Dominik Paris (born 14 April 1989) is an Italian World Cup alpine ski racer, who specializes in speed events. He is the current world champion of the super-G in 2019 Åre.

Dominik Paris
Alpine skier
Dominik Paris (Milan 2014).JPG
October 2014
DisciplinesDownhill, Super-G,
Combined
ClubG.S. Forestale
Born (1989-04-14) 14 April 1989 (age 30)
Merano, Trentino-South Tyrol, Italy
Height1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
World Cup debut19 December 2008
(age 19)
Websitedominikparis.com
Olympics
Teams3 – (2010, 2014, 2018)
Medals0
World Championships
Teams5 – (20112019)
Medals2 (1 gold)
World Cup
Seasons12 – (20092020)
Wins18 – (14 DH, 4 SG)
Podiums37 – (23 DH, 13 SG, 1 SC)
Overall titles0 – (4th in 2019)
Discipline titles1 – (SG, 2019)

Racing careerEdit

Paris made his World Cup debut in December 2008 and won his first World Cup race in late December 2012 in Italy, a dead-heat tie with Hannes Reichelt in the downhill on the Pista Stelvio at Bormio. Aksel Lund Svindal was just one hundredth of a second behind for third and Klaus Kröll was fourth, just one hundredth behind Svindal. It was the closest top-four finish in World Cup downhill history (0.02 of a second) and the first tie in a men's downhill in nearly 35 years (January 1978).[1][2] Four weeks later, Paris firmly established himself as a top downhill racer on the circuit with a win at Kitzbühel on the classic Streif course.[3][4]

At the 2013 World Championships in Austria, Paris won the silver medal in the downhill, 0.46 seconds behind gold medalist Aksel Lund Svindal.[5][6]

Paris gained his first victory in Super-G at Kitzbühel in 2015, and placed second in the downhill the next day. Two years later in 2017, he won his second downhill on the Streif course and in 2019 he concluded a "Hahnenkamm hat trick" with his third downhill win at Kitzbühel. This third victory ties him with Pirmin Zurbriggen, Luc Alphand and Franz Heinzer as the third most successful downhill racer at Kitzbühel; only Franz Klammer, Karl Schranz, (4x) and Didier Cuche (5x) won more often - but only few of them on the entire length of the original 'Streif' run. SOURCE

In the 2018–19 season, after a double victory in Bormio and in Kvitfjell, Paris added a double victory at the World Cup Finals in Soldeu, where he won the first crystal globe in career in the super-G. Previously in the season, he won the gold medal in the same event at the World Championships in Åre, Sweden.

Paris started the 2019–2020 season with runner-up finishes in the first two speed events at Lake Louise, Canada. On December 27–28, 2019, he won consecutive World Cup downhills in Bormio, becoming the first skier in history to achieve five downhill victories – four in a row – on the Stelvio course. In late January, three days after his first-ever podium on the classic Lauberhorn downhill, Paris suffered an ACL injury during a training session, ending prematurely his season.[7]

Through 28 December 2019, he has eighteen World Cup wins and thirty-six podiums.

World Cup resultsEdit

Season titlesEdit

Season Discipline
2019 Super-G

Season standingsEdit

Season Age Overall Slalom Giant
Slalom
Super G Downhill Combined
2010 20 72 37 43 21
2011 21 47 55 21 20
2012 22 31 52 14 18
2013 23 14 23 3 11
2014 24 35 32 15 22
2015 25 7 2 5 36
2016 26 6 10 3 4
2017 27 8 56 4 3 39
2018 28 12 16 4 11
2019 29 4 1 2
2020 30   4 ^ 5 2 18
Standings through 18 January 2020
^ Season-ending injury in late January 2020

Race podiumsEdit

  • 18 wins – (14 DH, 4 SG)
  • 37 podiums – (23 DH, 13 SG, 1 SC)
Season Date Location Discipline Place
2011 29 January 2011   Chamonix, France Downhill 2nd
2013 29 December 2012   Bormio, Italy Downhill 1st
26 January 2013   Kitzbühel, Austria Downhill 1st
2014 30 November 2013   Lake Louise, Canada Downhill 1st
2015 30 November 2014 Super-G 3rd
19 December 2014   Val Gardena, Italy Downhill 3rd
20 December 2014 Super-G 2nd
28 December 2014   Santa Caterina, Italy Downhill 3rd
23 January 2015   Kitzbühel, Austria Super-G 1st
24 January 2015 Downhill 2nd
2016 6 February 2016   Jeongseon, South Korea Downhill 2nd
19 February 2016   Chamonix, France Super combined 2nd
20 February 2016 Downhill 1st
12 March 2016  Kvitfjell, Norway Downhill 1st
13 March 2016 Super-G 3rd
2017 2 December 2016   Val-d'Isère, France Super-G 3rd
27 December 2016   Santa Caterina, Italy Super-G 3rd
21 January 2017   Kitzbühel, Austria Downhill 1st
15 March 2017   Aspen, USA Downhill 1st
16 March 2017 Super-G 2nd
2018 28 December 2017   Bormio, Italy Downhill 1st
27 January 2018   Garmisch, Germany Downhill 2nd
2019 24 November 2018   Lake Louise, Canada Downhill 3rd
1 December 2018   Beaver Creek, USA Super-G 3rd
28 December 2018   Bormio, Italy Downhill 1st
29 December 2018 Super-G 1st
25 January 2019   Kitzbühel, Austria Downhill 1st
27 January 2019 Super-G 3rd
2 March 2019    Kvitfjell, Norway Downhill 1st
3 March 2019 Super-G 1st
13 March 2019   Soldeu, Andorra Downhill 1st
14 March 2019 Super-G 1st
2020 30 November 2019   Lake Louise, Canada Downhill 2nd
1 December 2019 Super-G 2nd
27 December 2019   Bormio, Italy Downhill 1st
28 December 2019 Downhill 1st
18 January 2020     Wengen, Switzerland Downhill 2nd

World Championships resultsEdit

  Year    Age   Slalom   Giant 
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
2011 21 20 DNF2
2013 23 2 9
2015 25 14 23 10
2017 27 9 13 4
2019 29 1 6 9

Olympic resultsEdit

  Year    Age   Slalom   Giant 
 slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
2010 20 13
2014 24 16 11 18
2018 28 7 4 DNF2

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Top four within .02 of second in Bormio downhill". Ski Racing.com. 29 December 2012.
  2. ^ Jelusic, Ana (29 December 2012). "Paris, Reichelt and Svindal within 0.01 second in Bormio!". FIS Alpine.com.
  3. ^ "Dom Paris wins Hahnenkamm DH for Italy". Ski Racing.com. 26 January 2013.
  4. ^ Jelusic, Ana (26 January 2013). "Dominik Paris tames the Streif". FIS Alpine.com.
  5. ^ "Svindal spectacular in winning World DH title". Ski Racing.com. 9 February 2013.
  6. ^ "Downhill Gold for Aksel Lund Svindal". FIS Alpine.com. 9 February 2013.
  7. ^ "Game over for Paris following ACL injury". FIS-Ski.com. 21 January 2020.

External linksEdit