International Young Physicists' Tournament

The International Young Physicists' Tournament (IYPT)[1], sometimes referred to as the “Physics World Cup”, is a scientific competition between teams of secondary school students. It mimics, as close as possible, the real-world scientific research and the process of presenting and defending the results obtained.

Participants have almost a year to work on 17 open-ended inquiry problems that are published yearly in late July. A good part of the problems involves easy-to-reproduce phenomena presenting unexpected behaviour. The aim of the solutions is not to calculate or reach “the correct answer” as there is no such notion here. The Tournament is rather conclusions-oriented as participants have to design and perform experiments, and to draw conclusions argued from the experiments’ outcome.

The competition itself is not a pen-and-paper competition but an enactment of a scientific discussion (or a defence of a thesis) where participants take the roles of Reporter, Opponent and Reviewer, thus learning about peer review early on in their school years. Discussion-based sessions are called Physics Fights and the performances of the teams are judged by expert physicists.

Teams can take quite different routes to tackle the same problem. As long as they stay within the broadly defined statement of the problem, all routes are legitimate and teams will be judged according to the depths reached by their investigations.

The IYPT is a week-long event in which currently around 150 international pre-university contestants participate.

IYPT is associated with The European Physical Society (EPS) and in 2013, IYPT was awarded the medal of The International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP)" in recognition of its inspiring and wide-ranging contribution to physics education that has touched many lives and countries, over the past 25 years".[citation needed]

Timeline tableEdit

Year No. Venue Host country No. of teams No. of countries Gold winner(s) Silver winner(s)
1988 1st Moscow   Soviet Union 31 3[2] Disputable[2] Disputable[2]
1989 2nd Moscow   Soviet Union 8 7   West Germany,
  Bulgaria
  RSFSR-School 710, Moscow[2]
1990 3rd Moscow   Soviet Union 6[2] 5 *[2]   RSFSR-School 542, Moscow[2]   Latvian SSR-Riga,
  Netherlands[2]
1991 4th Moscow   Soviet Union 7[2] 6 *[2]   Hungary[2]   Poland,
  Soviet Combined team[2]
1992 5th Protvino   Russia 12 10   Belarus,
  Czechoslovakia[2]
  Netherlands,
  Russia[2]
1993 6th Protvino   Russia 19 11   Georgia   Ukraine,
  Hungary[2]
1994 7th Groningen   Netherlands 12 11   Czech Republic,
  Russia
  Georgia
1995 8th Spała   Poland 15 12   Germany   Czech Republic,
  Hungary
1996 9th Tskhaltubo   Georgia 13 10   Czech Republic   Germany,
  Georgia-2
1997 10th Cheb   Czech Republic 15 11   Hungary,
  Czech Republic
  Belarus
1998 11th Donaueschingen   Germany 18 16   Czech Republic   Germany-1,
  Poland
1999 12th Vienna   Austria 19 17   Germany   Georgia,
  Austria-1
2000 13th Budapest   Hungary 17 16   Poland-2   Germany,
  Russia
2001 14th Espoo   Finland 18 16   Slovakia   Australia,
  Germany
2002 15th Odessa   Ukraine 20 18   Poland   Belarus,
  Germany
2003 16th Uppsala   Sweden 23 22   Germany   South Korea,
  Poland
2004 17th Brisbane   Australia 26 24   Poland   Germany,
  Slovakia
2005 18th Winterthur    Switzerland 25 23   Germany   Belarus,
  United States
2006 19th Bratislava   Slovakia 26 24   Croatia   South Korea,
  Germany
2007 20th Seoul   South Korea 22 21   Australia   South Korea-2,
  New Zealand
2008 21st Trogir   Croatia 21 21   Germany   Croatia,
  New Zealand
2009 22nd Tianjin   China 27 27   South Korea   Austria,
  New Zealand
2010 23rd Vienna   Austria 23 23   Singapore,
  Austria,
  New Zealand,
  South Korea
  Germany,
  Chinese Taipei,
  Iran,
  Australia,
  Slovakia
2011 24th Tehran   Iran 21 21   South Korea,
  Austria,
  Germany
  Chinese Taipei,
  Iran,
  Slovakia,
  Singapore,
  Belarus
2012 25th Bad Saulgau   Germany 28 28   South Korea,
  Iran,
  Singapore
  Belarus,
  Germany,
  Chinese Taipei,
   Switzerland,
  Austria
2013 26th Taipei   Chinese Taipei 26 26   Singapore,
  South Korea,
   Switzerland
  Poland,
  New Zealand,
  Slovakia,
  Sweden,
  Brazil
2014 27th Shrewsbury   United Kingdom 28 28   Singapore,
  Slovakia,
  Poland,
  China
  South Korea,
  New Zealand,
  Chinese Taipei,
  Russia,
  Germany
2015 28th Nakhon Ratchasima   Thailand 27 27   Singapore,
  Poland,
  China
  Slovakia,
  Brazil,
  Bulgaria,
  Russia,
  South Korea
2016 29th Ekaterinburg   Russia 29 29   Singapore,
  Germany,
   Switzerland,
  Chinese Taipei
  South Korea,
  Slovakia,
  New Zealand,
  China,
  Hungary
2017 30th Singapore   Singapore 30 30   Singapore,

  China,
  Poland,
  Hungary

  New Zealand,

  Germany,

  Chinese Taipei,

  Brazil,

  Czech Republic

2018 31st Beijing   China 32 32   Singapore,

  China,
  Germany,
  Korea

  Brazil,

  Sweden,

  Slovakia,

  Poland,

  Ukraine

2019 32nd Warsaw   Poland 36 36   Singapore,
  Germany,
   Switzerland,
  China
  Korea,
  Brazil,
  Ukraine,
  New Zealand,
  Sweden
2020 33rd Cancelled due to COVID-19
2021 34th Kutaisi   Georgia 15 15   Poland,

  Slovakia,

  Austria

  Ukraine,

  Hungary,

  Georgia,

   Switzerland,

  Russia

(*) the number of Nations can be disputed as some countries were midway towards a recognized independence

See alsoEdit

FootnotesEdit

  1. ^ "Official IYPT Website". IYPT.org. Retrieved 2021-09-15.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o [Detailed history of IYPTs in 1988–1993 (preprint) http://ilyam.org/Draft_IM_Detailed_history_IYPT_1988-1993.pdf]

External linksEdit