List of The Great British Bake Off finalists

  (Redirected from James Morton (baker))

The Great British Bake Off is a British television baking competition, produced by Love Productions. It premiered in 2010. This list contains the finalists—annual winners and runners-up—who survived eliminations throughout every series.

Series 1 (2010)Edit

Baker Age (on
show debut)
Occupation Hometown Result
Edward "Edd" Kimber 24 Debt collector for Yorkshire Bank Bradford WINNER
Miranda Gore Browne 37 Food buyer for Marks & Spencer Midhurst, West Sussex Eliminated on
final's 1st round
Ruth Clemens 31 Retail manager/Housewife Poynton, Cheshire Runner-up

No baker was awarded Star Baker this season.[1][2]

Edd Kimber (winner)Edit

Edd Kimber (born 7 March 1985 in Bradford), the winner of the first series in 2010,[3] previously worked as a debt collector for a bank at the time of original airing. Since then, Kimber has written four cookbooks Say It With Cake, The Boy Who Bakes, Patisserie Made Simple and One Tin Bakes.[4] He was "resident baker" on The Alan Titchmarsh Show.

He now lives in Highbury, North London with his boyfriend.[5]

Miranda Gore BrowneEdit

Miranda Gore Browne, eliminated in the finals of the first series, was a buyer of Marks & Spencer at the time of original airing. As of 2017, she is a consultant for the National Trust and ambassador for Aga Rangemaster Group. She also hosts baking classes in West Sussex.[6] She wrote her cookbooks Biscuit (2012; ISBN 9780091945022) and Bake Me a Cake As Fast As You Can (2014; ISBN 9781446489178, 9780091945114). She also appeared in a video A Perfect Afternoon Tea (2014).

Ruth ClemensEdit

Ruth Clemens, runner-up of the first series, established her blog The Pink Whisk, which Kate Watson-Smyth of The Independent ranked 49th out of fifty "best food websites" of 2011.[7]

Series 2 (2011)Edit

Baker Age (on
show debut)
Occupation Hometown Star Baker
(count & weeks)
Result
Joanne "Jo" Wheatley 41 Housewife Ongar, Essex 1 (6th) WINNER
Holly Bell 31 Advertising executive Leicester 2 (1st & 4th) Runner-up
Mary-Anne Boermans 45 Housewife Kidderminster, Worcestershire None Runner-up

There was no Star Baker on the seventh week as Paul and Mary felt singling out one baker when the results were incredibly close wouldn't be right.

Jo Wheatley (winner)Edit

Joanne Wheatley (née Rutland; born 27 May 1969), the winner of the second series,[8] has started her own cookery school and written two cookbooks A Passion For Baking (2013; ISBN 9781780338774) and Home Baking (2014; ISBN 9781472109354). She has appeared in The One Show, performed cooking demonstrations on The Alan Titchmarsh Show and written a column in the Sainsbury's magazine. She writes for The Sun and various food publications.[9]

Wheatley is married to Richard, who was sentenced on 20 April 2010 to seven years in prison for a £60-million money laundering scheme. They have three sons together.[10][11]

Holly BellEdit

Holly Bell, one of runners-up of the second series, worked in an advertising industry at the time of original airing.[12] She wrote her cookbook Recipes from a Normal Mum (2014; ISBN 978-1-84949-419-9)

Mary-Anne BoermansEdit

Mary-Anne Boermans (born 1964/65), one of runners-up of the second series, had been a housewife at the time of original airing and previously played women's rugby for Wales.[13] She wrote her cookbook Great British Bakes (2013; ISBN 9781448155019, 978-0-22-409556-3) and runs a blog Time to Cook.

Series 3 (2012)Edit

Baker Age (on
show debut)
Occupation Hometown Star Baker
(count & weeks)
Result Links
John Whaite 22 Law student Wigan 1 (2nd) WINNER [14]
Brendan Lynch 63 Recruitment consultant Sutton Coldfield 2 (4th & 6th) Runner-up [15]
James Morton 21 Medical student Hillswick, Shetland Islands 3 (3rd, 8th & 9th) Runner-up [16]

There was no elimination the sixth week after John sustained a major injury to his finger and could not complete the last bake. The judges determined it would be unfair to eliminate anyone.

John Whaite (winner)Edit

John Whaite (born 1988/89), winner of the third series, was a University of Manchester graduate student studying law at the time of the series.[17][18] Whaite was raised in Wigan. He also has two older sisters.[18] He attended the University of Oxford twice.[19]

After Bake Off, Whaite graduated with a law degree.[20] He then attended London school of Le Cordon Bleu.[21]

In January 2016, Whaite also established his eponymous cookery school, John Whaite's Kitchen Cookery School, a converted 400-year-old barn on his family's farm in Wrightington, Lancashire.[22][23] He appeared in ITV's Lorraine,[24][25] This Morning, What's Cooking?, The Alan Titchmarsh Show and Sunday Brunch. He also co-presented ITV's cooking competition series Chopping Block with Rosemary Shrager in 2016–17. He also regularly appeared as a guest of presenter Steph McGovern's Channel 4 talk show Steph's Packed Lunch.[26][27]

Whaite announced his engagement with his partner Paul Atkins, a graphic designer, in July 2017.[28][29]

Whaite was a contestant on the nineteenth series (2021) of Strictly Come Dancing, appearing as part of the first ever male same-sex pairing with professional Johannes Radebe.[30][31] Whaite and Radebe in December 2021 became one of two finalist pairs but then lost the contest to another pair, actress Rose Ayling-Ellis and dancer Giovanni Pernice, via public vote.[32]

Whaite wrote the following cookbooks: John Whaite Bakes (2013), John Whaite Bakes at Home (2014), Perfect Plates in 5 Ingredients (2016), Comfort: Food to Soothe the Soul (2018), and A Flash in the Pan (2019).

Brendan LynchEdit

Brendan Lynch (born 1948/49), runner-up of the third series, was a semi-retired company director at the time of the series.[17] Two years after Bake Off, in 2014, Lynch was treated in four months for his chronic ulcerative colitis, to which he attributed stress during the Bake Off filming and consumption of his own bakes. Since then, he consumed nutritional supplements and reduced use of sugar, lactose and gluten in order to control the condition.[33]

James MortonEdit

James Morton (born 1990/91), runner-up of the third series, was a University of Glasgow medical student at the time of the series.[17] Since then, Morton graduated from the University with a medical degree in March 2015, qualifying him a doctor.[34] He also established his blog containing his recipes.[35] He is the son of Tom Morton, a broadcaster.[36]

Morton re-competed against Chetna Makan (series five), Howard Middleton (series four), and Janet Basu (series two) in the Boxing Day episode of The Great Christmas Bake Off 2016 special. Makan was crowned the episode's winner.[37]

Morton wrote cookbooks Brilliant Bread (2013), How Baking Works (2015), Brew: The Foolproof Guide to Making World-Class Beer at Home (2016), Shetland: Cooking on the Edge of the World (2018) with his father Tom as co-writer, Super Sourdough (2020), Sourdough from Scratch (2021), and Brew from Scratch (2021). His book Brilliant Bread won the Cookery Book of the Year Award at the 2014 Guild of Food Writers Awards.[38] The 2018 critically-acclaimed book Shetland was criticised by some over what they perceived as a negative portrayal of Shetlanders, particularly Morton's poem.[39][40]

Morton also wrote baking columns for a Scottish tabloid Sunday Mail.[41]

Morton applied one of his brews Oatmeal Extra Pale, commercially produced by Dark Star Brewing Company, for the now-defunct National Home Brewing Awards in 2014.[42]

Series 4 (2013)Edit

Baker Age (on show debut) Occupation Hometown Star Baker (count & weeks) Result Links
Frances Quinn 31 Children's Clothes Designer Market Harborough, Leicestershire 1 (7th) WINNER [43]
Ruby Tandoh 20 History of Art and Philosophy Student Southend, Essex 3 (2nd, 6th & 8th) Runner-up [44]
Kimberley Wilson 30 Psychologist London 2 (4th & 9th) Runner-up [45]

Frances Quinn (winner)Edit

Frances Elizabeth Quinn (born 1981)[46] is a British baker and children's clothing designer from Market Harborough who won the fourth series in 2013.[47] Her first book release was Quinntessential Baking.[48]

Quinn is an ambassador of the Cream Tea Society and is a frequent guest on UK radio and TV. She has appeared on the pages of Vogue, has baked for illustrator Quentin Blake, and has appeared on Pointless Celebrities with 2014 GBBO runner-up Richard Burr. Other clients include Jools Holland and Wimbledon Tennis Club.

In May 2020, it was reported that Quinn had been banned from Waitrose for shoplifting. An officer representing Leicestershire Police stated: "She admitted her involvement to officers and the matter was dealt with by way of a community resolution”.[49]

She is the youngest of five siblings, having three brothers and one sister.[50]

Ruby TandohEdit

Ruby Tandoh (born 1991/92), runner-up of the fourth series, was a first-year University College London student studying history and art at the time of filming.[51] She was also a former model.[52] After Bake Off, Tandoh has written articles for The Guardian.[53]

Tandoh wrote cookbooks Crumb (2014), Flavour (2016), and Eat Up (2018), and Breaking Eggs (2021).

Tandoh admitted her many years of eating disorder in a 2016 interview.[54] She also wrote a one-off magazine Do What You Want, whose profits went to charities, including ones tackling eating disorders.[55]

Tandoh came out as bisexual in a 2018 interview with The Times.[56] She married her partner Leah Pritchard in September 2018.[57]

Kimberley WilsonEdit

Kimberley Wilson (born 1982/83), runner-up of the fourth series, was a psychologist at the time of filming.[51] Wilson was born when her mother was 22; Wilson's brother was born five years prior. Their single mother raised both Kimberley and her brother in East London.[58]

After Bake Off, Wilson has run a private clinic in Central London and wrote a self-help book How to Build a Healthy Brain (2020), her first book.[58] She hosts her own podcast Stronger Minds, which debuted in 2020.[59] She and Xand van Tulleken co-host a BBC psychology-based podcast Made of Stronger Stuff, which debuted in 2021.[60]

Series 5 (2014)Edit

Baker Age (on
show debut)
Occupation Hometown Star Baker
(count & weeks)
Result Links
Nancy Birtwhistle 60 Retired Practice Manager Barton-upon-Humber, Lincolnshire 1 (1st) WINNER [61]
Richard Burr 38 Builder Mill Hill, London 5 (2nd, 4th, 7th–9th) Runner-up [62][63]
Luis Troyano 42 Graphic Designer Poynton, Cheshire 1 (3rd) Runner-up [64][65]

Because the judges were unable to agree, no one was eliminated on the sixth week.

Nancy Birtwhistle (winner)Edit

Nancy Birtwhistle (born c. 1954) is a British baker who, in winning the fifth series in 2014 at the age of 60, became the oldest winner of The Great British Bake Off. Birtwhistle – a grandmother of eight[66] – had applied to appear in the program in 2013 but was unsuccessful.[67] She now contributes to national papers such as The Daily Telegraph, has her own website, and gives baking demonstrations across the UK.[68] Before taking baking up seriously, Birtwhistle was a Practice Manager at a GP surgery.[69] She was born in Hull,[70] and lives in Barton-upon-Humber with her husband, Tim.[71] In 2019, Birtwhistle released a cookbook, Sizzle & Drizzle: Tips for a Modern Day Home-maker.[72] She also wrote Clean & Green: 101 Hints and Tips for a More Eco-Friendly Home (2021).

Richard BurrEdit

Richard Burr (born 1975/76), one of runners-up of the fifth series, worked as a fourth-generation construction worker for his family building business, co-run by his father, at the time of the competition. At that same time, his mother worked as a bursar for a secondary school.[73]

Burr attended Queen Elizabeth's School, Barnet, a boys' grammar school. When he was a teenager, he worked at a bakery in Mill Hill.[73]

Burr graduated from Birkbeck, University of London in 2012 with his first-class honours degree in biodiversity and conservation.[73] As of December 2019, he works in conservation.[74]

Burr has a wife with three daughters.[73]

Burr wrote BIY: Bake It Yourself, released on 27 August 2015. He also has his own blog (https://richardburr.london).[73]

Luis TroyanoEdit

Luis Troyano (late 1971 – late October 2020), one of the runners-up of the fifth series, owned a graphic design business at the time of competition.[75] He was born in Stockport, England to his Spanish-born parents, Maria and Manuel, who emigrated to the United Kingdom in the 1960s. He began working daily for his father's Italian restaurant after school at age 12. His father Manuel died of cancer when Luis was 16.[76]

After Bake Off, Troyano wrote a 2015 cookbook Bake It Great.[77] He opened The Hive Bakery in Poynton, Cheshire in 2016.[76]

In April 2019, Troyano had a cancer surgery, which he mentioned on Twitter. As confirmed by his agent on 5 November 2020 via Twitter, he died of esophageal cancer at age 48 on the week of 25 October 2020.[78] Until his death, he was married to his wife Louise, also a graphic designer.[76][78]

Series 6 (2015)Edit

Baker Age (on
show debut)
Occupation Hometown Star Baker
(count & weeks)
Result Links
Nadiya Hussain 30 Full-time mother Leeds / Luton 3 (5th, 8th & 9th) WINNER [79]
Ian Cumming 41 Travel photographer Great Wilbraham, Cambridgeshire 3 (2nd–4th) Runner-up [80][81]
Tamal Ray 29 Trainee anaesthetist Manchester 1 (7th) Runner-up [82]

Nadiya Hussain (winner)Edit

Nadiya Jamir Hussain[83] MBE (née Begum;[84] born 25 December 1984), the winner of the sixth series, was a full-time mother and housewife at the time of the competition. Also, at the time, she lived in Leeds with her husband Abdal[85]—an IT specialist—and three children, and she studied for an Open University degree in Childhood and Youth Studies.[86] Her appearance on the show and ensuing popularity with audiences were deemed important steps toward shifting stereotypes about the Muslim community and acceptance about cultural diversity.[87][88][89]

Hussain is a second-generation British Bangladeshi, born and raised in Luton, Bedfordshire, where she attended Beech Hill Primary School, Challney High School and Luton Sixth Form College. She has five siblings: three sisters and two brothers. Her Sylheti father, who originates from Beanibazar, was a chef and owned an Indian restaurant.[90]

After Bake Off, the Hussains moved to Milton Keynes nearer to London in order for Nadiya to pursue a culinary career.[85] Nadiya also worked as a contributing editor of BBC Good Food.[91] She also wrote her debut cookbook Nadiya's Kitchen (2016); children's books Nadiya's Bake Me A Story (2016) and Nadiya's Bake Me a Festive Story (2017), both of which also contains recipes; her novel The Secret Lives of the Amir Sisters (2017); and her autobiography Finding My Voice (2019).

Hussain appeared in her television shows The Chronicles of Nadiya (2016), Nadiya's British Food Adventure (2017), Nadiya's Family Favourites (2018), Time to Eat (2019), Nadiya Bakes (2020), and Nadiya's Fast Flavors (2021).[92][93] She also appeared as one of judges for the fourth series of Junior Bake Off on CBBC.[94]

In 2016, Nadiya was given the opportunity to bake the official cake for Queen Elizabeth's 90th birthday.[95] She was appointed Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 2020 New Year Honours for services to broadcasting and the culinary arts.[96]

Ian CummingEdit

Ian Cumming (born 1972/73), one of runner-ups of the sixth series, has been a travel photographer since the 1990s. Cumming's pictures appeared in various publications like National Geographic and British Airways ad campaigns. His father was an engineer.[97]

Cumming lives in Cambridgeshire with his wife, who is a doctor, and two children (one daughter and one son).[97]

Tamal RayEdit

Tamal Ray (born 1985/86), one of runner-ups of the sixth series, was a trainee anaesthetist at the time of the competition. His parents emigrated from India to the United Kingdom in the 1970s.[98] Ray moved to Manchester with his parents while attending the Haberdashers' Aske's Boys' School (Habs). He graduated from the Habs in 2004 and then from King's College London with a bachelor's degree in Medicine.[99]

After Bake Off, Ray appeared in one of January 2016 episodes of BBC's This Week supporting junior doctors' strike amidst government negotiations over pay and working conditions.[100][101] He also appeared in a one-episode medical programme Be Your Own Doctor (2016) with co-host Kate Quilton.[102] He also has written columns and published his recipes for The Guardian.[98][103]

Ray re-competed for the 2018–19 New Year's special against other previous contestants Candice Brown (series seven, winner), Kate Henry (series five), and Steven Carter-Bailey (series eight). Carter-Bailey was crowned the winner of that special.[104] He and another Bake Off contestant Kim-Joy of the ninth series attended the finale screening of the first series (2019) of RuPaul's Drag Race UK.[105]

Ray publicly came out as gay in autumn 2015.[106][107]

Series 7 (2016)Edit

Baker Age (on
show debut)
Occupation Hometown Star Baker
(count & weeks)
Result Links
Candice Brown 31 PE teacher Barton-Le-Clay, Bedfordshire 3 (2nd, 5th & 8th) WINNER [108][109]
Jane Beedle 61 Garden designer Beckenham 1 (1st) Runner-up [110]
Andrew Smyth 25 Aerospace engineer Derby / Holywood, County Down 2 (7th & 9th) Runner-up [111][112]

Candice Brown (winner)Edit

Candice Brown (born 21 December 1984), the winner of the seventh series, was a PE teacher at Ashlyns School[113] at the time of the competition.[114] In her victory speech she attributed her success to starting baking at four years old.[115]

Brown graduated from the University of Birmingham with a Bachelor's degree in teaching.[116] As reported in November 2016, after Bake Off, she left her job as a PE teacher at Ashlyns School, Berkhamsted in order to pursue a career in baking.[117]

She wrote the cookbooks Comfort: Delicious Bakes and Family Treats (2017; ISBN 1785037072) and Happy Cooking (2021; ISBN 9781529108330).

Brown occasionally cooks on the ITV daytime programme This Morning. She took part in the tenth series of Dancing on Ice on ITV in 2018, in which she was partnered with Matt Evers.[118] In 2019 she appeared in The Great New Year's Bake Off and on Celebrity Mastermind, which she won having taken Audrey Hepburn as her specialist subject.[119]

In 2018, Brown worked for a short time in the pub kitchen of Tom Kerridge[120] before taking up the lease, with her brother Ben, of the Green Man pub[121] in Eversholt, Bedfordshire.

Brown announced her split from her husband Liam Macauley in June 2020, whom she married in 2018.[122]

Jane BeedleEdit

Jane Beedle (born 1954/55), one of runner-ups of the seventh series, is a garden designer. Her company has worked on London gardens, including ones of Bromley. Beedle's grandfather owned a bakery in Hastings. She has a younger brother.[123] She also has a husband with a son and a daughter.[124]

Beedle re-competed against Andrew Smyth (series seven), Liam Charles (series eight), and Flo Atkins (series eight) in the 2018 Christmas special of Bake Off. She was crowned the special's winner.[125]

Andrew SmythEdit

 
Smyth in 2019

Andrew Michael Smyth (born 1990/91), one of runners-up of the seventh series, is an aerospace engineer for Rolls-Royce Holdings in Derby, designing jet engines.[126] He was born in County Down, Northern Ireland to his parents Nigel and Kay and has one brother Jamie.[127][128] He sings tenor especially for a choir group in Derby.[128]

Smyth graduated from Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge in 2013 with a degree in Engineering.[126][128]

Smyth re-competed against Jane Beedle (series seven), Liam Charles (series eight), and Flo Atkins (series) in the 2018 Christmas special of Bake Off. Beedle was crowned the special's winner.[125]

In 2021, Smyth was one of executive producers of a Netflix baking competition series Baking Impossible.[129] He also served as a judge on the show.[130]

Series 8 (2017)Edit

Baker Age (on show debut) Occupation Hometown Star Baker (count & weeks) Result Links
Sophie Faldo 33 Former army officer and trainee stuntwoman West Molesey, Surrey 2 (5th & 9th) WINNER [131]
Steven Carter-Bailey 34 Marketer Watford, Hertfordshire 3 (1st, 2nd & 7th) Runner-up [132]
Kate Lyon 29 Health and safety inspector Merseyside 1 (4th) Runner-up [133]

Sophie Faldo (winner)Edit

Sophie Faldo is a former British Army officer who was the winner of the eighth series in 2017, the first series to be broadcast on Channel 4.

Faldo was born in London and grew up in Suffolk. She studied psychology at the University of Manchester and Toulouse.[134] She joined the Royal Artillery and has served in Afghanistan. After leaving the Army, she worked as a personal trainer, taught military boot camps, and was training to be a stuntwoman when she was convinced by her chef boyfriend to apply for The Great British Bake Off.[135]

Faldo won the competition. Twelve hours before the final episode, judge Prue Leith accidentally tweeted the results.[136][137]

She appeared in an episode of a TV series Travels with a Goat on Insight TV, travelling to southern Kenya with Spanish food vlogger Abraham Bandera Baez.[138] She has started a business, Sophie Faldo Couture Cakes.[139]

Faldo rowed to a high standard and was part of the Molesey Boat Club eight that won bronze at the 2011 British Rowing Championships.[140]

Steven Carter-BaileyEdit

Steven Carter-Bailey (born 1982/83), one of runner-ups of the eighth series, was a marketer from Watford, Hertfordshire at the time of the competition.[141]

Carter-Bailey re-competed against Tamal Ray (series seven), Candice Brown (series seven, winner), and Kate Henry (series five) for the 2018–19 New Year's special. He was crowned the special's winner.[104]

Since Bake Off, Carter-Bailey worked for ITV London covering London bakeries and released his first podcast Feed My Curiosity in 2021.[142][143]

Kate LyonEdit

Kate Lyon (born 1987/88), one of runner-ups of the eighth series, was a health and safety inspector from Merseyside at the time of the competition.[141] As of September 2020, she studied for a master's degree in occupational health and safety.[144]

Series 9 (2018)Edit

Baker Age (on show debut) Occupation Hometown Star Baker (count & weeks) Result Links
Rahul Mandal 30 Research scientist Rotherham 2 (2nd & 3rd) WINNER [145][146]
Ruby Bhogal 29 Project manager London 2 (8th & 9th) Runner-up [147][148]
Kim-Joy Hewlett 27 Mental health specialist Leeds 2 (5th & 7th) Runner-up [149][150]

One of contestants this series was absent on the fourth week, leading the judges to decide not to eliminate anyone in that person's absence.

Rahul Mandal (winner)Edit

Rahul Mandal (born 1987) is an Indian baker and engineering researcher, who won the ninth series in 2018.[151] Mandal also works as an engineering researcher at the University of Sheffield's Nuclear Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre.

Mandal is an only child. Born in Howrah, India, his mother was a housewife and his father runs a business supplying engineering parts across India.[151] Rahul graduated from the West Bengal University of Technology with a Bachelor's degree in electronics and communication engineering and then from the University of Calcutta with a master's degree in optics and optoelectronics. He came to the United Kingdom in 2010 on a scholarship to study for his PhD in Optical Metrology at Loughborough University and his thesis was on Calibration and Adjustment of Coherence Scanning Interferometry.[152][153] He joined the Nuclear AMRC in 2015.[154]

In 2018, Mandal won the ninth series, whose finals was viewed by 10 million households.[155] He was then signed as a columnist for The Times Magazine,[153] a part of the Saturday supplement of The Times, and occasionally cooks on the ITV daytime show This Morning.[156] In 2018, Mandal became a self-declared STEM ambassador.[157]

Ruby BhogalEdit

Ruby Bhogal (born 1988/89), one of runners-up of the ninth series, is a project manager in London. Bhogal has written columns for GQ, The Luxury Lifestyle Magazine and GoodHomes. She re-competed for the 2020 Bake Off Christmas special against eliminated non-finalists Jamie Finn (series ten), Rosie Brandreth-Poynter (series ten), and James Hillery (series eight).[158] She also made guest appearances in This Morning and Steph's Packed Lunch.

Kim-Joy HewlettEdit

Kim-Joy Hewlett (born 1991), one of runners-up of the ninth series, was a psychological wellbeing practitioner at the time of the competition.[159] She was born in Belgium to an English father and a Malaysian Chinese mother. She earned a master's degree in psychology in a Leeds university[160]

Kim-Joy released her cookbook Baking with Kim-Joy on 22 August 2019 in the United Kingdom and 3 September 2019 in the United States and Canada.[161] She has published her recipes for The Guardian.[162] She released another cookbook Christmas with Kim-Joy (2020).

Kim-Joy returned for The Great New Year Bake Off special, aired on 1 January 2022, against Jon Jenkins (series nine) and two other contestants of the eleventh series—Hermine and Rowan Williams.[163] Kim-Joy was crowned its winner.[164]

Series 10 (2019)Edit

Baker Age (on
show debut)
Occupation Hometown Star Baker
(count & weeks)
Result Links
David Atherton 36 International health adviser Whitby None WINNER [165][166]
Steph Blackwell 28 Shop assistant Chester 4 (4th–6th, 8th) Runner-up [167]
Alice Fevronia 28 Geography teacher Essex 2 (2nd & 9th) Runner-up [168][169]

David Atherton (winner)Edit

David Atherton was born in Whitby, North Yorkshire in 1983 and lived in the village of Ruswarp until he was 18. He came from a family with 5 children and his mum baked fresh bread and cakes every week.[170][171] He studied art and design before deciding on a career in healthcare and trained as a nurse.[172] He has a post-graduate degree in wilderness and expedition medicine, and works as a health adviser for Voluntary Service Overseas. Atherton followed in the footsteps of his mum who volunteered for VSO in Papua New Guinea in the 1970s.[173] Atherton has worked in various countries around the world, such as Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Papua New Guinea and Nigeria, including a stint as a clinical instructor[173] in Malawi.[174][175]

Atherton took part in the tenth series of The Great British Bake Off, encouraged by friends in his pottery class.[176] He was crowned the winner.

Atherton started writing a cookery column for The Guardian in 2020 on food for fitness.[177] His first book, titled My First Cookbook, is a children's cookbook published by Walker books in August 2020.[178] In 2021, he published two additional follow-up versions for young cooks: My First Green Cookbook and Bake, Make, and Learn to Cook. In May 2021, he published Good to Eat, which focuses on delivering healthy twists to classic recipes. [179]

David lives in South London with his partner Nik Sariyski, who is a visual merchandising manager at Nike.[180][175] His hobbies include cycling and ceramics, as well as food. He came out as gay at age 29.[181]

Steph BlackwellEdit

Steph Blackwell (born 1990/91), one of runners-up of the tenth series, was a shop assistant at the time of the competition. Blackwell was awarded Star Baker four times. She has baked "simple and traditional" recipes.[182]

Alice FevroniaEdit

Alice Fevronia (born 1990/91), one of runners-up of the tenth series, was a geography teacher from London at the time of the competition.[183] She has written column articles for the Delish website.[184]

Series 11 (2020)Edit

Baker Age (on
show debut)
Occupation Hometown Star Baker
(count & weeks)
Result Links
Peter Sawkins 20 Accounting & finance student Edinburgh 2 (1st & 9th) WINNER [185]
Laura Adlington 31 Digital manager Gravesend, Kent 1 (5th) Runner-up [186][187]
Dave Friday 30 Armoured security guard Waterlooville, Hampshire 1 (2nd) Runner-up [188]

Peter Sawkins (winner)Edit

Peter Sawkins (born 30 June 2000) is a Scottish baker and student from Currie, Edinburgh. He won the eleventh series in 2020, which was filmed under special circumstances due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[189] He won the title of Star-Baker twice on the show and is known for his gluten-free and dairy-free fancies.[190] He was the youngest contestant in the 2020 series, as well as the youngest winner and youngest finalist in the history of the competition.[191]

Sawkins first became interested in baking at the age of 12 after watching the third series.[192] He plays badminton, and has played in national competitions in the sport since 2012. He was a member of the 65th Edinburgh company of the Boys' Brigade.[193] He was also president of the badminton club at the University of Edinburgh, where he studied accounting and finance.[194][195]

His first cookbook, Peter Bakes, was published in October 2021.[196]

Laura AdlingtonEdit

Laura Adlington (born 1988/89), one of runners-up of the eleventh series, was a digital manager at the time of the competition.[197]

Dave FridayEdit

Dave Friday (born 1989/90), one of runners-up of the eleventh series, was a security guard at the time of the competition.[197] He has a son born in 2020 to his fiancee, to whom he proposed in that same year in An Extra Slice.[198]

Series 12 (2021)Edit

Baker Age (on
show debut)
Occupation Hometown Star Baker
(count & weeks)
Result Links
Giuseppe Dell'Anno 45 Chief engineer Bristol 2 (3rd & 5th) WINNER [199]
Chigs Parmar 40 Sales manager Leicester 2 (4th & 8th) runner-up [200]
Crystelle Pereira 26 Client relationship manager London 2 (6th & 9th) runner-up [201]

Giuseppe Dell'Anno (winner)Edit

Giuseppe Dell'Anno (born 1975/76), the winner of the twelfth series, was a chief engineer from Bristol and an industrial fellow of the University of Bristol at the time of the competition. Dell'Anno won Star Baker twice.[202] Throughout the competition, his bakes were Italian-inspired. He became the first Italian to win the competition.[203] His father was a professional chef. Giuseppe has a wife and three sons.[202]

Chigs ParmarEdit

Will Chirag Parmar[204] (born 1980/81), nicknamed "Chigs", one of runners-up of the twelfth series, was a sales manager from Leicestershire at the time of the competition.[205][206] Parmar started baking in 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic.[205] He won Star Baker twice.[207] He has one sister.[208]

Crystelle PereiraEdit

Crystelle Pereira (born 1995), one of runners-up of the twelfth series, was a client relationship manager from London at the time of the competition. Pereira is of a Portuguese and Goan descent. Her Portuguese-Goan parents were born in Kenya.[209] She won Star Baker twice.

ReferencesEdit

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Further readingEdit