Euroflag

Euroflag was a collaboration of European aerospace companies formed for the development of the Future Large Aircraft project which was eventually to result in the Airbus A400M Atlas. Development eventually moved under the stewardship of Airbus Defence and Space.

Euroflag
IndustryAerospace
PredecessorFIMA
Successor
Founded1991
DefunctJanuary 1999 (1999-01)[citation needed]
Headquarters
Rome
,
Italy
ProductsFuture Large Aircraft

HistoryEdit

OriginsEdit

The project began as the Future International Military Airlifter (FIMA) group, set up in 1982 by; Aérospatiale, British Aerospace, Lockheed and Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm to develop a replacement for the C-130 Hercules and C-160 Transall.[1][verification needed] Varying requirements and the complications of international politics caused slow progress. In 1989, Lockheed left the group, and went on to develop the second-generation C-130J Super Hercules.

FormationEdit

In July 1991 with the addition of Alenia Aeronautica, CASA, OGMA, and TAI of Turkey the Future International Military Airlifter group became Euroflag, European future large aircraft group.[2][3] a joint-venture company based in Rome.[4]

SuccessionEdit

1995 saw the FLA military transport project in charge of requirement-definition and selection processes with Airbus Military eventually taking over the project.[5]

ParticipantsEdit

  • Aerospatiale (France)
  • Alenia (Italy)
  • British Aerospace (United Kingdom)
  • CASA (Spain)
  • Deutsche Airbus (Germany)
  • SONACA (Belgium)
  • SABCA (Belgium)
  • OGMA (Portugal)
  • TAI (Turkey)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ahmed Khairy Noor, Samuel L. Venneri (eds.). Future Aeronautical and Space Systems. p. 114–116.CS1 maint: uses editors parameter (link)
  2. ^ Díez, López; Tornell, Asenjo (3 October 2018). "A400M aircraft. Design Requirements & Conceptual Definition" (PDF). Airbus. Historical background of A400M (1). Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 September 2019.
  3. ^ "About the Atlas (A400M)". Royal Air Force. Archived from the original on 25 July 2019. Retrieved 19 September 2019.
  4. ^ "Euroflag". Flight International. 6 October 1993. pp. 42–43. Archived from the original on 31 December 2012. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  5. ^ 2015, Nini & Kübler, p. 15.

SourcesEdit