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The ICC ODI Championship is an international One Day International cricket competition run by the International Cricket Council. The competition is notional in that it is simply a ranking scheme overlaid on the regular ODI match schedule. After every ODI match, the two teams involved receive points based on a mathematical formula. Each team's points total is divided by their total number of matches played to give a rating, and all the teams are ranked in a table in order of rating.[1]

ICC ODI Championship
AdministratorInternational Cricket Council
FormatOne Day International
First Edition2002
Latest Editionongoing
Tournament formatnotional (ongoing points
accumulation through
all matches played)
Number of teams16
Current champion England (123 rating)
Most successful Australia (141 months)

By analogy to cricket batting averages, the points for winning an ODI match are always greater than the team's rating, increasing the rating, and the points for losing an ODI match are always less than the rating, reducing the rating. A drawn match between higher and lower rated teams will benefit the lower-rated team at the expense of the higher-rated team. An "average" team that wins as often as it loses while playing a mix of stronger and weaker teams should have a rating of 100.[2]

As of 14 March 2019, England lead the ICC ODI Championship with a rating of 123 from 59 weighted matches, while the lowest rated team, Netherlands, has a rating of 8 from 6 weighted matches.[3]

Contents

Ranking tableEdit

ICC ODI Rankings
Rank Team Matches Points Rating
1   England 59 7,259 123
2   India 71 8,508 120
3   New Zealand 54 6,071 112
4   South Africa 55 6,181 112
5   Australia 53 5,701 108
6   Pakistan 43 5,147 97
7   Bangladesh 42 3,792 90
8   Sri Lanka 62 4,734 76
9   West Indies 44 3,351 76
10   Afghanistan 40 2,554 64
11   Zimbabwe 48 2,497 52
12   Ireland 27 1,169 43
13   Scotland 16 535 33
14   United Arab Emirates 17 263 15
15     Nepal 10 152 15
16   Netherlands 6 50 8
Matches is the number of matches played in the 12-24 months since the May before last, plus half the number in the 24 months before that. See points calculations for more details.
Reference: Cricinfo Rankings page,ICC ODI rankings 2 April 2019

Associate rankingsEdit

In late 2005, the International Cricket Council ranked the top non-Test nations from 11–30 to complement the Test nations' rankings in the ICC ODI Championship. The ICC used the results from the 2005 ICC Trophy and WCQS Division 2 competition (i.e. the primary qualification mechanisms for the 2007 Cricket World Cup) to rank the nations.

These rankings were used to seed the initial stage of the global World Cricket League. Teams ranked 11–16 were placed into Division 1; teams 17–20 were placed into Division 2; teams 21–24 were placed into Division 3; the remaining teams were placed into the upper divisions of their respective regional qualifiers.

As of 19 April 2009 the top six associates gained one day status. Kenya and Ireland have both qualified to appear on the main rating table, Kenya from its existing status and Ireland for its two victories in the 2007 World Cup. Following their victory over Bangladesh in July 2010, the Netherlands joined the main table. Afghanistan, Canada and Scotland remain on the secondary table. In May 2009, the ICC added a rankings table for all associate members. This contained both global and regional placings. In June 2018, the four associates with ODI status were moved to the main ranking list.[4]

Associate rankings according to ICC:

Rank Nation Region
17   Papua New Guinea EAP
18   Hong Kong Asia
19   Canada Americas
20   Namibia Africa
21   Oman Asia
22   United States Americas
23   Singapore Asia
24   Kenya Africa
25   Uganda Africa
26   Denmark Europe
27   Malaysia Asia
28   Bermuda Americas
29   Jersey Europe
30   Vanuatu EAP
31   Qatar Asia
Reference: Associate Rankings updated to 9 March 2018

Historical ICC ODI ChampionsEdit

The ICC provides ratings for the end of each month back to October 2002. This table lists the teams that have successively held the highest rating since that date, by whole month periods.

Team Start End Total Months Cumulative Months Highest Rating
  Australia October 2002 January 2007 52 52 140
  South Africa February 2007 February 2007 1 1 128
  Australia March 2007 February 2008 12 64 130
  South Africa March 2008 May 2008 3 4 127
  Australia June 2008 December 2008 7 71 131
  South Africa January 2009 August 2009 8 12 127
  Australia September 2009 August 2012 35 106 134
  England August 2012 December 2012 5 5 121
  India January 2013 January 2014 12 12 124
  Australia January 2014 August 2014 8 114 117
  India September 2014 September 2014 1 13 113
  Australia October 2014 October 2014 1 115 114
  South Africa October 2014[5] November 2014 ½ 13 115
  India November 2014 November 2014 ½ 14 117
  Australia November 2014 February 2017 26 141 129
  South Africa February 2017 February 2017 1 14 119
  Australia March 2017 March 2017 4 days 141 118
  South Africa March 2017 September 2017 6 20 123
  India 24 September 2017 27 September 2017 4 days 14 120
  South Africa 28 September 2017 31 September 2017 4 days 20 119
  India 1 October 2017 17 October 2017 17 days 15 120
  South Africa 18 October 2017 1 February 2018 4 24 120
  India 2 February 2018 1 May 2018 3 18 123
  England 2 May 2018 present 11 16 127

The ICC recently applied its current rating system to results since 1981 providing ratings for the end of each month back to 1981 further indicating Australia's historical dominance in ODI Cricket with the highest number of months ranked first (198 months). The table only begins from 1981 as, prior to this date, there is not enough data available due to the infrequency of matches and the small number of competing teams in the earlier periods.

The teams that have successively held the highest rating since January 1981 till September 2002, by whole month periods, are:

Team Start End Total Months Cumulative Months
  England January 1981 February 1981 2 2
  West Indies June 1981 November 1981 6 6
  England December 1981 December 1981 1 3
  West Indies January 1982 May 1987 65 71
  England August 1987 March 1988 8 11
  West Indies April 1988 May 1988 2 73
  England August 1988 May 1989 10 21
  West Indies August 1989 December 1989 5 78
  Australia January 1990 March 1990 3 3
  West Indies April 1990 April 1990 1 79
  Australia May 1990 May 1990 1 4
  West Indies July 1990 July 1990 1 80
  Australia August 1990 November 1990 4 8
  Pakistan December 1990 January 1991 2 2
  Australia February 1991 May 1991 4 12
  Pakistan August 1991 August 1991 1 3
  Australia October 1991 May 1992 8 20
  England August 1992 March 1993 8 29
  West Indies April 1993 April 1993 1 81
  Australia May 1993 July 1993 3 23
  West Indies August 1993 November 1994 16 97
  India December 1994 March 1995 4 4
  West Indies April 1995 May 1995 2 99
  India August 1995 October 1995 3 7
  England November 1995 December 1995 2 31
  Australia January 1996 April 1996 4 27
  South Africa May 1996 February 2000 46 46
  Australia March 2000 January 2002 23 50
  South Africa February 2002 February 2002 1 47
  Australia March 2002 September 2002 7 57
Reference: Historical Rankings

The summary of teams that have held the highest rating since 1981 till present by whole month periods, are:

Team Total Months Highest Rating
  Australia 198 140
  West Indies 99 141
  South Africa 71 134
  England 47 135
  India 25 127
  Pakistan 3 131
Reference: Historical Rankings updated to 2/03/2019

TrophyEdit

The team at the top of the ICC ODI Championship has been awarded the ICC ODI Championship shield. Like a 2 euro coin, the shield features an inner circle of gold-coloured metal and is surrounded by a ring of silver-coloured metal. It was first presented in December 2002, when Australia's captain Ricky Ponting received the trophy.[6]

Points calculationsEdit

Each team scores points based on the results of their matches over the last 3–4 years − all matches played in the 12–24 months since the May before last, plus all the matches played in the 24 months before that, for which the matches played and points earned both count half.[7] Each May, the matches and points earned between 3 and 4 years ago are removed, and the matches and points earned between 1 and 2 years ago switch from 100% weighting to 50% weighting. For example, at May 2014, the matches played between May 2010 and May 2011 were removed, and the matches played between May 2012 and May 2013 switched to 50% weighting. This happens overnight, so can result in teams changing positions in the ranking table despite not playing.  

Each time two teams play another match, the rankings table is updated as follows, based on the ratings of the teams immediately before they played. To determine the teams' new ratings after a particular match, first calculate the points earned from the match:

If the gap between the ratings of the two teams before the match was less than 40 points, then:

Match result Points earned
Win Opponent's rating + 50
Tie Opponent's rating
Lose Opponent's rating − 50

If the gap between the ratings of the two teams before the match was at least 40 points, then:

Match result Points earned
Stronger team wins Own rating + 10
Weaker team loses Own rating − 10
Stronger team ties Own rating − 40
Weaker team ties Own rating + 40
Stronger team loses Own rating − 90
Weaker team wins Own rating + 90
  • Each team's rating is equal to its total points scored divided by the total matches played. (Series are not significant in these calculations).
  • Add the match points scored to the points already scored (in previous matches as reflected by the Table), add one to the number of matches played, and determine the new rating.[2]
  • Points earned by teams depend on the opponent's ratings, therefore this system needed to assign base ratings to teams when it started.

See also: Detailed example

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://icc-live.s3.amazonaws.com/cms/media/about_docs/536b1a48c16e5-Reliance%20ICC%20ODI%20Team%20Rankings%20FAQs%202014.pdf
  2. ^ a b "Reliance ICC One-Day International Team Rankings -frequently asked questions" (PDF). ESPNcricinfo. ICC. Retrieved 6 January 2015.
  3. ^ "ICC ODI Rankings – Cricket ODI Ranking – ICC Cricket". icc-cricket.com.
  4. ^ "Four new teams in the ICC's ODI rankings". ESPNcricinfo. Retrieved 2018-06-02.
  5. ^ "South Africa reclaims number-one ODI ranking after five years". International Cricket Council. 28 October 2014. Retrieved 30 August 2015.
  6. ^ "Australia increases lead in ODI standings". Cricinfo.
  7. ^ "FAQs on ICC ODI Team Rankings". Qn4,5, ICC. Retrieved 2016-02-17.

External linksEdit