K-14 (Kansas highway)

K-14 is a 219.3-mile-long (352.9 km) north–south state highway which runs most of the length of the U.S. state of Kansas. The highway runs through the central part of the state. K-14's southern terminus is at U.S. Highway 160 (US-160) and K-2 in the city of Harper, and the northern terminus is a continuation as Nebraska Highway 14 (N-14) at the Nebraska border north of the City of Mankato.

K-14 marker

K-14
K-14 highlighted in red, K-14 Truck highlighted in blue
Route information
Maintained by KDOT
Length219.276 mi[1] (352.891 km)
Major junctions
South end US-160 / K-2 in Harper
 
North end N-14 at the Nebraska state line north of Mankato
Location
CountiesJewell, Mitchell, Lincoln, Ellsworth, Rice, Reno, Kingman, Harper
Highway system
  • Kansas State Highway System
K-13K-15

Route descriptionEdit

 
K-14 as it passes through Kingman

K-14 begins on its southern end at US-160 in the town of Harper in Harper County. From there, it travels north into Kingman County, crossing the Chikaskia River near the community of Rago. K-14 continues north to Kingman, where it crosses the South Fork of the Ninnescah River and meets US-54/US-400. K-14 travels east with US-54/US-400 for approximately 10 miles (16 km) before turning north again near Waterloo and continuing into Reno County, where it crosses the North Fork of the Ninnescah River. K-14 meets K-96 just south of South Hutchinson, and the two highways run concurrently for three miles (4.8 km), until they meet US-50 and K-61, where all four routes run concurrently for two miles (3.2 km) to the west, when K-14 and K-96 turn north and pass through Nickerson, and US-50 and K-61 continue west.

The two highways enter Rice County just south of Sterling before passing through the town. The highway then crosses the Arkansas River before encountering Lyons, and US-56, at which point K-96 splits from K-14 and continues west along US-56 toward Great Bend, while K-14 continues north into Ellsworth County. In the historic town of Ellsworth, the highway crosses the Smoky Hill River and continues north to Interstate 70 (I-70). K-14 travels east along I-70 for approximately two miles (3.2 km) before exiting and resuming north into Lincoln County, where K-14 passes through the Smoky Hills Wind Farm.

K-14 passes north through Lincoln and Mitchell counties, crossing the Saline River in the town of Lincoln and the Solomon River in Beloit (the largest town along the highway). The highway jogs to the west for close to two miles (3.2 km) at the Mitchell–Jewell county line before continuing north into Jewell County. K-14 passes through the town of Jewell and meets US-36 just east of Mankato. K-14 overlaps US-36 for three miles (4.8 km) as it heads east, before splitting off again to the north. K-14 passes over White Rock Creek at the far western end of Lovewell Reservoir and continues north into Nebraska near the town of Superior, Nebraska, where the highway continues as N-14.

The northern and southern halves of the highway differ fairly significantly in terms of terrain and landscape. The southern half of K-14 travels over fairly flat terrain in the valley of the Arkansas River. Just north of the intersection with K-4 in southern Ellsworth County, K-14 passes into the Smoky Hills region, traveling over a series of broad, rolling hills, providing several scenic vistas of the surrounding countryside. The portion of the highway between Lincoln and Beloit is particularly hilly.

HistoryEdit

In a September 9, 2009, resolution, K-14 was rerouted along K-61 from Arlington to Hutchinson then along K-96 from Hutchinson to the former end of the K-14/K-96 overlap.[2]

K-28 originally overlapped K-14 from K-28's current western terminus north to the southern end of the overlap with US-36, then continued west along US-36. Then on February 8, 1996, K-28 was truncated to K-14 in Jewell.[3][4][5]

Until 2013, K-14 followed US-54/US-400 west out of Kingman for four miles (6.4 km). From there it went north to K-61 and through Arlington and continued north, then met K-96 south of Sterling. In 2013, K-14 was realigned to the now defunct K-17, and K-11 took over a section of original K-14 alignment from US-54/US-400 north to K-61.[6]

Junction listEdit

All exits are unnumbered.

CountyLocationmi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
HarperHarper0.0000.000   US-160 / K-2 – Anthony, WellingtonSouthern terminus; highway continues as US-160 west/K-2 south (former K-14 south)
KingmanRago12.50620.126  K-42 – Wichita
Kingman26.16242.104   US-54 / US-400 west (D Avenue) – PrattSouthern end of US-54/US-400 overlap; former K-14 north
29.90948.13440th AvenueInterchange; southern end of freeway
30.61749.27370th Avenue
36.32158.453   US-54 / US-400 east – WichitaNorthern end of US-54/US-400 overlap ; orthern end of overlap with freeway
Reno57.45992.471  K-96 east – WichitaSouthern end of K-96 overlap
South Hutchinson60.18496.857    US-50 east / K-61 north (John Neal Memorial Highway) / Main Street orth – Newton, McPhersoneastern end of US-50/K-61 overlap Interchange; east end of expressway section;; access to Hutchinson Regional Medical Center
61.69699.290   US-50 west / K-61 south (John Neal Memorial Highway) – Kinsley, PrattWestern end of US-50/K-61 overlap; partial cloverleaf interchange; west end of expressway section, south end of super two; former K-14 south
63.402102.0366th Avenue
65.084104.7434th Avenue
67.606108.801Wilson Road / Nickerson Boulevard
50th AvenueDirt road; north end of super two
RiceLyons94.319151.792   US-56 / K-96 west (Main Street) – Great Bend, McPhersonNorthern end of K-96 overlap
105.895170.421  K-4 – Hoisington, Lindsborg
Ellsworth120.214193.466  
   K-14 Truck north / K-156 – Great Bend
Southern end of K-14 Truck
Ellsworth122.347196.898  
    K-140 east / K-14 Truck south (15th Street)
Western end of K-140; northern end of K-14 Truck; serves Ellsworth County Medical Center
129.800208.893   I-70 / US-40 west – HaysSouthern end of I-70/US-40 overlap; exit 219 on I-70
132.713213.581   I-70 / US-40 east – SalinaNorthern end of I-70/US-40 overlap ; exit 221 on I-70
LincolnLincoln147.514237.401  K-18 – Plainville, Junction City
157.111252.846  K-284 east – BarnardWestern terminus of K-284
MitchellBeloit178.516287.294   US-24 / K-9 – Osborne, Clay Center
JewellJewell193.566311.514  K-28 east (Delaware Street) – ConcordiaWestern terminus of K-28
201.600324.444  US-36 west – MankatoSouthern end of US-36 overlap
204.053328.391  US-36 east – BellevilleNorthern end of US-36 overlap
219.276352.891  N-14 northContunuation into Nebraska
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

K-14 TruckEdit

 

 

K-14 Truck
LocationEllsworth
Length2.790 mi[1] (4.490 km)

K-14 Truck is a truck route in Ellsworth. From K-14, K-14 Truck follows K-156 east to K-140, then follows the latter west to end back at K-14.

Major junctions
The entire route is in Ellsworth, Ellsworth County.

mi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
0.0000.000   K-14 / K-156 westSouthern end of K-156 overlap
2.2953.693   K-140 east / K-156 eastSouthern end of K-140 overlap; northern end of K-156 overlap
2.7904.490   K-14 / K-140 eastNorthern end of K-140 overlap; western terminus of K-140
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d Kansas Department of Transportation (2016). "Pavement Management Information System". Kansas Department of Transportation. Retrieved April 21, 2017.
  2. ^ State Highway Commission of Kansas (September 9, 2009). "Resolution for Relocation and Redesignation of Roads in McPherson County". Vermillion: State Highway Commission of Kansas. Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  3. ^ Kansas Department of Transportation (February 8, 1996). "Resolution to Redesignate Highway K-28 and K-128 in Jewell County". Topeka: Kansas Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 1, 2019.
  4. ^ Bureau of Transportation Planning (1989). Jewell County (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. General Highway Map. Topeka: Kansas Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  5. ^ Bureau of Transportation Planning (2000). Jewell County (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. General Highway Map. Topeka: Kansas Department of Transportation. Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  6. ^ State Highway Commission of Kansas (December 2011). 2011-12 Kansas Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Kansas: State Highway Commission of Kansas. Retrieved August 6, 2019.

External linksEdit

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