Diocese of Accia

The Diocese of Accia was a Roman Catholic bishopric on the island of Corsica. It is now a titular diocese. The diocese was located in the town of Accia in the interior region of Haute-Corse, which was destroyed and from which only some ruins remain. Established in 824 AD it was merged with the Diocese of Mariana in 1554. In 1570 the Bishop of Mariana and Accia moved his seat to Bastia.[1]

Location of Accia in Corsica

In 1968, the Diocese of Accia was revived as a titular See, and with one brief exception, has been used as a title for Auxiliary Bishops of various dioceses.[2]

BishopsEdit

Bishops of AcciaEdit

  • Nicolaus (909)[3]
  • Riccobonus (930)
  • Henricus (Enrico o Arrigo) (1133)
  • Opizo (1237)
  • Imerius Guardalupo, O.E.S.A. (ca. 1267 - 1272)[4]
  • Benvenuto Nonno, O.Cist. (ca. 1297 - 1332)[5]
  • Angelo, O.Min. (20 Sep 1332 - 1344)
  • Nicolaus (28 May 1344 - 1348)[6]
  • Francesco de Quesso, O.Min. (11 Feb 1348 - ? )[7]
  • Raimondo de Piacenza, O.Min. (13 May 1377 - ? )
  • Francesco Bonaccorsi, O.Min. (13 Oct 1400 - 1421?)[8]
  • Ludovico di Narni, O.F.M. (26 March 1401 - ? )
  • Agnello di Napoli, O.Carm. (30 May 1421 - 1440? )[9]
  • Alberto de Casini, O.F.M. (6 Feb 1441 - 8 Sept 1450)[10]
  • Antonio d'Omessa, O.P. (17 March 1451 - ? )[11]
  • Giovanni Andrea Bussi (3 March 1463 - 23 July 1466)[12]
  • Antonio de Bonaumbra (4 May 1467 - ? )
  • Bartolomeo Panmoglio (Pammoleo) (14 April 1480 - ? )[13]
  • Girolamo Antonio di Subiaco (21 Feb 1494 - ? )
  • Domenico de Valletari (21 Aug 1500 - 1521)
  • Bernardino de Luca (16 Oct 1521 - ? )[14]
  • Benedetto de Nobili (1536 - 1545)
  • Girolamo Boccadoro (26 Aug 1545 - ? )
  • Pietro Affatato (14 Feb 1547 - 3 July 1553)[15]
  • Agostino Salvago, O.P. (18 Aug 1553 - 28 Nov 1558)[16]
  • Giulio Superchio, O.Carm. † (14 Feb 1560 - 30 January 1563)[17]

Diocese of Mariana and AcciaEdit

  • Nicolo Cicala (1563 – 1570)[18]
  • Giovanni Battista Centurioni (4 September 1570 – 1584)[19]
  • Nicolaus Mascardi (9 April 1584 – 1599)[20]
  • Hieronymus de Puteo (dal Pozzo) (29 November 1599 – 11 July 1622)[21]
  • Iulius de Puteo (dal Pozzo)
  • Giovanni Agostino Marliani
  • Carlo Fabrizio Giustiniani (10 January 1656 – 1 September 1682)[22]
  • Agostino Fieschi, O.Theat. (14 June 1683 – 28 May 1685)[23]
  • Giovanni Carlo de Mari
  • Mario Emmanuele Durazzo (1704 – 1707)[24]
  • Andrea dalla Rocca (28 November 1707 – March 1720)[25]
  • Andrea Saluzzo (3 July 1720 – 1747)[26]
  • Domenico Saporiti (31 July 1747 – April 1772)[27]
  • Angelo Edoardo Stefanini (7 September 1772 – 29 January 1775)[28]
  • Francesco Citadella (29 May 1775 – 1781[29]
  • Pierre Pineau Duverdier, Orat. (25 February 1782 – December 1788)[30]
  • Ignace François Verclos (30 March 1789 – May 1801)[31]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dana Facaros; Michael Pauls (2008). Corsica. London: New Holland Publishers. p. 223. ISBN 978-1-86011-390-1. Gauchat, IV, p. 232 note 1.
  2. ^ David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: Accia (Titular See), retrieved: 2016-11-21[self-published source]
  3. ^ Gams,. p. 765.
  4. ^ Bishop Imerio was not a Franciscan, as Ughelli states. He had served as Legate of Pope Gregory X to various states, including Venice and Genoa. In 1274 he participated in the Second Council of Lyons. Ughelli, p. 907-908 (Coleti's note). Cappelletti, p. 357.Eubel, I, p. 67.
  5. ^ Ughelli, p. 908. Cappelletti, p. 358.
  6. ^ Nicolaus had been titular Bishop of Cithonia in Greece. Eubel, I, p. 188.
  7. ^ Gams, p. 766.
  8. ^ Buonaccorsi had been Bishop of Gravina in the Kingdom of Naples (1 May 1395–13 October 1400), and was Nuncio and Inquisitor in Corsica. Cappelletti, p. 359. Eubel, I, p. 268.
  9. ^ Agnello di Napoli was appointed by Pope Martin V. Eubel, I, p. 67.
  10. ^ Eubel, II, p. 68.
  11. ^ Antonius d'Omessa failed to pay the obligations undertaken by Agnello and Alberto, as well as by himself; he was excommunicated and deposed. Eubel, II, p. 78, note 2.
  12. ^ Bussi was a native of Vigevano in the Piedmont. He had important protectors: Cardinal Nicholas of Cusa, whose private secretary he had been, and Cardinal Juan Carvajal. In 1466 Bussi was transferred to the diocese of Aleria. He never visited either Accia or Aleria. Instead, in 1472 he became the Vatican Librarian and held the post until his death in 1475. Egmont Lee (1978). Sixtus IV and Men of Letters. Roma: Ed. di Storia e Letteratura. pp. 105–110. GGKEY:CWS8W392RYB.
  13. ^ Pammoleo was Provost of S. Pietro in Banchi in Genoa in 1475. Antoine Franzini (2005). La Corse du XVe siècle: Politique et société 1433-1483 (in Italian). Ajaccio: Editions Alain Piazzola. p. 547. ISBN 978-2-915410-22-8.
  14. ^ Eubel, III, p. 92.
  15. ^ Affatato was appointed bishop of Minori (1553-1557). Eubel, III, p. 246.
  16. ^ Salvagio resigned. He was appointed Archbishop of Genoa on 17 August 1559. Eubel, III, pp. 94 with note 8; 215 with n. 5.
  17. ^ Superchio was appointed Bishop of Caorle (Caprulensis), on the beach between Venice and Grado (1563-1585). Eubel, III, p. 151.
  18. ^ Niccolò was a brother of Cardinal Giovanni Battista Cicala. Niccolò, who had been Bishop of Mariana since 1560, was appointed Bishop of Accia and Mariana in 1563.
  19. ^ Gams, p. 766.
  20. ^ Mascardi: Eubel, III, p. 235.
  21. ^ Del Pozzo: Gauchat, IV, p. 232.
  22. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 256, note 2.
  23. ^ Fieschi was born in Genoa. He had been Provost of the convent of S. Antonio in Rimini. He was consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Alessandro Crescenzio on 20 June 1683. Ritzler, V, p. 256 with note 3.
  24. ^ Durazzo: Gams, p. 767. Ritzler, V, p. 256 with note 5.
  25. ^ Della Rocca: Ritzler, V, p. 256 with note 6.
  26. ^ Saluzzo was born in the village of Albaro in the diocese of Genoa. He was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the University of Rome, La Sapienza (1715). He had been Bishop of Aleria from 18 March 1715 to 3 July 1720. Ritzler, V, p. 76 with note 6; p. 256 with note 7.
  27. ^ Saporiti was born in Genoa and was Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the University of Pisa (1738). He was consecrated in Rome on 15 August 1747 by Cardinal Antonio Severio Gentili. Gams, p. 767. Ritzler, VI, p. 276 with note 2.
  28. ^ Stefanini was born in Bastia, Corsica. He was a Doctor of theology of the University of Genoa (1733) and Doctor in utroque iure (Civil and Canon Law) from the University of Macerata (1741). He had been Archdeacon of Mariana, and then Vicar-General of Mariana. He was named Bishop of Sagone in Corsica (1770–1772), and consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Henry Stuart on 12 August 1770. He was nominated Bishop of Mariana and Accia by King Louis XV on 7 June 1772 and approved by Pope Clement XIV on 7 September 1772. Gams, p. 767. Ritzler, VI, p. 276 with note 3; p. 362 with note 4.
  29. ^ Citadella was nominated by King Louis XVI on 26 February 1775, and approved by Pope Pius VI on 29 May 1775. Ritzler, VI, p. 276 with note 4.
  30. ^ Duverdier (or Du Verdier) was born in the diocese of Agen in Aquitaine. He held a licenciate in Canon Law, and had been Vicar-General of the diocese of Tours. Ritzler, VI, p. 276 with note 5.
  31. ^ Verclos was born in Avignon in the Papal States. He was a Doctor of theology (Paris). He had been Vicar-General of the diocese of Narbonne. He was nominated bishop of Mariana by King Louis XVI on 7 December 1788, and approved by Pope Pius VI on 30 March 1789. On the election of a 'Constitutional Bishop of Corse', he made a protest and fled to Italy, returning only when the English had seized the island. He died in Perugia in May 1801. Armand Jean (1891). Les évêques et les archevêques de France depuis 1682 jusqu'à 1801 (in French). Paris: A. Picard. p. 496. Ritzler, VI, p. 276 with note 6.

BooksEdit