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Gerardus Johannes "Hans" Wijers (born 11 January 1951) is a retired Dutch politician of the Democrats 66 (D66) party and businessman. He is the chairman of the supervisory board of the ING Group since 2018.

Hans Wijers
Hans Wijers 2010.jpg
Hans Wijers in 2010
Minister of Finance
In office
4 June 1996 – 26 June 1996
Ad interim
Prime MinisterWim Kok
Preceded byGerrit Zalm
Succeeded byGerrit Zalm
Minister of Economic Affairs
In office
22 August 1994 – 3 August 1998
Prime MinisterWim Kok
Preceded byKoos Andriessen
Succeeded byAnnemarie Jorritsma
Personal details
Born
Gerardus Johannes Wijers

(1951-01-11) 11 January 1951 (age 68)
Oostburg, Netherlands
NationalityDutch
Political partyDemocrats 66 (since 1976)
Domestic partnerEdith Sijmons (since 1988)
Children2 children
ResidenceAmsterdam, Netherlands
Zoutelande, Netherlands
Alma materUniversity of Groningen
(Bachelor of Economics, Master of Economics)
Erasmus University Rotterdam
(Doctor of Philosophy)
OccupationPolitician · Civil servant · Economist · Businessman · Corporate director · Nonprofit director · Sport administrator · Academic administrator · Management consultant · Professor

Contents

Early lifeEdit

After secondary school at Hogere Burgerschool (HBS-B) level, Wijers studied Economics at the University of Groningen, where he graduated Cum Laude in 1976. As assistant professor, he taught Economics at the Erasmus University, and in 1982 received a doctorate for his research in "Industrial politics: the design of governmental policy for industrial sectors".[1][2]

Civil serviceEdit

From 1982 till 1984, Wijers worked as a civil servant at the ministry of Social Affairs and Labour and later at the ministry of Economic Affairs. Subsequently, he became a management consultant at, amongst others, Horringa & De Koning, which later became part of Boston Consulting Group.

PoliticsEdit

Wijers, since 1976 member of D66, was asked in 1994 by D66 foreman Hans van Mierlo (D66) for a ministerial post in the Cabinet Kok I. As Minister of Economic Affairs he was responsible for the law change regarding the extending of shop opening hours, and the coined the Competition Regulation law which triggered the foundation of the Dutch Competition Authority. An important event in his ministry was the bankruptcy of the Fokker aircraft factory in March 1996. When Wijers refused further state aid due to a lack of a clear future perspective, German company DASA withdrew as parent company.

By the end of the cabinet period, Hans van Mierlo had decided not to be eligible for re-election. The party leaders exercised strong pressure on the popular Wijers to take on the party leadership. When the second purple cabinet (Cabinet-Kok II) was formed after the elections in 1998, Wijers expressed that he had no interest in a second term as minister.

BusinessEdit

In 1999 Wijers picked up his old career as a consultant: he became senior partner and chairman of the Dutch branch of the consulting firm The Boston Consulting Group. In July 2002 he became a member of the Board of Directors of Akzo Nobel NV and on 1 May 2003 he became Chairman of the Board of Directors. He succeeded Kees van Lede. Under his leadership the pharmacy branch of Organon, (Organon BioSciences), was sold in 2007 and the British ICI was acquired. AkzoNobel focused more to paint and chemistry. At the end of April 2012 he decided to resign as chairman of the board. He was succeeded by Ton Büchner.[3]

Wijers has been non-executive director at Royal Dutch Shell since January 2009; he later became vice-chairman. He is President of Heineken and supervisory director at HAL Holding NV. He is also chairman of the Vereniging Natuurmonumenten and Chairman of the Supervisory Board of the Royal Concertgebouw NV. In 2010 he was chairman of the jury of the Libris Literature Prize. In 2013 he was chairman of the National Committee inauguration for King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands.

PersonalEdit

Wijers is living together and has two children.

DecorationsEdit

Honours
Ribbon bar Honour Country Date Comment
  Officer of the Order of Orange-Nassau Netherlands 30 October 1998

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Hans Wijers, Chief Executive Officer". AkzoNobel. 2009. Archived from the original on 28 December 2008. Retrieved 12 March 2009.
  2. ^ "Dr. G.J. Wijers". Parlementair Documentatie Centrum (PDC UL) of Leiden University. Retrieved 19 April 2019.
  3. ^ "AkzoNobel CEO Hans Wijers to leave 2012 – Ton Büchner to succeed" (Press release). Akzo Nobel NV. 10 June 2011. Retrieved 19 April 2019.

External linksEdit

Official
Political offices
Preceded by
Koos Andriessen
Minister of Economic Affairs
1994–1998
Succeeded by
Annemarie Jorritsma
Preceded by
Gerrit Zalm
Minister of Finance
Ad interim

1996
Succeeded by
Gerrit Zalm
Business positions
Preceded by
Unknown
CEO and Chairman of the
Boston Consulting
Group Netherlands

1999–2001
Succeeded by
Unknown
Preceded by
Kees van Lede
CEO and Chairman of
AkzoNobel

2003–2012
Succeeded by
Ton Büchner
Preceded by
Unknown
Vice Chairman of
Royal Dutch Shell

2009–2018
Succeeded by
Gerard Kleisterlee
Preceded by
Steven ten Have
Chairman of the
Supervisory board of
AFC Ajax N.V.

2012–2015
Succeeded by
Leo van Wijk
Preceded by
Kees van Lede
Chairman of the
Supervisory board of
Heineken N.V.

2012–present
Succeeded by
Jean-Marc Huët
Preceded by
Jeroen van der Veer
Chairman of the
Supervisory board of the
ING Group

2018–present
Incumbent
Non-profit organization positions
Preceded by
Ed Nijpels
Chairman of the
Netherlands World Wide
Fund for Nature

1999–2003
Succeeded by
Ruud Lubbers
Preceded by
Office established
Chairman of the
Orange Foundation

2002–2011
Succeeded by
Joop Wijn
Preceded by
Cees Veerman
Chairman of the
Vereniging Natuurmonumenten

2011–present
Incumbent
Preceded by
Alexander Rinnooy Kan
Chairman of the
Concertgebouw Foundation

2015–present