David Andrews (politician)

David Andrews (born 15 March 1935) is a former Irish Fianna Fáil politician who served as Minister for Foreign Affairs from 1992 to 1993 and 1997 to 2000, Minister for Defence from 1993 to 1994 and June 1997 to October 1997, Minister for the Marine from 1993 to 1994, Minister of State at the Department of Foreign Affairs from 1977 to 1979 and Government Chief Whip and Minister of State at the Department of Defence from 1970 to 1973. He served as a Teachta Dála (TD) from 1965 to 2002.[2]

David Andrews
David Andrews (politician).jpg
Minister for Foreign Affairs
In office
8 October 1997 – 27 January 2000
TaoiseachBertie Ahern
Preceded byRay Burke
Succeeded byBrian Cowen
In office
11 February 1992 – 12 January 1993
TaoiseachAlbert Reynolds
Preceded byGerry Collins
Succeeded byDick Spring
Minister for Defence
In office
26 June 1997 – 8 October 1997
TaoiseachBertie Ahern
Preceded bySeán Barrett
Succeeded byMichael Smith
In office
12 January 1993 – 15 December 1994
TaoiseachAlbert Reynolds
Preceded byJohn Wilson
Succeeded byHugh Coveney
Minister for the Marine
In office
12 January 1993 – 15 December 1994
TaoiseachAlbert Reynolds
Preceded byMichael Smith
Succeeded byHugh Coveney
Minister of State/Parliamentary Secretary
1979Justice
1977–1979Foreign Affairs
1970–1973Government Chief Whip
1970–1973Defence
Teachta Dála
In office
June 1977 – May 2002
ConstituencyDún Laoghaire
In office
April 1965 – June 1977
ConstituencyDún Laoghaire and Rathdown
Personal details
Born (1935-03-15) 15 March 1935 (age 87)
Clonskeagh, Dublin, Ireland
Political partyFianna Fáil
Spouse
Rita Andrews
(m. 1963)
Children5, including Barry and David[1]
Parent
Relatives
Alma mater

Andrews was first elected to Dáil Éireann at the 1965 general election as a Fianna Fáil TD for the Dún Laoghaire and Rathdown constituency.[3] In May 1970, in a reshuffle following the Arms Crisis, he was appointed as Parliamentary Secretary to the Taoiseach,[2] with special responsibility as Chief Whip, and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Defence.[4] He served until Fianna Fáil left office in 1973.

Following the 1977 general election, Fianna Fáil were back in office and Jack Lynch appointed Andrews as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Foreign Affairs.[5][2] In the 1979 Fianna Fáil leadership election Andrews supported George Colley,[6] the favoured candidate of the existing leadership. However, Charles Haughey, in a very close vote, was elected party leader and Taoiseach.

Andrews was confined to the backbenches during Haughey's thirteen-year period as leader. During this period he maintained his legal practice and campaigned for the Guildford Four, the Birmingham Six, and Brian Keenan. He remained a vocal critic of Haughey during this period.[6] After the Progressive Democrats were founded in 1985 Andrews considered joining the new party.[6] In February 1992, Albert Reynolds succeeded Haughey as Taoiseach, and Andrews was appointed as Minister for Foreign Affairs. In January 1993, following the formation of a coalition with the Labour Party, Andrews was appointed as Minister for Defence and Minister for the Marine. He served until this government fell in December 1994.

After the 1997 general election, Fianna Fáil returned to office in coalition with the Progressive Democrats, with Bertie Ahern as Taoiseach. Andrews was first appointed Minister for Defence;[7] later that year, after the resignation of Ray Burke, he was appointed as Minister for Foreign Affairs.[2][8] His period as Foreign Minister was successful regarding the Northern Ireland peace talks.[9] In April 1998, the Good Friday Agreement was signed and was later approved in referendums in the Ireland and Northern Ireland. In 1999, Ireland joined the Partnership for Peace project. Andrews stepped down as Minister for Foreign Affairs in January 2000.[10][11]

He retired from politics at the 2002 general election, and his son Barry was elected for the Dún Laoghaire constituency. His other son David Andrews, Jnr is a comedian who works under the stage name of David McSavage. His brother Niall Andrews was a TD and MEP. On retirement from politics, he was appointed Chairman of the insurance company, MGM International.[citation needed]

In May 2000, he was appointed to the non-executive position as Chairman of the Irish Red Cross Society, serving in that position until 2009.[12][13]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Siblings: Barry Andrews and David McSavage". The Irish Times. 12 February 2005. Archived from the original on 22 December 2019. Retrieved 8 November 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d "David Andrews". Oireachtas Members Database. Archived from the original on 7 November 2018. Retrieved 15 January 2011.
  3. ^ "David Andrews". ElectionsIreland.org. Archived from the original on 2 August 2018. Retrieved 15 January 2011.
  4. ^ "Statement by the Taoiseach – Dáil Éireann (19th Dáil)". Houses of the Oireachtas. 8 March 1972. Retrieved 8 February 2020.
  5. ^ "Ceapachain mar Airí agus Rúnaí Parlaiminte – Dáil Éireann (21st Dáil)". Houses of the Oireachtas. 6 July 1977. Archived from the original on 18 December 2020. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  6. ^ a b c Kingstown Republican. New Island. 2007.
  7. ^ "Appointment of Members of Government and Ministers of State – Dáil Éireann (28th Dáil)". Houses of the Oireachtas. 9 July 1997. Archived from the original on 28 October 2020. Retrieved 12 January 2020.
  8. ^ "Appointment of Member of Government – Dáil Éireann (28th Dáil)". Houses of the Oireachtas. 9 October 1997. Archived from the original on 2 November 2019. Retrieved 28 March 2020.
  9. ^ "Where Are They Now: David Andrews". Irish Independent. 9 November 2011. Archived from the original on 18 October 2016. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  10. ^ "Nomination of Member of Government: Motion – Dáil Éireann (28th Dáil)". Houses of the Oireachtas. 27 January 2000. Archived from the original on 15 August 2019. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  11. ^ "Andrews to resign from cabinet on Wednesday". RTÉ News. 21 January 2000. Retrieved 1 February 2010.
  12. ^ "Andrews to retire as Red Cross chairman". RTÉ News. 17 November 2009. Archived from the original on 4 February 2010. Retrieved 1 February 2010.
  13. ^ "Dáil debate on reform of the Irish Red Cross". KildareStreet.com. 15 December 2010. Archived from the original on 13 July 2011. Retrieved 23 February 2011.
Political offices
Preceded by Government Chief Whip
1970–1973
Succeeded by
Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Defence
1970–1973
New office Minister of State at the Department of Foreign Affairs
1977–1979
Office abolished
Preceded by Minister for Foreign Affairs
1992–1993
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Defence
1993–1994
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for the Marine
1993–1994
Preceded by Minister for Defence
1997
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister for Foreign Affairs
1997–2000
Succeeded by