Derek Fordjour

Derek Fordjour (born 1974 in Memphis, Tennessee) is an American interdisciplinary artist of Ghanaian heritage,[1] who works in video/film, sculpture and painting. Fordjour received an MFA from Hunter College,[2] an Ed. M in Arts Education from Harvard University,[3] and a B.A. degree from Morehouse College. Fordjour lives and works in New York City.

Derek Fordjour
Derek Fordjour.jpg
EducationHarvard University, Hunter College

His work has been exhibited in numerous venues including Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis,[4] Nasher Museum of Art[5] and the Whitney Museum of Contemporary Art.[6] He has received commissions for public projects including a permanent installation for Metropolitan Transit Authority of New York City at 145th Street Subway Station[7] and The Whitney Museum Billboard Project.[8] He was awarded 2016 Sugarhill Museum Artist-in-Residence,[9] the 2017 Sharpe Walentas Studio Program[10] in New York City, and named the 2018 Deutsche Bank NYFA Fellowship Award.[11] In 2021, the artist had a solo exhibition at Pond Society in Shanghai. His paintings there looked at the gamification of social structures and vulnerability. In these recent paintings, Fordjour incorporated layers of the Financial Times. On his use of the paper in his practice, Fordjour explained in Ocula Magazine: 'The Financial Times is making an effort to differentiate itself from the pool of other newsprint with its distinctive colour. The idea of individuation—the desire to distinguish oneself in the face of being stereotyped or grouped—has a tension that I identify with.'[12]

He was recently appointed The Alex Katz Chair at Cooper Union and serves as a Core Critic at Yale University School of Art.[13] His work also appears in several public and private collections throughout the United States and abroad, including The Studio Museum of Harlem,[14] Brooklyn Museum,[15] Perez Museum,[16] Dallas Museum of Art,[17] The Whitney Museum[18] and LACMA.

Fordjour is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity. He was commissioned by Alpha Phi Alpha to create a portrait entitled An Experiment in Brotherhood to commemorate the founding of the fraternity.[19]

Select exhibitionsEdit

  • 2020 'SELF MUST DIE', Petzel Gallery, New York, NY[20]
  • 2020 'SHELTER', Contemporary Art Museum of St. Louis, St. Louis, MO[21]
  • 2019 'The House Always Wins', Josh Lilley, London, UK[22]
  • 2019 'JRRNNYS', Night Gallery, Los Angeles, CA[23]
  • 2018 'Half Mast', The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY[24]
  • 2018 'Derek Fordjour: Camelot Study', BAM, Brooklyn, NY[25]
  • 2018 'Ritual', Nina Johnson Gallery, Miami, FL[26]
  • 2017 'PARADE', Sugar Hill Museum, New York, NY[27]
  • 2016 'Agency and Regulation', LUCE Gallery, Turin, Italy[28]
  • 2016 'Eight Paintings', Papillion Art, Los Angeles, CA[29]
  • 2015 'UPPER ROOM', Robert Blumenthal Gallery, New York, NY[30]

Selected press and reviewsEdit

  • Hyperallergic, "Derek Fordjour Conjures a Heavenly World", Seph Rodney, December 16, 2020[31]
  • T: The New York Times Style Magazine, “Marching to…, T Magazine, November 27, 2020[32]
  • New York Times, “Derek Fordjour, From Anguish…”, Siddhartha Mitter, November 19, 2020[33]
  • ARTNews, “Best Practices: Derek Fordjour…”, Andy Battaglia, November 10, 2020[34]
  • Financial Times, “Derek Fordjour on painting…”, Jackie Wullschläger, October 20, 2020[35]
  • Elephant Magazine, “Derek Fordjour Uses Sport…”, Emily Steer, October 16, 2020[36]
  • Artsy, “Derek Fordjour Honors Disenfranchised…”, Jacqui Germain, June 3, 2020[37]
  • Financial Times, “Painting crowds, or the lack…”, Jackie Wullschläger, May 8, 2020[38]
  • Hyperallergic, “Derek Fordjour Considers…”, Jack Radley, April 6, 2020[39]
  • Artforum, “Critics Pick: Derek Fordjour: Shelter”, Jennifer Piejko, January 2020[40]
  • St. Louis Post Dispatch, “Beyond white walls…”, Jane Henderson, January 17, 2020[41]
  • Financial Times, “Four exhibitions bring African…”, Jackie Wullschlager, 2019[42]
  • Artnews, “Petzel Gallery Now Represents Derek…”, Annie Armstrong, 2019[43]
  • Galerie, “The rising-star artist uses imagery of carnivals…”, Lucy Rees, 2019[44]
  • Cultured, “Artist Derek Fordjour Revels in The Game…”, Jennifer Piejko, 2019[45]
  • Los Angeles Times, “Datebook: Paintings of…”, Carolina A. Miranda, 2019[46]
  • The Wall Street Journal, “‘I Don’t Want to Be a Blip…”, Kelly Crow, 2019[47]
  • Artnet News, “8 Art Advisors Tell Us Which Artists…”, Henri Neuendorf, 2018[48]
  • Culture Type, “Historic Bequest: Late Arts…”, Victoria L. Valentine, Oct, 10 2018[49]
  • Artnet News, “Price Check! Here’s What Sold…”, artnet News, October 9, 2018[50]
  • Hyperallergic, “Studio Museum in Harlem…”, Jasmine Weber, October 8, 2018[51]
  • Artnews, “Even as Brexit Looms, Galleries…”, Judd Tully, October 3, 2018[52]
  • Gotham, “6 Innovators Shaping…”, The Editors, October 1, 2018[53]
  • Juvenile Justice, “Arts-centered New York…”, Shay Urbani, May 25, 2018[54]
  • Hyperallergic, “Wandering the Artists…”, Seph Rodney, May 5, 2018[55]
  • Surface, “Best of Zona Maco 2018”, Brooke Porter Katz, February 11, 2018[56]
  • Artsy, “What Sold at Zona Maco”, Anna Louie Sussman, February 11, 2018[57]
  • Hyperallergic, “The Political Truths…”, Seph Rodney, February 9, 2018[58]
  • The Art Newspaper, “Art Los…”, Maxwell Williams, January 31, 2018[59]
  • Artnet News, “How Artist Derek Fordjour…”, Sarah Cascone, December 18, 2017[60]
  • Hyperallergic, “A Dreamy Carnival…”, Seph Rodney, November 22, 2017[61]
  • The Undefeated, “The Portrait of an Artist…”, Kelley D. Evans, October 6, 2017[62]
  • Galerie Magazine, “Derek Fordjour’s Immersive…”, Jacqueline Terrebonne, August 2, 2017[63]
  • Forbes, “The Jay-Z of the Art World Discusses His…”, Brienne Walsh, July 16, 2017[64]
  • Vice, “Sports Are a Metaphor for Inequality…”, Francesca Capossela, June 21, 2017[65]
  • Los Angeles Times, "And There is an End...", David Pagel, March 21, 2016[66]
  • Los Angeles Times, “Derek Fordjour: Eight Paintings..” by Carolina Miranda, February 4, 2016[67]
  • Observer, "Nine Overachieving New Yorkers You Must Date", February 3, 2016[68]
  • New York Times, “From Derek Fordjour...” by Holland Cotter, November 19, 2015[69]
  • Los Angeles Times, “And There is an End..” by David Pagel, March 21, 2015[70]
  • The Brooklyn Rail, Review of ‘The Big Game’.. by Johnathan Goodman, October 7, 2014[71]
  • Ebony, “Artist Derek Fordjour has a Lesson for…”, by Souleo, September 29, 2014[72]
  • Huffington Post, “The Sports World Could Learn...” by Souleo, 2014[73]
  • MSNBC’s Thegrio.com, “40 Amazing Black Artists to Watch in 2014”, January 3, 2014[74]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Derek Fordjour - Artists - Petzel Gallery". www.petzel.com. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  2. ^ "Hunter College MFA Spring 2016 Thesis Exhibitions — Hunter College". www.hunter.cuny.edu. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  3. ^ "Black Sorority Project". thinktalk.com. Retrieved 6 October 2010.
  4. ^ "Derek Fordjour: SHELTER". Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  5. ^ "Signing Day". Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  6. ^ "Derek Fordjour: Half Mast". whitney.org. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  7. ^ "MTA - Arts & Design | NYCT Permanent Art". web.mta.info. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  8. ^ "Derek Fordjour: Half Mast". whitney.org. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  9. ^ "AIR Derek Fordjour". Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  10. ^ thestudioprogram.com https://thestudioprogram.com/artist/derek-fordjour/. Retrieved 2021-03-12. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ "Derek Fordjour 2018 Deutsche Bank NYFA Fellow". www.db.com. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  12. ^ "Derek Fordjour's Vibrant Interactions". ocula.com. 2021-06-25. Retrieved 2021-06-25.
  13. ^ "Derek Fordjour". Yale School of Art. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  14. ^ "Peggy Cooper Cafritz Bequeaths Over 400 Works to the Studio Museum". The Studio Museum in Harlem. 2018-10-10. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  15. ^ "Brooklyn Museum". www.brooklynmuseum.org. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  16. ^ "Pérez Art Museum Miami Announces New Acquisitions from Eleven Artists for Permanent Collection". www.pamm.org. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  17. ^ "Dallas Museum of Art Debuts New Acquisitions in New Exhibition "Contemporary Art + Design" | Dallas Museum of Art". dma.org. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  18. ^ "Derek Fordjour | Half Mast". whitney.org. Retrieved 2021-03-12.
  19. ^ "The Jewels of Alpha Phi Alpha". Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Gamma Phi chapter. Retrieved 6 October 2010.[permanent dead link]
  20. ^ "Derek Fordjour - SELF MUST DIE - Exhibitions - Petzel Gallery". www.petzel.com. Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  21. ^ "Derek Fordjour: SHELTER". Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  22. ^ Rogers, Simon. "josh-lilley". josh-lilley. Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  23. ^ "Derek Fordjour - JRRNNYS - Exhibitions - Night Gallery". www.nightgallery.ca. Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  24. ^ "Derek Fordjour: Half Mast". whitney.org. Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  25. ^ "Derek Fordjour: Camelot Study". BAM.org. Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  26. ^ "Ritual". Nina Johnson. 2018-02-23. Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  27. ^ "Art Parade Derek Forjour". Sugar Hill Children's Museum of Art & Storytelling. Retrieved 2021-03-09.
  28. ^ Design, DSI. "Luce Gallery". lucegallery.com. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  29. ^ "Eight Paintings - PAPILLION". www.papillionart.com. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  30. ^ "UPPER ROOM - Derek Fordjour - Exhibitions - Robert Blumenthal Gallery". www.robertblumenthal.com. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  31. ^ Rodney, Seph (2020-12-16). "Derek Fordjour Conjures a Heavenly World". Hyperallergic. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  32. ^ "Marching to the Beat of Their Own Drum". The New York Times. 2020-11-27. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  33. ^ Mitter, Siddhartha (2020-11-19). "Derek Fordjour, From Anguish to Transcendence". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  34. ^ Battaglia, Andy (2020-11-10). "Best Practices: Derek Fordjour's Art Stares Down Shared Fears and Vulnerabilities". ARTnews.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  35. ^ "Subscribe to read | Financial Times". www.ft.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14. {{cite web}}: Cite uses generic title (help)
  36. ^ Steer, Emily (2020-10-16). "Derek Fordjour Uses Sport as the Perfect Allegory for Organised Society". ELEPHANT. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  37. ^ Germain, Jacqui (2020-06-03). "Derek Fordjour Honors Disenfranchised Communities in His Vibrant, Layered Work". Artsy. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  38. ^ "Subscribe to read | Financial Times". www.ft.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14. {{cite web}}: Cite uses generic title (help)
  39. ^ Radley, Jack (2020-04-06). "Derek Fordjour Considers the Precariousness of Shelter". Hyperallergic. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  40. ^ ""Derek Fordjour: Shelter" at Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis". www.artforum.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  41. ^ Henderson, Jane. "Beyond white walls: CAM exhibition examines 'what we all seek'". STLtoday.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  42. ^ Wullschläger, Jackie (2019-09-26). "Four exhibitions bring African American narratives to London". www.ft.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  43. ^ Armstrong, Annie (2019-04-29). "Petzel Gallery Now Represents Derek Fordjour". ARTnews.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  44. ^ "Derek Fordjour". Galerie. 2019-03-05. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  45. ^ "Artist Derek Fordjour Revels in the Game Toppling Expectations As He Goes". Cultured Magazine. 2019-02-15. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  46. ^ "Datebook: Paintings of sport and art inspired by convenience stores and confession". Los Angeles Times. 2019-01-31. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  47. ^ Crow, Kelly (2019-01-30). "'I Don't Want to Be a Blip': An Artist on the Rise Adjusts to the Spotlight". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  48. ^ "8 Art Advisors Tell Us Which Artists You Should Be Watching (and Buying) in 2019". Artnet News. 2018-12-20. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  49. ^ "Historic Bequest: Late Arts Patron Peggy Cooper Cafritz Gifted 650+ Works of Art to the Studio Museum in Harlem and Duke Ellington School of the Arts". Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  50. ^ "Price Check! Here's What Sold—and for How Much—at Frieze London and Frieze Masters 2018". Artnet News. 2018-10-09. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  51. ^ Weber, Jasmine (2018-10-09). "Studio Museum in Harlem and DC Arts High School Receive Historic Gift of Over 650 Contemporary Works". Hyperallergic. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  52. ^ Tully, Judd (2018-10-03). "Even as Brexit Looms, Galleries Notch Sales on Frieze London's Opening Day". ARTnews.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  53. ^ "6 Innovators Shaping The Culture of NYC". gothammag.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  54. ^ Urbani, Shay (2018-05-25). "Arts-centered New York Diversion Program for Youth Displays High Success Rate". Juvenile Justice Information Exchange. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  55. ^ Rodney, Seph (2018-05-05). "Wandering the Artist Studios of Dumbo". Hyperallergic. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  56. ^ "Best of Zona Maco 2018". SURFACE. 2018-02-11. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  57. ^ Sussman, Anna Louie (2018-02-11). "What Sold at Zona Maco". Artsy. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  58. ^ Rodney, Seph (2018-02-09). "The Political Truths That Ground Our Athletic Heroes". Hyperallergic. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  59. ^ "Art Los Angeles Contemporary fair perks up, but is it enough?". www.theartnewspaper.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  60. ^ "How Artist Derek Fordjour Turned Cardboard and Newspaper Into a Carnival Funhouse". Artnet News. 2017-12-18. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  61. ^ Rodney, Seph (2017-11-22). "A Dreamy Carnival at the Children's Museum in Harlem". Hyperallergic. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  62. ^ Evans, Kelley D. (2017-10-06). "The portrait of an artist: Derek Fordjour dissects race, sports and culture". The Undefeated. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  63. ^ "Artist Derek Fordjour's Immersive Wonderland Dedicated to Children". Galerie. 2017-08-02. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  64. ^ Walsh, Brienne. "The Jay-Z Of The Art World Discusses His Upcoming Show In Harlem". Forbes. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  65. ^ "Sports Are a Metaphor for Inequality in These Colorful Paintings". www.vice.com. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  66. ^ "Review: 'And There Is an End' -- but no end to its goofy appeal". Los Angeles Times. 2015-03-21. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  67. ^ Miranda, Carolina A. (15 January 2016). "Datebook: Ceramic installations, Korean and American minimalism, punk-inspired pieces". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  68. ^ "Nine Overachieving New Yorkers You Must Date". Observer. 2016-02-03. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  69. ^ Cotter, Holland (2015-11-19). "From Derek Fordjour, a Sense of Abandoned Ritual". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  70. ^ Pagel, David (21 March 2015). "'And There Is an End' -- but no end to its goofy appeal". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  71. ^ "DEREK FORDJOUR The Big Game". www.brooklynrail.org. 3 October 2014. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  72. ^ Souleo (2016-07-22). "Artist Derek Fordjour Has a Lesson for the Sports World • EBONY". EBONY. Retrieved 2021-03-14.
  73. ^ Journalist, Peter 'Souleo' Wright; curator (2014-09-24). "On the "A" w/Souleo: The Sports World Could Learn From Derek Fordjour's Artworks". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 2016-12-12.
  74. ^ "40 amazing black artists to watch in 2014". TheGrio. 2014-01-03. Retrieved 2021-03-14.

External linksEdit