Fujiwara no Fusasaki

Fujiwara no Fusasaki (藤原 房前, 681 – May 25, 737) was a member of the Fujiwara clan and the founder of the Hokke branch of the Fujiwara.[1]

Fujiwara no Fusasaki
Born681
Died737
NationalityJapanese
ParentsFujiwara no Fuhito (father)

CareerEdit

Fusasaki was a Sangi (associate counselor) in the Daijō-kan.[2]

He founded the temple of Sugimoto-dera in Kamakura in 734 with the priest Gyōki (668–749). The temple's legend holds that Empress Komyo (701–760) in the Nara Period (710–794) instructed Fusasaki, the then high-ranking minister, and a famous priest named Gyoki (668–749) to build the temple enshrining a statue of Eleven-Headed Kan'non, or Ekadasamukha in Sanskrit, as the main object of worship. Priest Gyoki fashioned the statue himself because he was also a great sculptor.[3]

Fusasaki died during a major smallpox epidemic in 737.[1][2]

FamilyEdit

  • Father: Fujiwara no Fuhito (藤原不比等, 659–720)
  • Mother: Soga no Shōshi (蘇我娼子, ?–?), daughter of Soga no Murajiko (蘇我連子)
  • Main-wife (seishitsu): Muro no O-Okimi (牟漏女王, ?–746), daughter of Minu-Ō (美努王)
Order Name Japanese Lifetime
2nd son Fujiwara no Nagate 藤原永手 714–771
3rd son Fujiwara no Matate 藤原真楯 715–766
6th son Fujiwara no Mitate 藤原御楯 ? –764
daughter wife of Emperor Shōmu 北殿 ? –760
  • Wife: Daughter of Kusagunokura no Oyu (春日倉老)
Order Name Japanese Lifetime
1st son Fujiwara no Torikai 藤原鳥養 ? – ?
  • Wife: Daughter of (片野朝臣)
Order Name Japanese Lifetime
4th son Fujiwara no Kiyokawa 藤原清河 ? –778
5th son Fujiwara no Uona 藤原魚名 721–783
  • Wife: Daughter of (阿波采)
Order Name Japanese Lifetime
7th son Fujiwara no Kaedemaro 藤原楓麻呂 723–776
  • Children with unknown mother:
Order Name Japanese Lifetime
daughter wife of Fujiwara no Toyonari 藤原豊成室 ? – ?
daughter Fujiwara no Ohirako 藤原宇比良古 ? – 762

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b Nussbaum, Louis-Frédéric. (2005). "Fujiwara no Fusasaki" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 202, p. 202, at Google Books; Brinkley, Frank et al. (1915). A History of the Japanese People from the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era, p. 203., p. 203, at Google Books
  2. ^ a b Titsingh, Isaac. (1834). Annales des empereurs du japon, p. 224., p. 69, at Google Books
  3. ^ "Sugimoto-dera". July 2002. Retrieved 2009-04-19.

ReferencesEdit