Douglas Kennedy (actor)

Douglas Richards Kennedy (September 14, 1915 – August 10, 1973) was an American supporting actor originally from New York City who appeared in more than 190 films between 1935 and 1973.

Douglas Kennedy
Douglas Kennedy in Gunsmoke.jpg
Kennedy in Gunsmoke (1960)
Born
Douglas Richards Kennedy

(1915-09-14)September 14, 1915
New York City, U.S.
DiedAugust 10, 1973(1973-08-10) (aged 57)
Resting placeNational Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu
Other namesDoug Kennedy
Keith Douglas
Alma materAmherst College
OccupationActor
Years active1935–1973
Spouse(s)Isabell Russell
Children1

Early yearsEdit

Kennedy was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Dion W. Kennedy.[1] He attended Deerfield Academy in Deerfield, Massachusetts, and afterwards graduated from Amherst College in Amherst, Massachusetts.[citation needed] He served in the U. S. Army from 1940 to 1945.[2]

CareerEdit

Kennedy was a character player and occasional leading man in Hollywood. Making his debut in 1935, he played a significant number of supporting roles and was able to secure contract-player status, first at Paramount Pictures and later at Warner Brothers.

His acting career was interrupted by World War II service as a major in the Signal Corps with the Office of Strategic Services and Army Intelligence. After that, he returned to films and played character roles, often western villains or territorial marshals, as well as isolated leads in low-budget pictures.[3]

Kennedy had a starring role in the syndicated series Steve Donovan, Western Marshal, with Eddy Waller as his sidekick, Rusty Lee. He was also one of the policemen who vanishes in the science fiction classic, Invaders from Mars.

He played the gunfighter William P. Longley in a 1954 episode of the syndicated television series Stories of the Century, starring and narrated by Jim Davis.[citation needed]

In the 1957 (season one) Perry Mason episode 'The Case of the Moth-Eaten Mink' he played the part of Det. Sgt. Jaffrey, eventually revealed as the murderer.

In 1958, he appeared as Steven Boles in the Perry Mason episode "The Case of The Lucky Loser". In 1960, he appeared as the murderer Lucky Sterling in Perry Mason episode 'The Case of the Wary Wildcatter'. In 1965, he appeared as Brady Duncan in the Perry Mason episode "The Case of the Fatal Fetish".

In 1958, Kennedy appeared in Jim Davis' second series, Rescue 8 in the episode "Calamity Coach". In the story line, rescuers Wes Cameron (Davis) and Skip Johnson (Lang Jeffries) work to rescue three actors on location when a stagecoach tumbles down a mountain.[citation needed]

On January 12, 1959, Kennedy appeared in the episode "Shadow of a Gunfighter" of the NBC western series The Restless Gun. He plays a former gunfighter, Cal Winfield, who is informed that Vint Bonner, (John Payne), is responsible for the death of Winfield's son. Cal Winfield then comes out of retirement to extract vengeance. Robert Fuller appears in the episode as Jim Winfield.[citation needed]

Kennedy played the role of Jay Brisco in the 1959 episode "Law West of the Pecos" of the ABC/Warner Brothers western series, Colt .45. Frank Ferguson portrayed Judge Roy Bean, and Lisa Gaye was cast as June Webster.[citation needed]

Later, Kennedy portrayed the sheriff, Fred Madden, of ABC's The Big Valley, with Barbara Stanwyck. He made his last appearance in 1973 in three episodes of CBS's Hawaii Five-O, with Jack Lord.

Personal life and deathEdit

Kennedy was married to Isabell Russell, and they had a son, Douglas Kennedy Jr.[4]

Kennedy died of cancer at the age of fifty-seven in Honolulu, Hawaii, where he had been for the shooting of Hawaii Five-O. He is interred at National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu.

Selected appearancesEdit

FilmsEdit

TV showsEdit

Career notesEdit

  1. ^ "Douglas Kennedy To Greet Mother". Valley Times. California, North Hollywood. December 6, 1947. p. 13. Retrieved June 17, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "TV Actor Douglas Kennedy Endures In Lawman Roles". The Evening Sun. Maryland, Baltimore. January 30, 1968. p. 14. Retrieved June 16, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ Katz, Ephraim (1990). The Film Encyclopedia (2nd ed.). New York: Perennial Library, Harper & Row Publishers. p. 1278. ISBN 0-06-092027-0.
  4. ^ "Douglas Kennedy, Actor, Father of New Son". Valley Times. California, North Hollywood. May 8, 1947. p. 2. Retrieved June 17, 2020 – via Newspapers.com.

External linksEdit