Holman ministry (1913–1916)

The Holman ministry (1913 – 1916), first Holman ministry or Holman Labor ministry was the 35th ministry of the New South Wales Government, and was led by the 19th Premier, William Holman.

First Holman ministry
35th Cabinet of the State of New South Wales
William Holman 1919.jpg
Date formed30 June 1913 (1913-06-30)
Date dissolved15 November 1916 (1916-11-15)
People and organisations
Head of stateGeorge V (represented by Sir Gerald Strickland)
Head of governmentWilliam Holman
No. of ministers9
Member partyLabor
Status in legislatureMajority government
Opposition partyLiberal Reform
Opposition leaderCharles Wade
History
Election(s)1913 New South Wales election
Outgoing election1917 New South Wales election
PredecessorMcGowen ministry
SuccessorHolman Nationalist ministry

Holman was elected to the New South Wales Legislative Assembly in 1898, serving until 1920, before being elected to the Australian House of Representatives. Holman, as Deputy Leader, had been acting premier from 15 March to 4 September 1911 while Premier James McGowen was overseas. Holman had been absent from the State from 27 December 1912 until 6 June 1913. When Holman returned, McGowen resigned due to his health and misjudgment in attempting to settle a gasworkers strike. Holman was elected leader of the Labor Party and was commissioned to form government by Sir Gerald Strickland, Governor of New South Wales.[1]

At the Easter 1916 NSW Labor Conference, the Holman government was censured "for refusing to endeavour to carry out and give effect to the first plank of the Labour platform - abolition of the Upper House".[2] Holman resigned the Labor leadership but not the premiership or his seat. John Storey was elected leader, however on the same day a motion of confidence in the Holman government was passed and Holman restored as leader.[3]

The ministry covers the period from 30 June 1913 until 15 November 1916.[4] In November 1916 Labor split over conscription, when Premier Holman, and twenty of his supporters, including ministers William Ashford, William Grahame, David Hall, Henry Hoyle and Arthur Griffith were expelled from the party for defying party policy and supporting conscription.[5] Holman and his supporters joined a grand coalition with the members of the various conservative parties.[6] By 1917, this had coalesced into the Nationalist Party of Australia.

Composition of ministryEdit

The composition of the ministry was announced by Premier Holman on 30 June 1913.

Portfolio Minister Party Term start Term end Term length
Premier William Holman[e]   Labor 30 June 1913 15 November 1916 3 years, 138 days
Colonial Secretary 29 January 1914 213 days
John Cann 29 January 1914 15 March 1915 1 year, 45 days
George Black 15 March 1915 15 November 1916 1 year, 245 days
Treasurer John Cann 30 June 1913 29 January 1914 213 days
William Holman[e] 29 January 1914 15 November 1916 2 years, 291 days
Attorney General 30 June 1913 29 January 1914 213 days
David Hall MLC / MLA[a][e] 29 January 1914 15 November 1916 2 years, 306 days
Minister of Justice 30 June 1913 3 years, 138 days
Solicitor General William Holman 19 January 1915 6 February 1915 18 days
Secretary for Lands John Treflé[c] 30 June 1913 11 January 1915 1 year, 195 days
William Ashford[e] 12 January 1915 15 November 1916 1 year, 308 days
Minister for Public Works Arthur Griffith 30 June 1913 15 March 1915 1 year, 258 days
John Cann 15 March 1915 15 November 1916 1 year, 245 days
Minister of Agriculture John Treflé[c] 30 June 1913 29 January 1914 213 days
William Ashford 29 January 1914 23 February 1915 1 year, 25 days
George Black 23 February 1915 15 March 1915 20 days
William Ashford 15 March 1915 1 June 1915 78 days
William Grahame[e] 1 June 1915 15 November 1916 1 year, 167 days
Minister of Public Instruction Campbell Carmichael[d] 30 June 1913 5 March 1915 1 year, 248 days
Arthur Griffith[e] 15 March 1915 7 November 1916 1 year, 237 days
Secretary for Mines Alfred Edden[b] 30 June 1913 29 January 1914 213 days
John Cann 29 January 1914 15 March 1915 1 year, 60 days
John Estell 15 March 1915 31 October 1916 1 year, 230 days
Henry Hoyle[e] 31 October 1916 15 November 1916 15 days
Minister for Labour and Industry James McGowen[b] 30 June 1913 29 January 1914 213 days
John Estell 29 January 1914 31 October 1916 2 years, 276 days
Henry Hoyle[e] 31 October 1916 15 November 1916 15 days
Minister for Public Health Fred Flowers MLC 30 June 1913 27 April 1915 1 year, 301 days
George Black 27 April 1915 15 November 1916 1 year, 202 days
Vice-President of the Executive Council
Representative of the Government in Legislative Council
Fred Flowers MLC 30 June 1913 27 April 1915 1 year, 301 days
John Fitzgerald MLC 27 April 1915 15 November 1916 1 year, 202 days
Minister without portfolio (Assistant Treasurer) Henry Hoyle 29 January 1914 31 October 1916 2 years, 276 days
Minister without portfolio William Grahame 15 March 1915 1 June 1915 78 days

Ministers were members of the Legislative Assembly unless otherwise noted.

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b David Hall resigned from the Legislative Council in November 2013 to be elected to the Legislative Assembly as the Member for Enmore.
  2. ^ a b c Cabinet positions were selected by caucus on 28 January 1914. James McGowen declined to stand and Alfred Edden was defeated.[8]
  3. ^ a b c John Treflé died on 11 January 1915.
  4. ^ a b Campbell Carmichael resigned in March 1915 over a dispute concerning seniority in the cabinet.[7]
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Expelled from Labor Party on 7 November 1916.[5]
  6. ^ The causes of changes to the composition of the ministry, in chronological order, were Hall became an MLA,[a] Edden defeated,[b] Treflé died,[c] Carmichael resigned,[d] and Labor split.[e]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Nairn, Bede. "Holman, William Arthur (1871–1934)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Melbourne University Press. ISSN 1833-7538. Retrieved 11 October 2019 – via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  2. ^ "The PLL: State ministry censured". The Sydney Morning Herald. 27 April 1916. p. 9. Retrieved 24 July 2021 – via Trove.
  3. ^ "To hang on: the ministry yields". The Daily Telegraph. 4 May 1916. p. 6. Retrieved 24 July 2021 – via Trove.
  4. ^ Part 6 Ministries since 1856 (PDF). NSW Parliamentary Record. Parliament of New South Wales. Retrieved 4 March 2020.[f]
  5. ^ a b "PLL expulsions". The Sydney Morning Herald. 7 November 1916. p. 7. Retrieved 7 May 2020 – via Trove.
  6. ^ "Proceedings in the Assembly: censure motion defeated". The Sydney Morning Herald. 11 November 1916. p. 13. Retrieved 7 May 2020 – via Trove.
    "No state crisis". The Sydney Morning Herald. 13 November 1916. p. 6. Retrieved 7 May 2020 – via Trove.
  7. ^ "The cabinet: why Mr Carmichael resigned". The Sydney Morning Herald. 11 March 1915. p. 6. Retrieved 24 July 2021 – via Trove.
  8. ^ "Cabinet selected by caucus". The Sydney Morning Herald. 29 January 1914. p. 9. Retrieved 24 July 2021 – via Trove.

 

Preceded by Holman ministry
1913 – 1916
Succeeded by