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The flag of Kenya (Swahili: Bendera ya Kenya) is a tricolour of black, red, and green with two white edges imposed with a red, white and black Maasai shield and two crossed spears. The flag is based on that of Kenya African National Union and was officially adopted on 12 December 1963 after Kenya's independence.[1]

Kenya
Flag of Kenya.svg
UseNational flag, civil and state ensign
Proportion2:3
Adopted12 December 1963
DesignA horizontal tricolour of black, white-edged red, and green with two crossed white spears behind a red, white, and black Maasai shield.

Contents

HistoryEdit

The Kenyan flag is based on the black over red over green flag of Kenya African National Union (KANU), the political party that led the fight for freedom and independence of Kenya. Upon independence, the white fimbriation, symbolising peace and unity, and the shield were added. The meaning of the colours of the flag of Kenya match closely to those of the Pan-African flag adopted by the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League in 1920.[2]

SymbolismEdit

The colour black represents the people of the Republic of Kenya, red for the blood shed during the fight for independence, and green for the country's landscape and natural wealth. The white fimbriation was added later to symbolize peace and honesty. The black, red, and white traditional Maasai shield and two spears symbolise the defense of all the things mentioned above.

DesignEdit

 
Construction sheet

The colours of the flag have been specified by the Kenya National Archives. [3]

Black Red Green
British Standard Colours Post office red
0-006
0-10

VariantsEdit

ExecutiveEdit

Defence ForcesEdit

County flagsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Flag of Kenya". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2018-09-03.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-09-13. Retrieved 2010-09-27. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ "Kenya Flag and Kenya National Anthem - Symbols of Nationhood". Retrieved 2018-09-03.

SourcesEdit


External linksEdit