Kyōko Kagawa

Kyōko Kagawa (香川 京子, Kagawa Kyōko, born 5 December 1931) is a Japanese actress. During her 70 years spanning career,[2] she has worked with directors like Akira Kurosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi, Yasujirō Ozu and Mikio Naruse, appearing in films such as Tokyo Story, Sansho the Bailiff, The Bad Sleep Well, Mothra and High and Low.

Kyōko Kagawa
香川 京子
Kagawa Kyoko 1954.JPG
Kyōko Kagawa in 1954
Born
Kyoko Ikebe (池辺 香子)[1]

(1931-12-05) 5 December 1931 (age 90)
Asō (currently Namegata), Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan
Other namesKyoko Makino (牧野 香子)
OccupationActress
Years active1950–present

BiographyEdit

Kagawa was born in Asō (currently Namegata), Ibaraki Prefecture,[1] and graduated from Tokyo Metropolitan Tenth High School for Girls in 1949.[3] She was discovered in the "New Face Nomination" contest run by the Tokyo Shimbun in 1949[1] and gave her film debut the following year in Mado kara tobidase.[2] She regularly appeared in films by Akira Kusosawa, Kenji Mizoguchi, Yasujirō Ozu, Mikio Naruse, Shirō Toyoda, Hiroshi Shimizu and others.

Kagawa married in 1963 and followed her husband, a newspaper reporter, to New York City.[1] After her return from the US, she acted in television dramas until she appeared again on the big screen in Satsuo Yamamoto's Karei-naru ichizoku (1974).[1]

In 2011, the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, honored her long career and contribution to Japanese cinema with an exhibition dedicated to her.[4]

Selected filmographyEdit

FilmsEdit

 
Kyōko Kagawa in Tokyo Heroine (1950)

TelevisionEdit

HonoursEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "香川京子". Kinenote (in Japanese). Retrieved 4 November 2022.
  2. ^ a b "香川京子". Japanese Movie Database (in Japanese). Retrieved 17 June 2009.
  3. ^ "香川京子". Kotobank (in Japanese). Retrieved 4 November 2022.
  4. ^ Hamilton, Mike (2 September 2011). "Kyoko Kagawa retrospective looks back at Japan's golden age of cinema". The Japan Times. Retrieved 4 November 2022.
  5. ^ "田中絹代賞とは". Tanaka Kinuyo Memorial Association. Retrieved March 16, 2021.
  6. ^ "FIAF-Award". Fédération Internationale des Archives du Film. Retrieved 5 November 2022.

External linksEdit

  Media related to Kyōko Kagawa at Wikimedia Commons