Herpyllus ecclesiasticus

The spider species Herpyllus ecclesiasticus is commonly called the eastern parson spider, after the abdominal markings resembling an old-style cravat worn by clergy in the 18th century.[2] It is mainly found in North America east of the Rocky Mountains, i.e., Alberta, Canada east to Nova Scotia, Canada and south to Tamaulipas, Mexico and Florida, USA.[3][4] Individuals can be found throughout the year. They can be found in homes and under rocks or logs in deciduous forests.[4]

Eastern parson spider
Eastern parson spider.jpg
Herpyllus ecclesiasticus[1]
Scientific classification
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H. ecclesiasticus
Binomial name
Herpyllus ecclesiasticus
Hentz, 1832
Synonyms

Drassus vasifer
Prosthesima bimaculata
Prosthesima ecclesiastica
Melanophora bimaculata
Herpyllus vasifer
Herpyllus cratus
Zelotes bryanti

H. ecclesiasticus

DescriptionEdit

Individuals are covered with black hairs on the cephalothorax and gray hairs on the abdomen. On the back is the distinctive white mark that gives the species its common name; there is a small white spot above the spinnerets.[2]

BehaviorEdit

During the day, individuals reside in silken retreats. They emerge to hunt at night.[2]

BiteEdit

Bites are painful, and some individuals may experience an allergic reaction.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Philip N. Cohen Eastern Parson Spider Herpyllus ecclesiasticus
  2. ^ a b c d Jacobs, Steve. "Herpyllus ecclesiasticus". Retrieved June 29, 2019.
  3. ^ "Nearctic Spider Database". Archived from the original on 2008-10-13. Retrieved 2009-01-22.
  4. ^ a b Platnick, Norman I.; Shadab, Mohammad U. (1977). "Revision of the spider genera Herpyllus and Scotophaeus (Araneae, Gnaphosidae) in North America". Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History. 159.