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List of members of the House Un-American Activities Committee

Special Committee to Investigate Un-American Activities (1938-1944)Edit

Commonly known as the "Dies Committee." The permanent secretary of the committee was Robert E. Stripling throughout.[1]

75th Congress (1938)Edit

 
Conservative Texas Democrat Martin Dies, Jr. was chair of the Special Committee to Investigate Un-American Activities for its entire seven-year duration.

76th Congress (1939-1940)Edit

77th Congress (1941-1942)Edit

78th Congress (1943-1944)Edit

Committee on Un-American Activities (1945-1968)Edit

Effective with the 79th Congress of 1945, the former special committee of the House of Representatives was made permanent, expanded to 9 members, and renamed. Permanent secretaries of the committee would be Robert E. Stripling (1945-1948), John W. Carrington (1949-1952), Thomas W. Beale, Sr. (1953-1956), Richard Arens (1957-1960), Frank S. Tavenner, Jr. (1961-1962), Francis J. McNamara (1963-1968).[2]

79th Congress (1945-1946)Edit

80th Congress (1947-1948)Edit

 
Future U.S. President Richard M. Nixon was a HUAC member from 1947 until election to the U.S. Senate in November 1950

81st Congress (1949-1950)Edit

82nd Congress (1951-1952)Edit

83rd Congress (1953-1954)Edit

84th Congress (1955-1956)Edit

 
Pennsylvania Democrat Francis E. Walter, a member of HUAC from 1951, would serve as chairman of the committee from January 1955 until his death in 1963.

85th Congress (1957-1958)Edit

86th Congress (1959-1960)Edit

87th Congress (1961-1962)Edit

88th Congress (1963-1964)Edit

89th Congress (1965-1966)Edit

90th Congress (1967-1968)Edit

Committee on Internal SecurityEdit

 
Chair of the renamed House Committee on Internal Security for its entire 7-year duration was Democrat Richard H. Ichord, Jr. of Missouri.

In February 1969 the name of the committee was changed for a second time. The 9 member Committee on Internal Security would remain in existence until 1975. Chief professional staff members of the Committee on Internal Security included Donald G. Sanders (1969-1973),[3] Robert M. Horner (???-1973), and William H. Stapleton (1974-1975).

The House Committee on Internal Security was formally terminated on January 14, 1975, the day of the opening of the 94th Congress.[4] The Committee's files and staff were transferred on that day to the House Judiciary Committee from whence the Internal Security Committee had sprung.[4]

91st Congress (1969-1970)Edit

92nd Congress (1971-1972)Edit

93rd Congress (1973-1974)Edit

See alsoEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ Eric Bentley, Thirty Years of Treason: Excerpts from Hearings Before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, 1938-1968. New York: The Viking Press 1971; pp. 955-956.
  2. ^ Bentley, Thirty Years of Treason, pp. 956-957.
  3. ^ Bentley, Thirty Years of Treason, pg. 957.
  4. ^ a b Charles E. Schamel, Records of the US House of Representatives, Record Group 233: Records of the House Un-American Activities Committee, 1945-1969 (Renamed the) House Internal Security Committee, 1969-1976. Washington, DC: Center for Legislative Archives, National Archives and Records, July 1995; pg. 4.

Further readingEdit

  • William F. Buckley, The Committee and Its Critics; a Calm Review of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. New York: Putnam Books, 1962.
  • Robert K. Carr, The House Committee on Un-American Activities. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1952.
  • Frank J. Donner, The Un-Americans. New York: Ballantine Books, 1961.
  • Walter Goodman, The Committee: The Extraordinary Career of the House Committee on Un-American Activities. New York: Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1968.
  • Joseph Litvak, The Un-Americans : Jews, the Blacklist, and Stoolpigeon Culture. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2009.
  • Kenneth O'Reilly, Hoover and the Unamericans: The FBI, HUAC, and the Red Menace. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1983.