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The Harry Vardon Trophy is awarded by the European Tour. Since 2009 it has been awarded to the winner of the Race to Dubai. Before then it was awarded to the winner of the "Order of Merit". From 1975 to 2008 the Order of Merit was based on prize money but before that date a points system was used. From 1937 until the formation of the European Tour in 1972 the award was presented by the British PGA. The trophy is named for the Jersey golfing great Harry Vardon, who died in 1937.

The Race to Dubai is calculated in euro, although many of the events have prize funds which are fixed in other currencies, mainly pounds sterling or U.S. dollars. In these instances, the amounts are converted into euro at the exchange rate for the week that the tournament is played.

Contents

HistoryEdit

The award was created in 1937 as the Harry Vardon Memorial Trophy. In its first year the award was presented to the player with the best average in the major stroke play events. Seven events were used: Daily Mail Tournament, Silver King Tournament, Dunlop-Southport Tournament, Southend Tournament, Open Championship, Irish Open and News Chronicle Tournament. Qualifying rounds did not count and a minimum of 18 rounds had to be played. The Dunlop-Metropolitan Tournament with its restricted field was not included and so the last qualifying event was the delayed Southend Tournament. Charles Whitcombe became the first winner with an average of 71.62 for 24 rounds. He had played in 6 of the 7 events (all except the Irish Open) scoring 289, 289, 283, 294, 282 and 282 for a total of 1719. The Irish golfer Paddy Mahon was second with an average of 71.90.[1][2][3]

Six events were used in 1938 with a minimum of 16 rounds which had to include The Open Championship. The same events were used as in 1937 with the exception of the Southend Tournament. Henry Cotton won the award with an average of 72.87 having played in 4 of the 6 qualifying events. Reg Whitcombe was second with an average of 73.35 for 20 rounds.[4][5]

A new system was introduced in 1939. A points system was used with the winner getting 1 point, 2nd place getting 2 points, down to 26 points for finishing outside the top 25. Five events were used with a minimum of 16 rounds which had to include the four rounds of the Open Championship. The Dunlop-Southport Tournament did not take place but otherwise the same tournaments were used as in 1938. Reg Whitcombe won with a score of 27 (7th, 6th, 3rd, 2nd and 9th). Sam King was second on 49 which included 26 points because he had not played in the Irish Open. King had a lower average (72.87) than Whitcombe (73).[6][7]

In 1946, after World War II, the award was again given to the player with the best average in the major stroke play events. 20 rounds were required and four rounds of the Open were compulsory. Bobby Locke won with an average of 73.16 in 36 rounds.[8] Norman Von Nida won in 1947 with an average of 71.25 in 52 rounds[9] and Charlie Ward won in 1948 averaging 71.29 over 44 rounds.[10]

WinnersEdit

Year Race to Dubai leader Country Points
2018 Francesco Molinari   Italy 6,041,521
2017 Tommy Fleetwood   England 5,386,955
2016 Henrik Stenson (2/2)   Sweden 5,289,506
2015 Rory McIlroy (3/3)   Northern Ireland 4,727,253
2014 Rory McIlroy (2/3)   Northern Ireland 7,149,503
2013 Henrik Stenson (1/2)   Sweden 4,103,796
Year Race to Dubai leader Country Earnings ()
2012 Rory McIlroy (1/3)   Northern Ireland 5,519,118
2011 Luke Donald   England 5,323,400
2010 Martin Kaymer   Germany 4,461,011
2009 Lee Westwood (2/2)   England 4,237,762
Year Order of Merit leader Country Earnings (€)
2008 Robert Karlsson   Sweden 2,732,748
2007 Justin Rose   England 2,944,945
2006 Pádraig Harrington   Ireland 2,489,337
2005 Colin Montgomerie (8/8)   Scotland 2,794,223
2004 Ernie Els (2/2)   South Africa 4,061,905
2003 Ernie Els (1/2)   South Africa 2,975,374
2002 Retief Goosen (2/2)   South Africa 2,360,128
2001 Retief Goosen (1/2)   South Africa 2,862,806
2000 Lee Westwood (1/2)   England 3,125,147
1999 Colin Montgomerie (7/8)   Scotland 1,822,880
Year Order of Merit leader Country Earnings (£)
1998 Colin Montgomerie (6/8)   Scotland 993,077
1997 Colin Montgomerie (5/8)   Scotland 798,948
1996 Colin Montgomerie (4/8)   Scotland 875,146
1995 Colin Montgomerie (3/8)   Scotland 835,051
1994 Colin Montgomerie (2/8)   Scotland 762,720
1993 Colin Montgomerie (1/8)   Scotland 613,683
1992 Nick Faldo (2/2)   England 708,522
1991 Seve Ballesteros (6/6)   Spain 545,354
1990 Ian Woosnam (2/2)   Wales 574,166
1989 Ronan Rafferty   Northern Ireland 400,311
1988 Seve Ballesteros (5/6)   Spain 451,560
1987 Ian Woosnam (1/2)   Wales 253,717
1986 Seve Ballesteros (4/6)   Spain 242,209
1985 Sandy Lyle (3/3)   Scotland 162,553
1984 Bernhard Langer (2/2)   West Germany 139,344
Year Official Money List leader Country Earnings (£)
1983 Nick Faldo (1/2)   England 119,416
1982 Greg Norman   Australia 66,406
1981 Bernhard Langer (1/2)   West Germany 81,036
1980 Sandy Lyle (2/3)   Scotland 66,060
Year Order of Merit leader Country Earnings (£)
1979 Sandy Lyle (1/3)   Scotland 49,233
1978 Seve Ballesteros (3/6)   Spain 54,348
1977 Seve Ballesteros (2/6)   Spain 46,436
1976 Seve Ballesteros (1/6)   Spain 39,504
1975 Dale Hayes   South Africa 20,508

Before 1975 the Order of Merit was based on a points system, so it was not necessarily headed by the golfer who won the most money. In 1971 Peter Oosterhuis won the Order of Merit and won £9,269. Gary Player was the leading money winner with £11,281 but of that, £8,500 came from winning the 1971 Piccadilly World Match Play Championship.[11]

Prior to the formation of the European Tour the award was presented by the British P.G.A..

Year Order of Merit leader Country
1974 Peter Oosterhuis (4/4)   England
1973 Peter Oosterhuis (3/4)   England
1972 Peter Oosterhuis (2/4)   England
1971 Peter Oosterhuis (1/4)   England
1970 Neil Coles (2/2)   England
1969 Bernard Gallacher   Scotland
1968 Brian Huggett   Wales
1967 Malcolm Gregson   England
1966 Peter Alliss (2/2)   England
1965 Bernard Hunt (3/3)   England
1964 Peter Alliss (1/2)   England
1963 Neil Coles (1/2)   England
1962 Christy O'Connor (2/2)   Ireland
1961 Christy O'Connor (1/2)   Ireland
1960 Bernard Hunt (2/3)   England
1959 Dai Rees (2/2)   Wales
1958 Bernard Hunt (1/3)   England
1957 Eric Brown   Scotland
1956 Harry Weetman (2/2)   England
1955 Dai Rees (1/2)   Wales
1954 Bobby Locke (3/3)   South Africa
1953 Flory Van Donck   Belgium
1952 Harry Weetman (1/2)   England
1951 John Panton   Scotland
1950 Bobby Locke (2/3)   South Africa
1949 Charlie Ward (2/2)   England
1948 Charlie Ward (1/2)   England
1947 Norman Von Nida   Australia
1946 Bobby Locke (1/3)   South Africa
1940–45 No award
1939 Reg Whitcombe   England
1938 Henry Cotton   England
1937 Charles Whitcombe   England

Multiple winnersEdit

Rank Player Country Wins Last win First win
1 Colin Montgomerie   Scotland 8 2005 1993
2 Seve Ballesteros   Spain 6 1991 1976
3 Peter Oosterhuis   England 4 1974 1971
T4 Rory McIlroy   Northern Ireland 3 2015 2012
Sandy Lyle   Scotland 3 1985 1979
Bernard Hunt   England 3 1965 1958
Bobby Locke   South Africa 3 1954 1946
T8 Henrik Stenson   Sweden 2 2016 2013
Lee Westwood   England 2 2009 2000
Ernie Els   South Africa 2 2004 2003
Retief Goosen   South Africa 2 2002 2001
Nick Faldo   England 2 1992 1983
Ian Woosnam   Wales 2 1990 1987
Bernhard Langer   West Germany 2 1984 1981
Neil Coles   England 2 1970 1963
Peter Alliss   England 2 1966 1964
Christy O'Connor   Ireland 2 1962 1961
Dai Rees   Wales 2 1959 1955
Harry Weetman   England 2 1956 1952
Charlie Ward   England 2 1949 1948

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Harry Vardon Memorial Trophy". The Times. 10 September 1937. p. 5.
  2. ^ "Harry Vardon Memorial Trophy". The Times. 13 September 1937. p. 6.
  3. ^ "Harry Vardon Memorial Trophy – C A Whitcombe's fine average". The Times. 1 October 1937. p. 5.
  4. ^ "Golf – The Harry Vardon Trophy". The Times. 13 January 1938. p. 6.
  5. ^ "The "Vardon" Trophy". The Times. 20 August 1938. p. 3.
  6. ^ "The Harry Vardon Trophy". The Times. 19 August 1939. p. 5.
  7. ^ "The Harry Vardon Trophy – final placings". The Times. 2 September 1939. p. 3.
  8. ^ "Golf – Locke wins Harry Vardon Trophy". The Times. 20 September 1946. p. 8.
  9. ^ "Harry Vardon Trophy – Von Nida's success". The Times. 9 September 1947. p. 2.
  10. ^ "Golf – Harry Vardon Trophy". The Times. 15 September 1948. p. 2.
  11. ^ "Golf - Oosterhuis heads merit list". The Times. 6 November 1971. p. 15.

External linksEdit