Norwood and Peckham, Newington Walworth
Created fromSurrey

HistoryEdit

 
Lambeth in the Metropolitan area, showing boundaries used from 1868 to 1885.

The constituency was among many created under the Great Reform Act (for the 1832 general election) and abolished by the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 for the 1885 general election when it was divided into eight single-member seats: Camberwell North, Camberwell Peckham, Lambeth Brixton, Lambeth Kennington, Lambeth North, Lambeth Norwood, Newington Walworth and Newington West.[1]

BoundariesEdit

Under original proposals it would have been greater, taking all of Dulwich and Brixton and possibly two parishes to the east. The commissioners appointed to fix parliamentary boundaries attempted to equalise the seven new "metropolitan" constituencies of London in number of voters and in population. For this reason Bermondsey and Rotherhithe were assigned to Southwark. It was also decided not to include the entirety of the parishes of Camberwell and Lambeth: both were very large parishes running five or six miles south from the Thames. The portions closest to the river were heavily built up, but the southern sections were mainly rural. Dulwich and part of Brixton were therefore excluded, instead forming part of East Surrey.[2]

The boundaries were detailed in the schedules of the Parliamentary Boundaries Act 1832, and consisted of:

The area was unchanged when parliamentary seats were next redistributed under the Reform Act 1867.[1]

Members of ParliamentEdit

Election 1st Member 1st Party 2nd Member 2nd Party
1832 Charles Tennyson d'Eyncourt Whig[4][5][6] Benjamin Hawes Whig[5][6]
1847 Charles Pearson Radical[7][6]
1850 by-election William Williams Radical[8][9]
1852 William Arthur Wilkinson Radical[10]
1857 William Roupell[11] Radical[12]
1859 Liberal Liberal
1862 by-election Frederick Doulton[13] Liberal
1865 by-election James Lawrence Liberal
1865 Thomas Hughes Liberal
1868 Sir James Lawrence Liberal Sir William McArthur Liberal
1885 constituency abolished: see Brixton, Camberwell North, Dulwich, Kennington, Lambeth North, Newington West, Norwood and Peckham, Newington Walworth

Election resultsEdit

Elections in the 1830sEdit

General election 1832: Lambeth (2 seats)[14][5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Charles Tennyson 2,716 46.4 N/A
Whig Benjamin Hawes 2,166 37.0 N/A
Radical Daniel Wakefield 819 14.0 N/A
Radical John Moore 155 2.6 N/A
Majority 1,347 23.0 N/A
Turnout 3,220 67.5 N/A
Registered electors 4,768
Whig win (new seat)
Whig win (new seat)
General election 1835: Lambeth (2 seats)[14][5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Benjamin Hawes 2,008 40.7 +3.7
Whig Charles Tennyson 1,995 40.4 −6.0
Conservative Charles Farebrother 931 18.9 New
Majority 1,064 21.6 −1.4
Turnout 2,890 65.2 −2.3
Registered electors 4,435
Whig hold Swing N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
General election 1837: Lambeth (2 seats)[14][5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Benjamin Hawes 2,934 39.8 −0.9
Whig Charles Tennyson d'Eyncourt 2,811 38.1 −2.3
Conservative Charles Baldwin 1,624 22.0 +3.1
Majority 1,187 16.1 −5.5
Turnout 4,497 63.9 −1.3
Registered electors 7,040
Whig hold Swing −1.2
Whig hold Swing −1.9

Elections in the 1840sEdit

General election 1841: Lambeth (2 seats)[14][5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Whig Benjamin Hawes 2,601 29.1 −10.7
Whig Charles Tennyson d'Eyncourt 2,568 28.8 −9.3
Conservative Charles Baldwin 1,999 22.4 +11.4
Conservative Thomas Cabbell 1,763 19.7 +8.7
Majority 569 6.4 −9.7
Turnout 4,466 (est) 57.8 (est) −6.1
Registered electors 7,731
Whig hold Swing −10.4
Whig hold Swing −9.7
General election 1847: Lambeth (2 seats)[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical Charles Pearson 4,614 39.6 New
Whig Charles Tennyson d'Eyncourt 3,708 31.8 +3.0
Whig Benjamin Hawes 3,344 28.7 −0.4
Turnout 5,833 (est) 42.0 (est) −15.8
Registered electors 13,885
Majority 906 7.8 N/A
Radical gain from Whig Swing N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1850sEdit

Pearson resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 7 August 1850: Lambeth[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical William Williams 3,834 68.5 N/A
Radical Charles Napier[15] 1,182 21.1 N/A
Radical John Hinde Palmer[16] 585 10.4 N/A
Majority 2,652 47.4 +39.4
Turnout 5,601 34.4 −7.6
Registered electors 16,284
Radical hold Swing N/A
General election 1852: Lambeth (2 seats)[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical William Arthur Wilkinson 4,752 37.7 +18.9
Radical William Williams 4,022 31.9 +12.1
Whig Charles Tennyson d'Eyncourt 3,829 30.4 −30.1
Majority 193 1.5 −6.3
Turnout 8,216 (est) 45.3 (est) +3.3
Registered electors 18,131
Radical hold Swing +17.0
Radical gain from Whig Swing +13.6
General election 1857: Lambeth (2 seats)[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Radical William Roupell 9,318 46.1 N/A
Radical William Williams 7,648 37.9 +6.0
Radical William Arthur Wilkinson 3,234 16.1 −21.6
Majority 4,414 21.9 +20.4
Turnout 10,100 (est) 49.8 (est) +4.5
Registered electors 20,276
Radical hold Swing N/A
Radical hold Swing N/A
General election 1859: Lambeth (2 seats)[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal William Roupell Unopposed
Liberal William Williams Unopposed
Registered electors 21,737
Liberal hold
Liberal hold

Elections in the 1860sEdit

Roupell resigned, causing a by-election.

By-election, 5 May 1862: Lambeth[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Frederick Doulton 5,124 82.3 N/A
Conservative William Sleigh 754 12.1 New
Liberal William Arthur Wilkinson 347 5.6 N/A
Majority 4,370 70.2 N/A
Turnout 6,225 26.4 N/A
Registered electors 23,542
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Williams' death caused a by-election.

By-election, 9 May 1865: Lambeth[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal James Lawrence Unopposed
Liberal hold
General election 1865: Lambeth (2 seats)[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Thomas Hughes 6,373 35.6 N/A
Liberal Frederick Doulton 6,280 35.1 N/A
Liberal James Lawrence 4,743 26.5 N/A
Conservative James Haig 514 2.9 N/A
Majority 1,537 8.6 N/A
Turnout 11,584 (est) 41.7 (est) N/A
Registered electors 27,754
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
General election 1868: Lambeth (2 seats)[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal James Lawrence 15,051 41.1 +14.6
Liberal William McArthur 14,553 39.7 N/A
Conservative John Morgan Howard 7,043 19.2 +16.3
Majority 7,510 20.5 +11.9
Turnout 21,845 (est) 65.4 (est) +23.7
Registered electors 33,377
Liberal hold Swing +3.2
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Election in the 1870sEdit

General election 1874: Lambeth (2 seats)[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal James Lawrence 12,175 34.6 −6.5
Liberal William McArthur 11,788 33.5 −6.2
Conservative John Morgan Howard 11,201 31.9 +12.7
Majority 587 1.7 −18.8
Turnout 23,183 (est) 57.8 (est) −7.6
Registered electors 40,103
Liberal hold Swing −6.4
Liberal hold Swing −6.3

Election in the 1880sEdit

General election 1880: Lambeth (2 seats)[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal James Lawrence 19,315 35.1 +0.5
Liberal William McArthur 18,983 34.5 +1.0
Conservative John Morgan Howard 16,701 30.4 -1.5
Majority 2,282 4.1 +2.4
Turnout 36,016 (est) 71.3 (est) +13.5
Registered electors 50,541
Liberal hold Swing +0.6
Liberal hold Swing +0.9

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Electoral areas in the parliamentary boroughs in Surrey". Surrey County Council. Archived from the original on 6 September 2012. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  2. ^ Commissioners on Proposed Division of Counties and Boundaries of Boroughs (1832). Parliamentary representation: further return to an address to His Majesty, dated 12 December, 1831; for copies of instructions given by the Secretary of State for the Home department with reference to Parliamentary representation; likewise copies of letters of reports received by the Secretary of state for the Home department in answer to such instructions. London. pp. 125–126.
  3. ^ "From the Point at which the Road from London to Dulwich by Red Post Hill leaves the Road from London over Herne Hill in a straight Line to Saint Matthews Church at Brixton; thence in a straight Line to a Point in the Boundary between the respective Parishes of Lambeth and Clapham One hundred and fifty Yards South of the Middle of the Carriageway along Acre Lane." Britain, Great (1832). The statutes of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol.72. London. p. 360. Retrieved 12 August 2012.
  4. ^ Mosse, Richard B (1838). The Parliamentary Guide: a concise history of the Members of both Houses, etc. p. 160. Retrieved 29 March 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Stooks Smith, Henry (1845). The Parliaments of England, from 1st George I., to the Present Time. Vol II: Oxfordshire to Wales Inclusive. London: Simpkin, Marshall, & Co. p. 68. Retrieved 22 October 2018 – via Google Books.
  6. ^ a b c "General Election". Windsor and Eton Express. 31 July 1847. p. 2. Retrieved 22 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  7. ^ "Norfolk Chronicle". 7 August 1847. p. 2. Retrieved 22 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  8. ^ "Latest Intelligence". Gloucester Journal. 10 August 1850. p. 3. Retrieved 22 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  9. ^ "Imperial Parliament". Exeter and Plymouth Gazette. 10 August 1850. p. 8. Retrieved 22 October 2018 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  10. ^ Cobden, Richard (2010). Howe, Anthony (ed.). The Letters of Richard Cobden: Volume II: 1848-1853. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 83. ISBN 9780199211968. Retrieved 29 March 2018.
  11. ^ Resigned 4 February 1862 (Harris (2001) p.119)
  12. ^ Beckett, Ian F. W. (2007). Riflemen Form: A Study of the Rifle Volunteer Movement 1859-1908. Pen and Sword. p. 144. ISBN 9781844156122.
  13. ^ Elected byelection 5 May 1862 (Harris (2001) p.119)
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Craig, F. W. S., ed. (1977). British Parliamentary Election Results 1832-1885 (e-book)|format= requires |url= (help) (1st ed.). London: Macmillan Press. pp. 12–13. ISBN 978-1-349-02349-3.
  15. ^ Thomas, Joseph (2010). The Universal Dictionary of Biography and Mythology: Iac - Pro. Cosimo, Inc. p. 653. ISBN 9781616400736. Retrieved 29 March 2018 – via Google Books.
  16. ^ Griffin, Ben (2012). The Politics of Gender in Victorian Britain: Masculinity, Political Culture and the Struggle for Women's Rights. Cambridge University Press. p. 93. ISBN 9781107015074. Retrieved 29 March 2018 – via Google Books.

BibliographyEdit