Jurica Golemac

Jurica Golemac (born May 29, 1977) is a Croatian-born Slovenian professional basketball coach and former player. He currently serves as the head coach for Cedevita Olimpija of the Slovenian League, ABA League and the EuroCup.

Jurica Golemac
Jurica Golemac.jpg
Golemac playing for Slovenia in 2009
Cedevita Olimpija
PositionHead coach
LeagueSlovenian League
ABA League
EuroCup
Personal information
Born (1977-05-29) May 29, 1977 (age 44)
Klanjec, SR Croatia, Yugoslavia
NationalityCroatian
Listed height6.10 ft 10.25 in (2.12 m)
Listed weight225 lb (102 kg)
Career information
Playing career1996–2013
Coaching career2013–present
Career history
As player:
1995–1997Zrinjevac
1997–1998Union Olimpija (2nd team)
1998–1999Geoplin Slovan
1999–2002Union Olimpija
2002–2003Efes Pilsen
2003–2004Cibona
2004–2006Ural Great
2006–2007Hapoel Jerusalem
2007–2008Paris-Levallois
2008–2009Panellinios
2009Virtus Roma
2009Panathinaikos
2009–2010Alba Berlin
2010Zadar
2010–2011Colossus Rhodes
2011–2012Sidigas Avellino
2012–2013Krka
As coach:
2013–2015Cibona (assistant)
2016–2017Tajfun Šentjur
2016–2017Georgia (assistant)
2017–2019Koper Primorska
2020–presentCedevita Olimpija
Career highlights and awards
As player

As head coach

He is 2.09 m (6 ft 10¼ in) tall and weighs 102 kg (225 lbs). He can played at both the forward and center positions.

Professional careerEdit

In his professional career Golemac had played with the following clubs: Zrinjevac, Union Olimpija, Geoplin Slovan, Efes Pilsen, Cibona, Ural Great, Hapoel Jerusalem, Paris-Levallois, Panellinios, Virtus Roma, Panathinaikos, Zadar, Colossus Rhodes, Alba Berlin, Sidigas Avellino and Krka. He retired from playing professional basketball in January 2013 after knee injury.

Internationally, Golemac played for the senior Slovenian men's national team at the 2003, 2005 and at the 2009 EuroBasket tournaments.

Coaching careerEdit

Golemac started his coaching career as an assistant coach to Slaven Rimac at Cibona, in November 2013. The surprising victory at the 2013–14 ABA League final four in Belgrade[1][2] was followed by a string of bad results which resulted in Rimac and Golemac being sacked in December 2015.[3]

In 2016, Golemac was appointed the assistant coach of the Georgia national team and the head coach of Tajfun Šentjur of the Slovenian League.[4]

In May 2017, Golemac was named the head coach of Koper Primorska.[5] In his inaugural season with the club, Primorska won first trophies in its history, including the Slovenian Cup and Supercup. In 2019, Primorska managed to win the ABA League Second Division, being consequently promoted to the First Division. Besides this success, the club also won the first domestic league title, and the second domestic cup in the history.[6][7] On 20 December 2019, Golemac resigned from Koper Primorska.[8]

On January 27, 2020, Golemac was appointed the head coach of the Slovenian club Cedevita Olimpija, following the departure of his former colleague Slaven Rimac.[9]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Cibosi osvajači ABA Lige!!!" (in Croatian). KK Cibona. April 27, 2014. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  2. ^ "Cibona, konačno, šampion Jadrana!". Mondo.rs (in Serbian). April 27, 2014. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  3. ^ "Slaven Rimac više nije trener Cibone, klub ga je odlučio smijeniti". Večernji list (in Croatian). December 5, 2015. Retrieved May 26, 2019.
  4. ^ Perko, Drago (October 22, 2016). "Jurica Golemac novi trener Tajfuna!". Kosarka.si (in Slovenian). Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  5. ^ "Primorsko prevzel nekdanji as slovenske košarke". Siol.net (in Slovenian). May 26, 2017. Retrieved January 24, 2021.
  6. ^ "Sixt Primorska u prvom pokušaju osvojila slovenski Superkup". Basketball.hr (in Croatian). Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  7. ^ "Fešta v Kopru: Sixt Primorska prvič prvak". RTV Slovenija (in Slovenian). Retrieved May 25, 2019.
  8. ^ "Golemac više nije trener Primorske, preselio na funkciju savjetnika". Sportnet.rtl.hr (in Croatian). Retrieved December 21, 2019.
  9. ^ "Jurica Golemac znova pri Olimpiji, tokrat kot trener". RTV Slovenija (in Slovenian). January 27, 2020. Retrieved January 27, 2020.

External linksEdit