Kurdistan Eyalet

Kurdistan Eyalet (Ottoman Turkish: Eyâlet-i Kurdistan) was an eyalet of the Ottoman Empire. It was the first time that the Ottoman Empire used the term "Kurdistan" to refer to an administrative unit rather than a geographical region. It was formed with the aim of establishing direct control over Kurdistan, rather than recognizing it as a political entity.[1] It was a short-lived province as it only lasted about 21 years, between 1846 and 1867.[2] This time was marked by the lack of a powerful Kurdish ruler in the region. It led to the rise of the religious sheikhs belonging to the Naqshbandi and Qadiriyya dervish orders, or tariqas. It was formed after Bedir Khan Beg was defeated and sent to Istanbul.[1] Initially the eyalet covered the region of the former Kurdish Emirate of Bohtan, but it was expanded gradually[3] and at its widest extension included the former Diyarbekir Eyalet and the areas around Van, Hakkari and Muş, as well as the districts of Botan, Mardin, and Cizre. According to the salnames between 1847 and 1867, it was ruled by the central Ottoman government and received annual funding of 80,000 piastres,[4] considerably more than the Mosul Eyalet.[5] In 1867 it was abolished and succeeded by the Diyarbekir Vilayet.[6] During its existence, it saw twelve different governors who had either the title of müsir or vizier.[7]

Kurdistan Eyalet
1846–1867
CapitalDiyarbakır
History 
• Established
1846
• Disestablished
1867
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Diyarbakır Eyalet
Diyarbekir Vilayet
Today part of Turkey

ReferencesEdit


  1. ^ a b Yadirgi, Veli (3 August 2017). The Political Economy of the Kurds of Turkey. ISBN 9781107181236.
  2. ^ Özoğlu, Hakan (2004). Kurdish Notables and the Ottoman State: Evolving Identities, Competing Loyalties, and Shifting Boundaries. SUNY Press. pp. 60–63. ISBN 978-0-7914-5993-5.
  3. ^ Özoğlu, Hakan (2004), pp.61–62
  4. ^ Özök-Gündogan, Nilay (2012). Jorngerden, Joost; Verheij, Jelle (eds.). Social Relations in Ottoman Diyarbekir, 1870-1915. Brill. p. 186. ISBN 9789004225183.
  5. ^ Özoğlu, Hakan (2004), p.61
  6. ^ Aydın, Suavi; Verheij, Jelle (2012). Jorngerden, Joost; Verheij, Jelle (eds.). Social Relations in Ottoman Diyarbekir, 1870-1915. Brill. p. 18. ISBN 9789004225183.
  7. ^ Ozoglu, Hakan (2004-02-12). Kurdish Notables and the Ottoman State: Evolving Identities, Competing Loyalties, and Shifting Boundaries. SUNY Press. pp. 62–63. ISBN 978-0-7914-5993-5.