Christopher Dark (born Alfred Francis DeLeo, April 21, 1920 – October 10, 1971) was an American actor, best remembered as a character actor for his many starring roles in the 1950's and 60's. He graduated from Cornell University, and did post graduate work at Columbia University. He served as an army medic in the Philippines during WWII, and received honors. He began his career in theater in NY, and then moved to Hollywood in 1952. He was a member of the Foreign Film Committee for SAG for most of his career. As well as acting, he also wrote many scripts, including collaborations with Ida Lupino and Christopher Cary, two close friends and others.

Christopher Dark
Born
Alfred Francis DeLeo

(1920-04-21)April 21, 1920
DiedOctober 10, 1971(1971-10-10) (aged 51)
Resting placeHoly Cross Cemetery, Culver City, California, U.S.
OccupationActor, Writer
Years active1946–1971
Spouse(s)Eleanor Dark (married 1948–1971, his death). Eleanor served for the last two years of WWII in London for the Office of War Information, working for its Director, writer Robert Sherwood. Eleanor worked on Broadway after the war with Garson Kanin, and later for Ben Silberstein, owner of the Beverly Hills Hotel, finishing her 23 years there as a member of their Board of Directors.
ChildrenPamela DeLeo, born Dec. 1951

BiographyEdit

Born in New York, Dark died in Hollywood, California, from a heart attack.

In 1954, Dark played in an episode of the TV series, The Lone Ranger, entitled Texas Draw. In 1955, Dark was cast in an episode of the NBC western anthology series, Frontier, hosted by Walter Coy. Dark guest starred on two episodes of the ABC religion anthology series, Crossroads, as Irving Green in "The Unholy Trio (1955) and as Frank Corletto in "Circus Priest" (1956).

In 1956, Dark appeared in two episodes of Science Fiction Theatre, S2E6 "Bullet Proof," and S2E9 "End of Tomorrow."

In 1957 and 1958, Dark guest starred in two episodes of David Janssen's crime drama, Richard Diamond, Private Detective, as the lead in "The Mickey Farmer Case" and then as Rudi Trekhala in "Widow's Walk". About this time, he also guest starred on John Bromfield's crime drama, U.S. Marshal. In 1957, he played Sgt. Al Zavala in four episodes of the syndicated crime drama, Code 3, with Richard Travis in the lead role of assistant Sheriff Rodger Barnett.

In 1958, Dark appeared as Don Ramon in "Decoy" on the ABC/Warner Brothers western series, Colt .45, starring Wayde Preston. That same year, Dark played the main villain, William Swanson, in the episode "The Young Gun" in Robert Culp's western series, Trackdown.

In 1959, Dark guest starred in the first episode of NBC's Bonanza in "A Rose for Lotta". Besides the pilot, he would also guest star in other three episodes of the western series: "The Fear Merchants" (1960), "Calamity Over the Comstock" (1963) and "Showdown at Tahoe" (1967).

Dark appeared in 1959 as Juan Carlos Morita in the episode "Death of a Gunfighter" on CBS' "Have Gun Will Travel" and as Trevor Jackson in the episode "Reunion" of CBS's The Texan, starring Rory Calhoun; his fellow co-stars were Bethel Leslie and Robert F. Simon.[1]That same year, he was cast as Henri Gaspard in "Double Fee" of Steve McQueen's CBS western series, Wanted: Dead or Alive. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alcoa_Presents:_One_Step_Beyond March 22, 1960 One Step Beyond, The Clown. As Tom Regan. In 1960, Dark was cast with Richard Rust in the episode "An Hour to Kill" of the half-hour syndicated crime drama, The Brothers Brannagan, and he played a teacher falsely accused of murder in the Peter Gunn episode "Death Watch". Another 1960 role was that of Dante in "Talent for Danger" on the ABC adventure series, The Islanders, set in the South Pacific.

In 1960, he was cast as Miguel Avarado in the episode "Bandido" of the syndicated western series, Pony Express, starring Grant Sullivan. His fellow guest stars in the segment were Douglas Kennedy and Robert Ivers.[2]

In 1962 Dark appeared as Walt Gleason on The Virginian in the episode titled "The Accomplice."[citation needed]

Dark played the role of Pike in the three-part 1964 episode, "The Tenderfoot", of NBC's Disney's The Wonderful World of Color.[citation needed]

Dark also appeared in 1965 on the fourth season of Combat! as a German agent in the episode "9 Place Vendee".

In 1970 Dark appeared as Mort in the TV western "The Men From Shiloh" (the rebranded name of The Virginian) in the episode titled "Jenny."

FamilyEdit

Dark and his wife, Eleanor, were married from 1948 until his death. The couple had one child.[citation needed]

FilmographyEdit

Year Title Role Notes
1950 September Affair Passport Clerk Uncredited
1953 Raiders of the Seven Seas Pablo
1953 Loretta Young Show
1953 The Steel Lady Ibrahim
1954 Suddenly Bart Wheeler
1956 Diane Giancarlo
1956 World Without End Henry 'Hank' Jaffe
1956 Johnny Concho Walker
1957 The Halliday Brand Jivaro Burris
1957 Baby Face Nelson Jerry Uncredited
1958 Day of the Badman Rudy Hayes
1958 Wild Heritage Brazos - Trail Drive Cowhand
1959 The Rabbit Trap Gerry
1960 Gundown at Sandoval (archive footage)
1960 Platinum High School Vince Perley
1961 Gold of the Seven Saints Frank Uncredited
1962 How the West Was Won Poker Player with Cleve Uncredited
1963 Son of Flubber Police Captain / TV Broadcaster Voice, Uncredited
1965 None But the Brave Pvt. Searcy
1968 The Private Navy of Sgt. O'Farrell Pvt. George Strongbow
1971 Scandalous John Card Dealer

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "The Texan". Classic Television Archive. Archived from the original on 2012-04-08. Retrieved February 2, 2013.
  2. ^ "Pony Express". Classic Television Archives. Retrieved January 30, 2013.

External linksEdit