Jules Bailey

  (Redirected from Jules Kopel-Bailey)

Jules Bailey (born November, 1979)[1] is an American politician who served in the Oregon House of Representatives from 2009 to 2014, representing inner Southeast and Northeast Portland. Bailey also served on the County Commission for Multnomah County, Oregon from June 2014 to December 2016.[2] In 2016, Bailey ran for mayor of Portland in 2016, losing to Ted Wheeler.[3] In January 2017, he began working for the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative as the chief stewardship officer.[4]

Jules Bailey
Jules Bailey 2018.jpg
Multnomah County Commissioner
In office
June 9, 2014 – December 2016
Preceded byLiesl Wendt
Succeeded bySharon Meieran
ConstituencyDistrict 1
Member of the Oregon House of Representatives from the 42nd District
In office
January 2009 – May 2014
Preceded byDiane Rosenbaum
Succeeded byRob Nosse
Personal details
BornPortland, Oregon, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Alma materLewis & Clark College (BA)
Princeton University (MPAURP)
ProfessionBeverage industry employee
WebsiteOfficial website

Early life and educationEdit

Bailey was raised in Portland, Oregon and graduated from Lincoln High School. He earned a bachelor's degree in Lewis & Clark College and received MPA/URP from Princeton University[5]

Bailey studied in a dual-degree graduate program at Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. In 2007, he earned two master's degrees: a Master of Public Affairs (with concentrations in Economic Policy and Environmental Policy) and a Master of Urban and Regional Planning.[6][7]

CareerEdit

ElectionsEdit

In 2008, Bailey was elected to the Oregon House of Representatives to represent District 42. The seat was vacated by Diane Rosenbaum, who was running for election to the Oregon Senate. Bailey earned a plurality victory in the primary election over three other candidates for the Democratic nomination.[8][9] In the general election, he defeated Pacific Green Party candidate Chris Extine to win election to the seat.[10][11] Bailey was reelected to the Oregon House of Representatives in 2010 with 84.7% of the vote[12] and in 2012, when he was unopposed in both the primary and general elections.[13][14]

Policy issuesEdit

In the 2013–2014 legislative session, Bailey served as Chairman of the House Energy and Environment Committee.[15] He also chaired the Joint Committee on Tax Credits.

In 2013, Bailey angered some environmentalists by voting in favor of the Columbia River Crossing mega highway project, which was projected to increase greenhouse gas emissions 32% in the area by 2030 if built; he was presented with the mock environmental "Cars Rejuvenating Carbon" award during an Oregon League of Conservation Voters event shortly after the vote in the Oregon House.[16][17][18]

Bailey worked to encourage bicycle transportation. He sponsored bills to increase state funding for biking and walking facilities[19][20] and to allow an Idaho stop for cyclists.[21] He also sponsored a bill to make traffic fines proportional to vehicle weight in order to recognize that heavier vehicles, when driven dangerously, are more hazardous to the people around them than small vehicles.[22]

Multnomah County CommissionerEdit

From June 2014 to the end of 2016, Bailey represented District 1, which includes the areas of Multnomah County west of the Willamette River and inner Southeast Portland, on the Multnomah County Commission.[23][24] Bailey was elected to the Multnomah County Commission in a special election in May 2014.[25] He succeeded Liesl Wendt, who had been appointed to fill the seat on an interim basis when Deborah Kafoury resigned to run for County Chair.[26] Bailey defeated community activist Brian Wilson, winning 73.1% of the vote.[27] During his tenure on the Commission, Bailey focused on homelessness, easing the process of financing seismic and energy conservation upgrades to commercial buildings, and funding seismic resiliency upgrades for bridge infrastructure.[28][29][30]

Portland Mayoral CampaignEdit

See Also: 2016 Portland, Oregon mayoral election

In November 2015, Bailey announced his campaign for Portland mayor to take on Oregon State Treasurer Ted Wheeler.[31] Bailey won a progressive and populist campaign compared to Wheeler's moderate campaign.[32] Bailey voluntarily limited campaign contributions to $250.00, while Wheeler did not and was criticized for taking money from out of town sources.[33] Bailey ended up losing, coming in second place with 31,955 votes (16.6%) compared to Wheeler's 105,562 votes (54.7%).[34]

Personal lifeEdit

In September 2020, Bailey filed an elections complaint against a Portland mayoral candidate Sarah Iannarone alleging that she is misleading voters about her educational credentials.[35][36]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Schmidt, Brad (May 4, 2016). "Jules Bailey hopes green brand resonates with Portland's blue voters". The Oregonian.
  2. ^ "Commissioner Jules Bailey takes office". Multnomah County. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ E, Emily (September 9, 2016). "Multnomah County Commissioner Jules Bailey lines up new job for 2017". oregonlive.com. Retrieved May 11, 2019.
  4. ^ "OBRC Welcomes Jules Bailey to Bottle Bill Team". Retrieved January 22, 2018. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ House, Kelly (April 16, 2014). "Jules Bailey banks on legislative experience in pursuit of county post: Multnomah County District 1 election". oregonlive. Retrieved November 14, 2019.
  6. ^ "Jules Kopel Bailey". Project VoteSmart. Retrieved November 24, 2008. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ "Meet Jules Kopel-Bailey". JulesForOregon.com. Archived from the original on March 13, 2009. Retrieved November 24, 2008. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ "May 20, 2008 – Election Results". Multnomah County Elections Division. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ "Ore. House 42: Kopel-Bailey beats three other Democrats". OregonLive.com. May 20, 2008.
  10. ^ "Oregon Legislature Results". OregonLive.com. Retrieved November 24, 2008. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. ^ "November 4, 2008 – Election Results". Multnomah County Elections Division. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. ^ "November 2, 2010 – Election Results". Multnomah County Elections Division. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "May 15, 2012 Primary Election – Election Results". Multnomah County Elections Division. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. ^ "November 2012 General Election – Election Results". Multnomah County Elections Division. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ "Oregon legislators emboldened to wade into ballot measure politics, thanks to February session". The Oregonian. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. ^ Losier, Michael. "Rep. Jules Bailey receives award at OLCV event". Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved April 22, 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. ^ "If You Gaze For Long Into the CRC…". Retrieved April 23, 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. ^ Theriaul, Dennis. "Pro-CRC Lawmaker Given "Cars Rejuvenating Carbon" Award Last Night". Portland Mercury. Retrieved April 22, 2013. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  19. ^ "House bill would make bike paths (and more) eligible for highway trust fund". Retrieved November 28, 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  20. ^ "Constitutional amendment would expand state transportation funds beyond highways". Retrieved November 28, 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  21. ^ "Exclusive: BTA will go for "Idaho style" stop sign law". Retrieved November 28, 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  22. ^ "UPDATED State rep wants traffic fines based on vehicle weight". Retrieved November 28, 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  23. ^ "Commissioner Jules Bailey". Multnomah County Commission. Archived from the original on July 3, 2014. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  24. ^ "Multnomah County Commissioner Districts". Multnomah County Elections Division. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  25. ^ "Multnomah County District 1: Jules Bailey defeats Brian Wilson (election results)". The Oregonian. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  26. ^ "Multnomah County Chair race: Deborah Kafoury to resign from Multnomah County Board of Commissioners". The Oregonian. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  27. ^ "May 2014 Primary Election Results". Multnomah County Elections Division. Retrieved September 18, 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  28. ^ "Cities, counties could make seismic upgrades easier for private property owners". The Oregonian. Retrieved November 25, 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  29. ^ "Multnomah County leaders begin reviewing 2015–16 budget priorities". The Oregonian. Retrieved November 25, 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  30. ^ "Multnomah County hopes to make energy upgrades easier to finance". The Oregonian. Retrieved November 25, 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  31. ^ Oregonian/OregonLive, Brad Schmidt | The (November 25, 2015). "Jules Bailey to challenge Ted Wheeler for Portland mayor". oregonlive. Retrieved June 15, 2020.
  32. ^ in 2006, About Beth Slovic Beth Slovic joined Willamette Week as a staff writer; politics, returning in 2014 after a three-year hiatus She covers; immigration; more. "Jules Bailey Will Not Make a November Runoff in Portland Mayor's Race". Willamette Week. Retrieved June 15, 2020.
  33. ^ Howard, Nathan (June 7, 2016). "Big Donors Dominated Portland's 2016 Mayoral Race". Sightline Institute. Retrieved June 15, 2020.
  34. ^ "Jules Kopel Bailey". Ballotpedia. Retrieved June 15, 2020.
  35. ^ Bailey Jr, Everton (October 3, 2020). "Portland mayoral candidate Sarah Iannarone on protests, policing, immediate plans if elected: Q&A". oregonlive. Retrieved October 24, 2020.
  36. ^ "Mayoral candidate Sarah Iannarone hit with election complaint for PhD statement in voters' pamphlet". opb. Retrieved October 24, 2020.