Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 2000

  (Redirected from Envie de vivre)

Belgium was represented by Nathalie Sorce with the song "Envie de vivre" at the 2000 Eurovision Song Contest, which took place in Stockholm on 13 May. Sorce was the winner of the Belgian national final for the contest, held in Brussels on 18 February.

Eurovision Song Contest 2000
Country Belgium
National selection
Selection processFinale Nationale Concours Eurovision de la Chanson 2000
Selection date(s)18 February 2000
Selected entrantNathalie Sorce
Selected song"Envie de vivre"
Selected songwriter(s)Silvio Pezzuto
Finals performance
Final result24th, 2 points
Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest
◄1999 2000 2002►

French-language broadcaster RTBF was in charge of the selection of the Belgian entry for the 2000 Contest.

Before EurovisionEdit

Finale Nationale Concours Eurovision de la Chanson 2000Edit

The final took place on 18 February 2000 at the RTBF Studio 6, hosted by Jean-Pierre Hautier. A public televote determined the winner, "Envie de vivre" performed by Nathalie Sorce. The results of the public televote were revealed by Belgium's six regions (four Walloon provinces with votes from Namur and Luxembourg being combined, a "Rest of Belgium" region covering the five Flemish provinces, and Brussels) and led to the victory of Sorce by a margin of over 3,500 votes.[1]

Final – 18 February 2000
Draw Artist Song Songwriter(s) Televote Place
1 Maria Canel "Et si..." Maria Canel Ferreiro, Patrice de Matos de Morais 2,518 10
2 Géraldine Cozier "Ma voie" Geraldine Cozier, Cécile Delamarre, Pascal Noel, Philippe Libois 8,371 5
3 Gerlando "Rêve" Fernando de Meersman, Hughes Maréchal 4,002 9
4 Sabrina Klinkenberg "Tout ce que je suis" Alexis Vanderheyden, Jacques Broun 11,085 3
5 La Teuf "Soldat de l'amour" Alec Mansion 6,216 6
6 Mezzo Mezzo "Belgicanos" Silvio Pezzuto, Michel Ianiri, Juan Gonzalez 10,750 4
7 Christel Pagnoul "Pour la vie" Francis Goya, Ralph Benatar, Christel Pagnoul, Valérie Weyer 6,066 7
8 Frédéric Reynaerts "Le nomade m'a dit" Frédéric Reynaerts 17,774 2
9 Nathalie Sorce "Envie de vivre" Silvio Pezzuto 21,362 1
10 Triana "Donne" Roberto D'Angelo, Filippo di Maira 5,270 8
Detailed Regional Televoting Results
Draw Song Walloon
Brabant
Hainaut Namur and
Luxembourg
Liège Rest of
Belgium
Brussels Total
1 "Et si..." 163 63 142 68 48 2,035 2,518
2 "Ma voie" 368 2,042 2,782 1,072 228 1,879 8,371
3 "Rêve" 103 1,313 263 360 563 1,427 4,002
4 "Tout ce que je suis" 292 809 393 7,906 114 1,571 11,085
5 "Soldat de l'amour" 290 727 731 1,489 146 2,833 6,216
6 "Belgicanos" 424 3,962 848 1,109 497 3,910 10,750
7 "Pour la vie" 340 681 221 742 456 3,626 6,066
8 "Le nomade m'a dit" 956 2,497 1,988 3,137 2,225 6,971 17,774
9 "Envie de vivre" 910 8,305 2,243 3,360 950 5,594 21,362
10 "Donne" 91 629 211 3,361 47 931 5,270

ControversyEdit

After the final, there was initially some degree of uncertainty about the disproportionately high number of votes to Sabrina Klinkenberg from the province of Liège, but RTBF subsequently confirmed that it was correct, citing the fact that Klinkenberg was a native of that province as the most probable explanation, and pointing out that Sorce had also received an exceptionally high number of votes from her home province of Hainaut.

At EurovisionEdit

On the night of the final Sorce performed 10th in the running order, following Russia and preceding Cyprus. A somewhat shrill and at times off-key vocal performance, combined with a much-criticised choice of outfit, contributed towards an ignominious result, with only 2 points received and a last place finish of the 24 entrants, the eighth time that Belgium had finished at the foot of the Eurovision scoreboard.[2] The 12 points from the Belgian televote were awarded to Latvia.[3]

VotingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ ESC National Finals database 2000
  2. ^ "Final of Stockholm 2000". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.
  3. ^ ESC History - Belgium 2000
  4. ^ a b "Results of the Final of Stockholm 2000". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 10 April 2021. Retrieved 10 April 2021.

External linksEdit