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Joseph Richard Pool (February 18, 1911 – July 14, 1968) was a U.S. Representative from Texas.

Joe Richard Pool
JoeRPool.jpg
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Texas's at-large district
In office
January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1967
Preceded byDistrict created
Succeeded byDistrict abolished
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Texas's 3rd district
In office
January 3, 1967 – July 14, 1968
Preceded byLindley Beckworth
Succeeded byJames M. Collins
Personal details
Born
Joseph Richard Pool

(1911-02-18)February 18, 1911
Fort Worth, Texas, U.S.
DiedJuly 14, 1968(1968-07-14) (aged 57)
Houston, Texas, U.S.
Cause of deathHeart attack
Resting placeLaurel Land Memorial Park, Dallas, Texas, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Alma materSouthern Methodist University

HistoryEdit

Pool was born in Fort Worth, Texas in 1911. He graduated from Oak Cliff High School (now W. H. Adamson High School) in the Dallas Independent School District and attended the University of Texas from 1929 to 1933. In 1937, he graduated from Southern Methodist University School of Law, was admitted to the Texas bar, and commenced the practice of law in Dallas, Texas.

During World War II, he served with the United States Army from 1943 to 1945 as a special investigator in the Intelligence section of the Army Air Corps. After the war, he resumed the practice of law.

He entered politics as a Democrat, and was elected to the Texas House of Representatives in 1952. He was re-elected in 1954 and 1956, serving from 1953 to 1958. He was an unsuccessful candidate for U.S. Representative from the 5th District of Texas in 1958, losing in the primary to Barefoot Sanders. He ran again in 1960, winning the primary, but lost in the general election to Republican incumbent Bruce Alger.[1]

In the 1960 Congressional reapportionment, Texas received an additional U.S. House seat, but the districts were not redrawn and an at-large seat was created. Pool won the Democratic nomination for this seat and was elected to the Eighty-eighth Congress.[2] He was re-elected to the Eighty-ninth Congress in 1964.[3]

However, in Wesberry v. Sanders (1964), the Supreme Court banned at-large Congressional districts. Texas redrew its districts, and Pool opted to run for the 3rd District north of Dallas. He was re-elected from this district to the Ninetieth Congress in 1966.[4]

Pool served in Congress from January 3, 1963 until his death from a heart attack in Houston, Texas on July 14, 1968.

He was interred in Laurel Land Memorial Park, Dallas, Texas.

MemorialsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1966, Benjamin Guthrie, Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. p 43
  2. ^ Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 6, 1962, Benjamin Guthrie, Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. p 37
  3. ^ Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 3, 1964, Benjamin Guthrie, Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. p 43
  4. ^ Statistics of the Congressional Election of November 8, 1966, Benjamin Guthrie, Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. p 41

SourcesEdit

  • United States Congress. "Joe R. Pool (id: P000426)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.


External linksEdit

Texas House of Representatives
Preceded by
unknown
Member of the Texas House of Representatives
from District unknown (Dallas)

1953–1958
Succeeded by
unknown
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
District created
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Texas's at-large congressional seat

January 3, 1963 – January 3, 1967
Succeeded by
District abolished
Preceded by
Lindley Beckworth
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Texas's 3rd congressional district

January 3, 1967 – July 14, 1968
Succeeded by
James M. Collins