FC Erzgebirge Aue

  (Redirected from Erzgebirge Aue)

Fußball Club Erzgebirge Aue e.V., commonly known as simply FC Erzgebirge Aue or Erzgebirge Aue, is a German football club based in Aue-Bad Schlema, Saxony. The former East German side was a founding member of the 3. Liga in 2008–09, after being relegated from the 2. Bundesliga in 2007–08. The city of Aue-Bad Schlema has a population of about 20,800, making it one of the smallest cities to ever host a club playing at the second highest level of German football. However, the team attracts supporters from a larger urban area that includes Chemnitz and Zwickau, whose own football sides (CFC and FSV) are among Aue's traditional rivals.

Erzgebirge Aue
FC Erzgebirge Aue logo.svg
Full nameFußball Club Erzgebirge Aue e.V.
Nickname(s)Veilchen (Violets)
Founded4 March 1946; 74 years ago (1946-03-04)
GroundErzgebirgsstadion
Capacity16,485
ChairmanHelge Leonhardt
ManagerDirk Schuster
League2. Bundesliga
2019–202. Bundesliga, 7th of 18
WebsiteClub website
Current season

HistoryEdit

1945–1963: East Germany's dominant sideEdit

 
Historical chart of Erzgebirge league performance

The club was founded as SG Aue in 1945, and on 1 November 1948 became BSG Pneumatik Aue under the sponsorship of the local construction tool works. Changes in sponsorship led to a change in name to BSG Zentra Wismut Aue in 1949 and then simply to BSG Wismut Aue in 1951.[1]

 
Historical logo of Wismut Aue

The club performed well, advancing through third- and second-tier play to the DDR-Oberliga in 1951. BSG Wismut Aue finished as national vice-champions in 1953 losing in a final to SG Dynamo Dresden by a score of 2–3.

The central sports association SV Wismut founded sports club SC Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt in the nearby city of Chemnitz – recently renamed Karl-Marx-Stadt – in 1954. The East German government urged that Karl-Marx-Stadt deserved a quality football team and plans were made for the football department of BSG Wismut Aue to move to Karl-Marx-Stadt and be incorporated into the new sports club SC Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt. However, local miners protested and players threatened to strike, leading to a partial abandonment of the plan.[2] The football department of BSG Wismut Aue was still delegated to SC Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt, but the team would continue to play their matches at the Otto-Grotewohl-Stadion in Aue.[2]

It was during this time that the club became a dominant force in East German football. They won the 1955 East German Cup and followed it up with four DDR-Oberliga titles in 1955, 1956, 1957 and 1959. They also competed in the 1959 East German Cup final, but lost 2–3 in a replay against SC Dynamo Berlin, following the clubs' 0–0 draw in the final.[3] Those successes led to Aue's participation in the European Champion Clubs' Cup in 1958, 1959 and 1961.

1963–1991: With the DDR-Oberliga to the endEdit

SC Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt merged with SC Motor Karl-Marx-Stadt to form SC Karl-Marx-Stadt in 1963. Since SC Motor Karl-Marx-Stadt had brought their own football department, the football department of SC Wismut Karl-Marx-Stadt, once delegated from Aue, got back their independence and could be rejoined with BSG Wismut Aue.

The team continued to enjoy modest success by staying up in the top-tier DDR-Oberliga, and, although it did not win another championship, it holds the record for the most games played by any team in that league. Aue sits 4th on the all-time DDR-Oberliga list and over the course of thirty-eight years played more games (1,019 matches) than any other East German side. Just behind them, 6th place Rot-Weiß Erfurt played 1,001 matches.

BSG Wismut Aue also played in the UEFA Cup tournament in 1985–86 and 1987–88, going out in the first round against Dnipro Dnipropetrovsk in their first appearance and in the second round against Albanian side Flamurtari Vlorë in their second.[4][5] After German reunification in 1990, the club was renamed FC Wismut Aue before taking on its current name, FC Erzgebirge Aue in 1993. The name "Erzgebirge", Ore Mountains in English, recognizes that the club's home is located in the western part of these mountains. Aue was relegated to the DDR-Liga Staffel B in the 1989–90 season, so it was admitted to the NOFV-Oberliga Süd, which was the fourth tier of the German League between 1991 and 200 8, in the 1991–92 season.

1991–2003: Playing in united GermanyEdit

In the combined football leagues of the newly united Germany, Aue began playing in the NOFV-Oberliga Süd (IV). They competed in the DFB-Pokal for the first time in 1992. With the establishment of the Regionalliga Nordost (III) in 1994, Aue qualified for the new league. The club was moved to the Regionalliga Nord in 2000, and after a surprising league title there in 2003, they were promoted to the 2. Bundesliga.

2003–present: 2. BundesligaEdit

Following a Regionalliga Nord title, Erzgebirge Aue were promoted to the 2. Bundesliga where they delivered mid-table performances in their first three seasons, but suffered relegation back to the third tier in 2008.[6][7]

Aue became part of the new 3. Liga in the 2008 season. They finished runner-up in the league in their second season there, earning promotion back to the 2. Bundesliga. After a fifth-place finish in their first season back, the club struggled against relegation, finishing in the lower third of the table for the following few seasons.[7]

On 6 February 2015, in a 2–0 home victory against RB Leipzig, Aue fans displayed two banners comparing RB Leipzig to Nazis.[8] Aue were fined £25,000 for it and it was ruled that two blocks in their stadium be closed for 12 months.[9] In the 2014–15 season, they were relegated back to the 3. Liga,[10] only to be promoted back to the 2. Bundesliga the following season.[11] The 2016–17 season saw Aue finish 14th,[12] whilst they finished 16th in the 2017–18 season.[13] They finished 14th in the 2018–19 season.[14]

Reserve teamEdit

The second team side of Wismut Aue played in the DDR-Liga (II) through the first half of the 1970s and had a single season turn there in 1985–86. They also made more than a half dozen appearances in the early rounds of FDGB Pokal (East German Cup) play between 1968 and 1991.

Since 2008 the club's reserve team, now the FC Erzgebirge Aue II, played in the tier five NOFV-Oberliga Süd with a fifth-place finish in 2014 as its best result. At the end of the 2014–15 season the team was withdrawn from competitive football despite finishing eighth in the league.[15]

The team also made a losing appearance in the 1991 and 2007 Saxony Cup final.

Recent seasonsEdit

The recent season-by-season performance of the club:[6][7]

Year Division Tier Position
1999–00 Regionalliga Nordost III 3rd
2000–01 Regionalliga Nord 7th
2001–02 Regionalliga Nord 9th
2002–03 Regionalliga Nord 1st ↑
2003–04 2. Bundesliga II 8th
2004–05 2. Bundesliga 7th
2005–06 2. Bundesliga 7th
2006–07 2. Bundesliga 10th
2007–08 2. Bundesliga 16th ↓
2008–09 3. Liga III 12th
2009–10 3. Liga 2nd ↑
2010–11 2. Bundesliga II 5th
2011–12 2. Bundesliga 15th
2012–13 2. Bundesliga 15th
2013–14 2. Bundesliga 14th
2014–15 2. Bundesliga 17th ↓
2015–16 3. Liga III 2nd ↑
2016–17 2. Bundesliga II 14th
2017–18 2. Bundesliga 16th
2018–19 2. Bundesliga 14th
2019–20 2. Bundesliga 7th
2020–21 2. Bundesliga
Key
Promoted Relegated

PlayersEdit

Current squadEdit

As of 28 August, 2020

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK   GER Martin Männel (captain)
2 DF   FRA Gaëtan Bussmann
4 DF   GER Fabian Kalig
5 MF   GER Clemens Fandrich
6 DF   GER Florian Ballas
7 MF   GER Jan Hochscheidt
8 MF   GER Tom Baumgart
10 FW   AZE Dimitrij Nazarov
11 FW   GER Florian Krüger
12 DF   GER Steve Breitkreuz
13 MF   GER Louis Samson
14 FW   AUT Philipp Zulechner
No. Pos. Nation Player
16 MF   GER Erik Majetschak
17 MF   GER Philipp Riese
20 DF   GER Calogero Rizzuto
21 DF   GER Malcolm Cacutalua
24 MF   PHI John-Patrick Strauß
25 GK   GER Philipp Klewin
26 DF   GER Sören Gonther
31 FW   GER Ben Zolinski
33 MF   BIH Ognjen Gnjatić
34 GK   KOR Kevin Harr
37 FW   GER Pascal Testroet
40 GK   GER Jean-Marie Plath

Out on loanEdit

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
No. Pos. Nation Player

HonoursEdit

  • Denotes achieved by reserve team.

Notable playersEdit

InternationalsEdit

  East Germany internationals
  • Bernhard Konik – 1 cap – (1984)
  • Bringfried Müller – 18 caps – (1955–60)
  • Dieter Erler – 47 caps – (1959–68; 25 LS for Aue)
  • Erhard Bauer – 3 caps – (1954)
  • Harald Mothes – 1 cap – (1984)
  • Horst Freitag – 1 cap – (1957)
  • Jörg Weißflog – 15 caps – (1984–89)
  • Karl Wolf – 10 caps – (1954–57)
  • Klaus Thiele – 4 caps – (1958–59)
  • Konrad Wagner – 4 caps – (1959–63)
  • Manfred Kaiser – 31 caps – (1955–64)
  • Siegfried Wolf – 17 caps – (1955–59)
  • Steffen Krauß – 2 caps – (1985)
  • Willi Marquardt – 1 cap – (1956; for Rotation Babelsberg)
  • Willy Tröger – 15 caps – (1954–59)
Other national teams

Manager historyEdit

  • Kurt Gogsch (1946–50)
  • Walter Fritzsch (1950 – May 1952)
  • Rolf Kukowitsch (May – June 1952)
  • Karl Dittes (July 1952 – Aug 1955)
  • Fritz Gödicke (Aug 1955–31 May 1958)
  • Günter Horst (1 June – Sept 1958)
  • Gerhard Hofmann (Sept 1958 – July 1960)
  • Manfred Fuchs (July 1960–4 March 1962)
  • Armin Günther (10 March 1962 – 30 June 1965)
  • Bringfried Müller (1 July 1965 – 10 November 1967)
  • Gerhard Hofmann (10 Nov 1967 – 30 June 1971)
  • Bringfried Müller (23 July 1971 – 30 June 1977)
  • Manfred Fuchs (1 July 1977 – 30 June 1981)
  • Hans-Ulrich Thomale (1 July 1981 – 30 June 1985)
  • Harald Fischer (1 July 1985 – 12 October 1985)
  • Konrad Schaller (13 Oct 1985 – 31 December 1985)
  • Hans Speth (1 Jan 1986 – 16 April 1988)
  • Jürgen Escher (23 April 1988 – 30 June 1988)
  • Ulrich Schulze (1 July 1988 – Dec 1989)
  • Jürgen Escher (Jan – Nov 1990)
  • Klaus Toppmöller (28 Nov 1990 – 30 June 1991)

European recordEdit

as SC Wismut Karl-Marx-StadtEdit

Season Competition Round Nation Club Score
1957–58 European Clubs' Champions Cup PR   Gwardia Warszawa 1–3, 3–1, 1–1
R16   Ajax 1–3, 0–1
1958–59 European Clubs' Champions Cup PR   Petrolul Ploiești 4–2, 0–2, 4–0
R16   IFK Göteborg 2–2, 4–0
QF   Young Boys 2–2, 0–0, 1–2
1960–61 European Clubs' Champions Cup R16   Glenavon walkover
QF   Rapid Wien 1–3, 2–0, 0–1

as BSG Wismut AueEdit

Season Competition Round Nation Club Score
1985–86 UEFA Cup 1/32   Dniprou Dnipropetrovsk 1–3, 1–2
1987–88 UEFA Cup 1/32   Valur 0–0, 1–1
1/16   Flamurtari Vlorë 1–0, 0–2

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ *Grüne, Hardy (2001). Vereinslexikon. Kassel: AGON Sportverlag ISBN 3-89784-147-9
  2. ^ a b Dennis, Mike; Grix, Jonathan (2012). Sport Under Communism: Behind the East German 'Miracle'. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. p. 140. ISBN 978-0-230-22784-2. OCLC 779529923.
  3. ^ "East Germany 1959". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  4. ^ "The UEFA Cup 1985/86 – BSG Wismut Aue (GDR)". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  5. ^ "The UEFA Cup 1987/88 – BSG Wismut Aue (GDR)". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  6. ^ a b Das deutsche Fußball-Archiv (in German) Historical German domestic league tables
  7. ^ a b c FC Erzgebirge Aue at Fussball.de (in German) Tables and results of all German football leagues
  8. ^ "Football club condemns fans' Nazi banners". thelocal.de. 9 February 2015. Retrieved 29 December 2019.
  9. ^ "German side Erzgebirge Aue fined for banner comparing RB Leipzig to Nazis". The Guardian. 13 March 2015. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 29 December 2019.
  10. ^ "Spieltag/Tabelle". DFB – Deutscher Fußball-Bund e.V. (in German). Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  11. ^ "Spieltag/Tabelle". DFB – Deutscher Fußball-Bund e.V. (in German). Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  12. ^ "Spieltag/Tabelle". DFB – Deutscher Fußball-Bund e.V. (in German). Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  13. ^ "Spieltag/Tabelle". DFB – Deutscher Fußball-Bund e.V. (in German). Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  14. ^ "Spieltag/Tabelle". DFB – Deutscher Fußball-Bund e.V. (in German). Retrieved 28 December 2019.
  15. ^ NOFV-Oberliga Süd tables and results 1994–present (in German) Fussballdaten.de. Retrieved 24 February 2014

External linksEdit