Hamilton Kerr

Sir Hamilton William Kerr, 1st Baronet (1 August 1903 – 26 December 1974) was a British Conservative Party politician and journalist.

Sir Hamilton Kerr, Bt
Member of Parliament for Cambridge
In office
1950–1966
Preceded byArthur Symonds
Succeeded byRobert Davies
Member of Parliament for Oldham
In office
1931–1945
Serving with Anthony Crossley (1931-1935)
John Dodd (1935–1945)
Preceded byJames Wilson
Gordon Lang
Succeeded byLeslie Hale
Frank Fairhurst
Personal details
Born
Hamilton William Kerr

(1903-08-01)1 August 1903
Died24 December 1974(1974-12-24) (aged 71)
Political partyConservative
RelationsCharles Greville, 3rd Baron Greville (stepfather)
ParentsHenry S. Kerr
Olive Grace Kerr
EducationEton College
Alma materBalliol College, Oxford

Early lifeEdit

Kerr was born on 1 August 1903. He was second son born to Americans Olive (née Grace) Kerr and banker Henry Scanlan Kerr of Long Island.[1] After his father's death, his mother remarried to Charles Greville, shortly thereafter the 3rd Baron Greville.[2] His older brother was Henry Grace Kerr,[1] who was killed in France during World War I.[3] His paternal grandparents were William Henry Kerr and Harriet Ellen (née Scanlan) Kerr. His mother was a niece of Michael P. Grace and Mayor William Russell Grace, founder of W. R. Grace and Company.[2]

He was educated at Eton and Balliol College, Oxford.[4]

CareerEdit

After his graduation from Oxford, he then took up a career in journalism and worked on the Daily Mail and the Daily Telegraph.[4]

At the 1931 general election, he was elected as the Member of Parliament for the Oldham constituency in Lancashire. He held the seat until losing it to Labour at the 1945 general election. In the 1930s, Kerr served as Parliamentary Private Secretary to Alfred Duff Cooper, starting in 1933 when Cooper was Financial Secretary to the War Office.[4] During the Second World War, he served in a balloon squadron in the Royal Air Force and briefly held office as Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Health in the 1945 caretaker government.[5]

At the 1950 general election, he was returned to the House of Commons as the MP for Cambridge, holding that seat until his retirement at the 1966 general election. In 1954, Kerr was appointed Parliamentary Private Secretary to the future Prime Minister Harold Macmillan.[5]

Kerr was made a Baronet, of Cambridge in the County of Cambridge, in 1957. The title became extinct upon his death in 1974.

LegacyEdit

The Hamilton Kerr Institute was established in 1976 in the riverside property given to Cambridge University for the Fitzwilliam Museum and endowed by Sir Hamilton Kerr.[6] The HKI provides art conservation services and training.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Henry S. Kerr Left Over $1,000,000" (PDF). The New York Times. 26 November 1907. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  2. ^ a b TIMES, Special Cable to THE NEW YORK (27 October 1909). "MRS. HENRY S. KERR TO WED.; To Become the Bride of the Hon. Charles Greville on Nov. 24" (PDF). The New York Times. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  3. ^ "Lieut. H.G. Kerr Killed in Action" (PDF). The New York Times. 7 July 1917. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  4. ^ a b c Dod's Parliamentary Companion for 1936. London: P. S. King & Son Ltd. 1936. p. 386.
  5. ^ a b The Times House of Commons 1955. London: The Times Office. 1955. p. 70.
  6. ^ Hamilton Kerr Institute: History

External linksEdit

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
James Wilson
Gordon Lang
Member of Parliament for Oldham
19311945
With: Anthony Crossley, to 1935
John Dodd, (1935–1945)
Succeeded by
Leslie Hale
Frank Fairhurst
Preceded by
Arthur Symonds
Member of Parliament for Cambridge
19501966
Succeeded by
Robert Davies
Baronetage of the United Kingdom
New creation Baronet
1957–1974
Extinct