Ibn Abi Zayd al-Qayrawani

Ibn Abī Zayd (Arabic: ابن أبي زيد القيرواني) (922–996), fully Abū Muḥammad ʿAbd Allāh ibn Abī Zayd ʿAbd al-Raḥmān al-Nafzawī ibn Abī Zayd al-Qayrawanī,[5] was a Maliki scholar from Kairouan in Tunisia and was also an active proponent of Ash'ari thought.[1][2][6] His best known work is Al-Risala or the Epistle, an instructional book devoted to the education of young children. He was a member of the Nafzawah Berber tribe and lived in Kairouan. In addition, he served as the Imam (spiritual leader) of one of the mosques' that followed the Maliki School tradition. Based on what he wrote in his Risalah regarding creed, there was many alignments with the Ashari creed. Ibn Abi Zayd notably defended the ashari school in his epistle entitled “Al-Radd `ala al-Qadariyya wa Munaqada Risala al-Baghdadi al-Mu`tazili,” a refutation of the attacks of the Mu`tazili `Ali ibn Isma`il al-Baghdadi.

Ibn Abī Zayd
Personal
Died386/996[1]
ReligionIslam
DenominationSunni
JurisprudenceMālikī[1]
CreedAthari[2][3]
Main interest(s)Aqidah, Fiqh
Notable work(s)Al-Risalah al-Fiqhiyyah
Muslim leader
Influenced by
Influenced

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Aaron Spevack, The Archetypal Sunni Scholar: Law, Theology, and Mysticism in the Synthesis of Al-Bajuri, p 55. State University of New York Press, 1 Oct 2014. ISBN 143845371X
  2. ^ a b Al-Bayhaqi (1999). Allah's Names and Attributes. Translated by Gibril Fouad Haddad. Islamic Supreme Council of America. pp. 17–18. ISBN 9781930409033.
  3. ^ Aaron Spevack, The Archetypal Sunni Scholar: Law, Theology, and Mysticism in the Synthesis of Al-Bajuri, p 55. State University of New York Press, 1 Oct 2014. ISBN 143845371X
  4. ^ Richard C. Martín, Encyclopedia of Islam & the Muslim World, Volume 1, p 105. ISBN 0028656032
  5. ^ Akyeampong, Emmanuel Kwaku; Gates, Henry Louis (2012). Dictionary of African Biography. Vol. 6. OUP USA. p. 100. ISBN 9780195382075.
  6. ^ Herbert J. Liebesny, The Law of the Near & Middle East, SUNY Press, 1975 ISBN 978-0-87395-256-9, p. 175

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