James Popil

James Michael Popil (November 5, 1909 – August 14, 1978) was a politician from Alberta, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1935 to 1948 as a member of the Social Credit caucus in government.

James Michael Popil
James M Popil.png
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta
In office
August 22, 1935 – March 21, 1940
Preceded bySamuel Carson
Succeeded byDistrict abolished
ConstituencySturgeon
In office
March 21, 1940 – August 17, 1948
Preceded byNew district
Succeeded byPeter Chaba
ConstituencyRedwater
Personal details
Born(1909-11-05)November 5, 1909
Redwater, Alberta, Canada[1]
DiedAugust 14, 1978(1978-08-14) (aged 68)
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Political partySocial Credit
Occupationpolitician

Political careerEdit

Popil first ran for public office as a Social Credit candidate in the 1935 Alberta general election. He defeated incumbent cabinet minister John Love and four other candidates on ballot transfers in the electoral district of Sturgeon.[2]

After Sturgeon was abolished in the 1940 boundary redistribution, Popil ran for a second term in office in the new Redwater electoral district in the election held that year. He won with a substantial first ballot majority over two other candidates.[3]

Popil ran for his third and final term in office in the 1944 general election. He marginally increased his popular vote and won a big majority to hold his seat.[4] He retired from provincial politics at dissolution of the assembly in 1948.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Normandin, P.G.; Normandin, A.L. (1965). Guide Parlementaire Canadien. P.G. Normandin. ISSN 0315-6168. Retrieved April 16, 2015.
  2. ^ "Sturgeon Official Results 1935 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010.
  3. ^ "Redwater Official Results 1940 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010.
  4. ^ "Redwater Official Results 1944 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 29, 2010.
  5. ^ "Announcements". The Edmonton Journal. August 16, 1978. p. E4.

External linksEdit