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Joe Mantell (né Mantel; December 21, 1915 – September 29, 2010) was an American actor of film and television. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role as Angie in the 1955 film Marty,[3] which earned the Best Picture Award.

Joe Mantell
Joe Mantell Port of New York 02.jpg
Mantell in Port of New York, 1949
Born (1915-12-21)December 21, 1915
Brooklyn, New York City
New York, U.S
Died September 29, 2010(2010-09-29) (aged 94)
Tarzana, California, U.S.
Occupation Film and television actor
Years active 1949–1990
Spouse(s) Mary Mantell (?-2010) (his death)[1]
Children Cathy, Jeanne, Robert[2]
Joe Mantell holds a gun on Orson Bean, Theodore Bikel and Polly Bergen in
"San Francisco Fracas", an episode of
The Elgin Hour (1955)

Contents

CareerEdit

Mantell appeared in the episode "Storm Center" of the Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, as well as the pilot of the crime drama, The Untouchables, starring Robert Stack that originally aired as a 2 part episode of the WDP. He later turned up in The Untouchables series itself, in the 2 part episode, "The Unhired Assassin", where he played Giuseppe Zangara, the would-be assassin of Franklin Delano Roosevelt who ended up accidentally assassinating Chicago Mayor Anton Cermak instead. In the 1974 film Chinatown, Mantell played Lawrence Walsh, associate of private eye Jake Gittes. He delivered the film's famous last line, "Forget it, Jake, it's Chinatown." The character of Walsh reappeared in The Two Jakes. He had a small role in Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds.[4]

Mantell appeared frequently in series television, including two episodes of The Twilight Zone: "Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room" (in a starring role) and "Steel" (co-starring with Lee Marvin). Mantell played a betrayed husband in the "Guilty Witness" episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents. He had a recurring role from 1961 to 1962 as Ernie Briggs in six episodes of the CBS sitcom, Pete and Gladys, starring Harry Morgan and Cara Williams. Mantell also starred in season one, episode five ("Far from the Brave") of the TV series Combat!. From 1967-69 Mantell appeared five times on Mannix, four of which were in his recurring role of private detective Albie Loos.

Personal lifeEdit

Mantell was born in the Brooklyn borough of New York City to immigrant parents from Austria.[5] His name was originally spelled "Mantel" and accented on the first syllable, but at the beginning of his acting career, Mantell added the extra "L" and changed the pronunciation to "Man-TELL". On September 29, 2010, Mantell died in Tarzana, California, at the age of 94.[6][7]

FilmographyEdit

Year Title Role Notes
1949 The Undercover Man Newsboy Uncredited
1949 Barbary Pirate Dexter Freeman
1949 Port of New York Messenger Uncredited
1949 And Baby Makes Three Newsboy Uncredited
1955 Marty Angie
1956 Storm Center George Slater
1957 Beau James Bernie Williams - Broadway producer
1957 The Sad Sack Pvt. Stan Wenaslawsky
1958 Onionhead Harry 'Doc' O'Neal
1960 The Crowded Sky Louis Capelli
1960 "Nervous Man in a Four Dollar Room" Jackie / John episode of The Twilight Zone
1963 The Birds traveling salesman at Diner's Bar
1966 Mister Buddwing 1st Cab Driver
1970 Kelly's Heroes General's Aide Uncredited
1974 Chinatown Lawrence Walsh
1984 Blame It on the Night Attorney
1985 Movers & Shakers Larry
1990 The Two Jakes Lawrence Walsh (final film role)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/01/arts/01mantell.html
  2. ^ http://articles.latimes.com/2010/oct/02/local/la-me-joe-mantell-20101002
  3. ^ Osborne, Robert (1994). 65 Years of the Oscar: The Official History of the Academy Awards. London: Abbeville Press. p. 138. ISBN 1-55859-715-8. 
  4. ^ "Joe Mantell filmography". New York Times. Retrieved 2010-10-01. 
  5. ^ Weber, Bruce (October 1, 2010). "Joe Mantell Is Dead at 94; Played Sidekick in 'Marty'". The New York Times. 
  6. ^ Coyle, Jake. "Actor Joe Mantell of 'Marty,' 'Chinatown' dies at 94". Associated Press. Retrieved 2010-09-30. 
  7. ^ "Chinatown actor Joe Mantell dies aged 94". BBC. September 30, 2010. Retrieved 2010-09-30. 

External linksEdit