Emilio Drake, 1st Marquess of Cañada Honda

Emilio María Juan Crisostomo Drake y de la Cerda, 1st Marquess of Cañada Honda (27 January 1855 – 2 July 1915), was a Spanish aristocrat and politician, member of the Congress of Deputies[citation needed] as well as senator for the province of Puerto Rico, a Spanish colony at the time. Closely linked to the Liberal Party, Drake became senator in 1891 and deputy in 1898, being an active member of the Senate's and the Congress' committees regarding public works and infrastructure in Puerto Rico and Peninsular Spain.[1] He was awarded the Grand Cross of the Order of Isabella the Catholic and made Maestrante of Seville.


The Marquess of Cañada Honda
Senator of Puerto Rico
In office
1891-1893
MonarchMaria Christina of Austria, Queen Regent
Member of the Congress of Deputies
In office
1898-1899

1902

1907-1908
MonarchAlfonso XIII of Spain
ConstituencySegovia
Personal details
Born(1855-01-27)27 January 1855
Died2 July 1915(1915-07-02) (aged 60)
Political partyLiberal-Fusionist Party (1891)
Other political
affiliations
Independent (1891-1908)
Spouse(s)Maria Asunción Fernández-Durán y Bernaldo de Quirós
ParentsCarlos Drake y Núñez del Castillo, 1st Count of Vegamar, Viscount of Escambray Virginia De la Cerda y Gand-Villain, 7th Marchioness of Eguaras

Background and family (1855-1893)Edit

Emilio was born in January 1855 into a wealthy aristocratic family. His father, Carlos Guillermo Drake y Núñez del Castillo, Count of Vega Mar and Viscount of Escambray,[2] was the son of a wealthy Englishman, James Ash Drake, who had made his fortune on the Spanish island colony of Cuba in the late eighteenth century. His mother, Carlota, was part of the island's aristocracy (her father was the Marquess of San Felipe y Santiago and later Count of Castillo, Grandee of Spain). In the early 1800s, after the independence of Spanish American possessions, the family emigrated to the Peninsula and settled in Madrid. Carlos married Virginia De la Cerda y Gand-Villain-Rochefoucauld de Bayers, member of the House of De La Cerda, one of Spain's most important noble houses.[3] Virginia was the daughter of José Máximo De La Cerda y Palafox, 6th Count of Parcent, 6th Marquess of Bárboles (, ), cousin to Empress Eugenia of France,[4] and of Marie de Gand-Vilain de La Rochefoucauld-Bayers, Marquise de Bayers, Comtesse du Saint-Empire, a Franco-Spanish aristocrat, granddaughter of the last Prince de la Rochefoucauld-Bayers.[5]

Virginia married Carlos Drake in 1847, the year he was made a count and gentilhombre to Queen Isabella II.[6]

Upon her father's death in 1851, Virginia became 7th Marchioness of Eguaras and was admitted into the Royal Order of Queen Maria Luisa.

The couple had several children:

  • Carlos Drake y De la Cerda, 2nd Count of Vega Mar and 8th Marquess of Eguaras
  • Luis Drake y De la Cerda, married to the daughter of the Counts of Maluque
  • Emilio Drake y De la Cerda, 1st Marquess of Cañada Honda
  • Rosalía Drake y De la Cerda, who married her cousin José Luis De la Cerda, 9th Count of Villar.

The Count of Vega Mar died in 1880. Virginia, the dowager countess died in 1909 getting to meet her grand-granddaughter Maria (later 3rd Marchioness of Cañada Honda).

Marriage and childrenEdit

Emilio Drake married Maria Asunción Fernández-Durán y Bernaldo de Quirós in 1879.[7] The young bride was another member of a prominent aristocratic family: her father was Manuel Fernández-Durán y Pando, 5th Marquess of Perales del Río (G.d.E) and 4th Marquess of Tolosa. The couple had ten children, among them:

  • Francisco de Paula Drake y Fernández-Durán (1880-1936), 2nd Marquess of Cañada Honda, who married Luisa de Santiago Lacave, daughter of General Luis Santiago, Minister of War. He was murdered by communists during the Spanish Civil War[8]
  • Antonia Drake y Fernández-Durán (1888-1868) who married her cousin, Emilio Drake y Redondo, 10th Marquess of Eguaras.

The couple made an acquaintance with Queen Regent Maria Christina and prominent of members of the Liberal Party, such as Antonio Maura (who later became a Conservative). In March 1893, in the context of "caciquismo", electoral strategy based on landlords putting pressure on peasants, Emilio Drake was granted the peerage of Marquess of Cañada Honda in exchange for "whipping" the votes of Segovia, his province, for the Liberal Party.[9] Furthermore, Emilio was the youngest of his family and didn't get to inherit any of his family's grand titles hence why the queen regent created the peerage for him.

DeathEdit

Emilio Drake was last elected deputy in 1907 and left his seat in the Chamber of Deputies in 1908.[10] He retired to his estate in La Cervanta, Toledo, the following year. He died in July 1915. His son, Francisco, became the 2nd Marquess of Cañada Honda.[11]

StylesEdit

27 January 1855 - 12 April 1891: The Most Illustrious, Don Emilio Drake y De La Cerda

12 April 1891 - 20 March 1893: The Most Illustrious, Don Emilio Drake y De La Cerda, Senator for Puerto Rico

20 March 1893 - 2 July 1915: The Most Excellent The Marquess of Cañada Honda, Knight Grand Cross of the Order of Isabella the Catholic, Maestrante of La Real de Sevilla

1898-1908: The Most Excellent The Marquess of Cañada Honda, Knight Grand Cross of the Order of Isabella the Catholic, Maestrante of La Real de Sevilla, Deputy to the Cortes Generales.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ España, Senado de. "???DetalleFichaSenadorHistorico???". www.senado.es (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  2. ^ España, Senado de. "???DetalleFichaSenadorHistorico???". www.senado.es (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  3. ^ "Emilio Drake del Castillo y de la Cerda, I Marqués de Cañada Honda". geni_family_tree. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  4. ^ Garzón, Juan Sisinio Pérez (2004). Isabel II: los espejos de la reina (in Spanish). Marcial Pons Historia. ISBN 9788495379764.
  5. ^ "María Virginia de la Cerda y Gand-Vilain, VII Marquesa de Eguaras". geni_family_tree. Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  6. ^ Garzón, Juan Sisinio Pérez (2004). Isabel II: los espejos de la reina (in Spanish). Marcial Pons Historia. ISBN 9788495379764.
  7. ^ "Genealogía de María de la Asunción Fernández-Durán Bernaldo de Quirós". Geneanet (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017-12-15.
  8. ^ "Índice Histórico de Diputados - Congreso de los Diputados".
  9. ^ Amo, Esther Calzada del (2011). Germán Gamazo, 1840-1901: poder político y redes sociales en la Restauración (in Spanish). Marcial Pons Historia. ISBN 9788492820382.
  10. ^ "Índice Histórico de Diputados - Congreso de los Diputados". Congreso de los Diputados.
  11. ^ "Índice Histórico de Diputados - Congreso de los Diputados". Congreso de los Diputados.