Evergreen Cemetery (Hillside, New Jersey)

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Evergreen Cemetery and Crematory is a cemetery and crematorium located at 1137 North Broad Street, Hillside, Union County, New Jersey. Parts of it are in Hillside, Elizabeth, and Newark.[2]

Evergreen Cemetery
EVERGREEN CEMETERY, UNION COUNTY.jpg
Evergreen Cemetery (Hillside, New Jersey) is located in Union County, New Jersey
Evergreen Cemetery (Hillside, New Jersey)
LocationElizabeth, Hillside
and Newark, New Jersey, United States
Coordinates40°41′32″N 74°12′39″W / 40.69222°N 74.21083°W / 40.69222; -74.21083Coordinates: 40°41′32″N 74°12′39″W / 40.69222°N 74.21083°W / 40.69222; -74.21083
Area115 acres (47 hectares)
ArchitectMultiple
Architectural styleMid-19th-century revival, late-19th- and 20th-century revivals, late Victorian
NRHP reference No.91000882 [1]
Added to NRHPJuly 9, 1991 (30 years ago) (1991-07-09)

The cemetery is listed on both the New Jersey Register[3] and the National Register of Historic Places,[4] since 1991.[5]

Notable graves include authors Stephen Crane, Mary Mapes Dodge and Edward Stratemeyer. Six former U.S. Congressmen (including one who became Senator) and one non-voting delegate (from Alaska) are buried there as well.

The cemetery also is known for having a section of plots devoted to Romani "gypsy" families.[6][7][8]

It is adjacent to Weequahic Golf Course.

King of the Gypsies was filmed there with Shelley Winters.[9]

Notable intermentsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  2. ^ See USGS Topo for county lines.
  3. ^ ID #2681
  4. ^ Reference #91000882
  5. ^ New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places: Union County Archived April 7, 2009, at the Wayback Machine. New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Historic Preservation Office, last updated August 6, 2007. Retrieved August 26, 2007.
  6. ^ "Kings? Queens? Palm readers? Meet the City's Hidden Gypsies". Charles Cummings.
  7. ^ Anndee Hochman (August 18, 1984). "Friends Mourn Falls Church Gypsy Known as Musician, Peacemaker". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C. ISSN 0190-8286. OCLC 1330888409.
  8. ^ "Strolling the Serpentine Paths at Evergreen Cemetery".
  9. ^ "Glimpse of History: When Hollywood came to Hillside". www.nj.com. May 2015.
  10. ^ John Brisbin, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved August 13, 2007.
  11. ^ William Chetwood, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved August 13, 2007.
  12. ^ Amos Clark, Jr., Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved August 13, 2007.
  13. ^ a b c "Sometimes the Grave Is a Fine and Public Place". The New York Times. March 28, 2004. Go to Evergreen Cemetery in Hillside and you will find a writers' warren. Perhaps the most famous is Stephen Crane, who grew up in Asbury Park and is best known for The Red Badge of Courage. Also there is Mary Mapes Dodge, who was said to never have been to Europe before writing Hans Brinker, or the Silver Skates. And though the achievement of another resident, Edward Stratemeyer, may not be in the realm of Mr. Crane's, his creations include Nancy Drew, the Bobbsey Twins and the Hardy Boys.
  14. ^ "Barton Wood Currie Collection, 1918-1948: Finding Aid". Princeton University Library. 2009. Archived from the original on June 19, 2010.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  15. ^ "Gen. J. Madison Drake Dies" (PDF). The New York Times. November 29, 1913. Retrieved May 29, 2011.
  16. ^ Civil War index. Retrieved May 29, 2011.
  17. ^ Phineas Jones, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved August 13, 2007.
  18. ^ John Kean, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved August 13, 2007.
  19. ^ "AOTW". Retrieved May 30, 2011.
  20. ^ www.gettysburg.stonesentinels.com http://www.gettysburg.stonesentinels.com/NJ/11NJ.php. Retrieved May 30, 2011. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  21. ^ "11th New Jersey". civilwarintheeast.com. Retrieved May 30, 2011.
  22. ^ Charles August Sulzer, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved August 13, 2007.
  23. ^ William Sulzer, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved August 13, 2007.
  24. ^ "Ex-Army Officer's Funeral Tomorrow". Los Angeles Times. Los Angeles, CA. April 13, 1930. p. IV-7 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "U.S. Department of War, Headstone Applications for Military Veterans, 1925-1970, Entry for Homer W. Wheeler". Ancestry.com. Lehi, UT: Ancestry.com LLC. October 29, 1930. Retrieved September 6, 2021.

External linksEdit