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Donors Capital Fund (DCF) is a nonprofit United States donor-advised charity that distributes grants to conservative and libertarian organizations. Donors Capital Fund is associated with Donors Trust, another donor-advised fund.

Donors Capital Fund
Type Nonprofit 501(c)(3)
54-1934032
Location
Coordinates 38°48′20″N 77°03′37″W / 38.8056°N 77.0603°W / 38.8056; -77.0603Coordinates: 38°48′20″N 77°03′37″W / 38.8056°N 77.0603°W / 38.8056; -77.0603
Services Donor-advised fund
Revenue (2014)
US$49,063,464[1]
Expenses (2014) US$49,229,176[1]
Website www.donorscapitalfund.org

Contents

BackgroundEdit

Donors Capital Fund was established in 1999.[2] It is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.[1] According to the organization, it was "formed to safeguard the charitable intent of donors who are dedicated to the ideals of limited government, personal responsibility, and free enterprise."[3] Donors Capital Fund assures contributors that their donations will only support "a class of public charities firmly committed to liberty."[4] Grants from Donors Capital Fund are based on the preferences of the original contributor.[5]

Donors Capital Fund is associated with Donors Trust. Donors Trust refers clients to Donors Capital Fund if the client plans to maintain a balance of US$1 million or more.[3][6]

As of 2016, the board of directors of Donors Capital Fund includes Lawson Bader, Adam Meyerson of Philanthropy Roundtable, Arthur C. Brooks of the American Enterprise Institute, Kimberly Dennis of the Searle Freedom Trust, Steven F. Hayward of the Ashbrook Center for Public Affairs, Kris Mauren of the Acton Institute, Scott Bullock of the Institute for Justice, and Roger Ream of The Fund for American Studies.[7]

Grant-making activitiesEdit

According to the The Guardian, Donors Trust and Donors Capital Fund distributed nearly US$120 million to more than 100 groups skeptical of global warming between 2002 and 2010.[8] According to a 2013 analysis by Drexel University environmental sociologist Robert Brulle, Donors Trust and Donors Capital Fund combined were the largest funders of what he calls "the climate change countermovement" in the US between 2003 and 2013.[5][9] Brulle estimated that by 2009, approximately one-quarter of the funding of the "climate countermovement" came from Donors Trust and Donors Capital Fund.[6]

In 2008, Donors Capital Fund granted US$17.7 million to the Clarion Fund, now the Clarion Project, a nonprofit organization which educates the U.S. public about the dangers of Islamic extremism.[10][11]

Donors Capital Fund granted US$192,000 to the Alaska Policy Forum (APF) in the organization's first two years, 2009 and 2010. APF is free-market think tank and a member of the State Policy Network (SPN) of conservative and libertarian think tanks which focus on state-level policy. The grants from Donors Capital Fund were most of the funds raised by APF in that period.[12] In 2010, Donors Capital Fund granted US$1.75 million to SPN, US$2 million to Donors Trust, US$2.5 million to the American Enterprise Institute, US$2 million to Citizens Against Government Waste, US$1.7 million to The Heartland Institute, and over 206 other grantees.[13]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "IRS Form 990 2014" (PDF). GuideStar. Internal Revenue Service. Retrieved 29 March 2016. 
  2. ^ "Bruce H. Jacobs". Donors Capital Fund. Retrieved February 22, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b "What is Donors Capital Fund?". Donors Capital Fund. Retrieved February 21, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Mission and Principles". Donors Capital Fund. Retrieved June 19, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b Brulle, Robert J. (December 21, 2013). "Institutionalizing delay: foundation funding and the creation of U.S. climate change counter-movement organizations". Climatic Change. 122 (4): 681–94. doi:10.1007/s10584-013-1018-7. 
  6. ^ a b "Robert Brulle: Inside the Climate Change "Countermovement"". Frontline. PBS. October 23, 2012. Retrieved February 21, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Donors Capital Fund Board of Directors". Donors Capital Fund. Retrieved June 1, 2016. 
  8. ^ Goldenberg, Suzanne (February 14, 2013). "Secret funding helped build vast network of climate denial thinktanks". The Guardian. Retrieved February 7, 2015. 
  9. ^ Kroll, Andy (February 5, 2013). "Exposed: The Dark-Money ATM of the Conservative Movement". Mother Jones. 
  10. ^ Elliott, Justin (November 16, 2010). "Mystery of who funded right-wing "radical Islam" campaign deepens". Salon. Retrieved February 21, 2015. 
  11. ^ Zornick, George (August 29, 2011). "Fear, Inc.: America's Islamophobia Network". The Nation. Retrieved February 20, 2015. 
  12. ^ DeMarban, Alex (September 14, 2014). "Conservative group shapes Alaska policy debate with Outside help". Alaska Dispatch News. Retrieved February 21, 2015. 
  13. ^ Hickley, Walter (February 12, 2013). "Inside The Secretive Dark-Money Organization That's Keeping The Lights On For Conservative Groups". Business Insider. Retrieved February 21, 2013. 

External linksEdit