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Chiltern is one of four local government districts of Buckinghamshire in south central England. It is named after the Chiltern Hills on which the region sits.

Chiltern District
Chiltern shown within Buckinghamshire
Chiltern shown within Buckinghamshire
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Constituent countryEngland
RegionSouth East England
Non-metropolitan countyBuckinghamshire
StatusNon-metropolitan district
Admin HQAmersham
Incorporated1 April 1974
Government
 • TypeNon-metropolitan district council
 • BodyChiltern District Council
 • LeadershipLeader & Cabinet (Conservative)
 • MPsCheryl Gillan
Area
 • Total75.81 sq mi (196.35 km2)
Area rank162nd (of 317)
Population
 (mid-2018 est.)
 • Total95,927
 • Rank253rd (of 317)
 • Density1,300/sq mi (490/km2)
 • Ethnicity
91.4% White
5.5% Asian
0.6% Black
2.2% Mixed Race
0.3% Other
(2,011 Census)[1]
Time zoneUTC0 (GMT)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+1 (BST)
ONS code11UC (ONS)
E07000005 (GSS)
OS grid referenceSU965985
Websitewww.chiltern.gov.uk

The main towns in the district are Amersham and Chesham which are both served by London Underground's Metropolitan line.

Contents

HistoryEdit

It was formed on 1 April 1974 by the merger of the Chesham Urban District and surrounding Amersham Rural District. In 1988 it was the first Council to take up stock transfer.[2] 4,650 homes were transferred.[3]

ParishesEdit

Council affiliationEdit

As of 23 March 2018, the council composition is as follows:[4]

Party Number of councillors
Conservatives 38
Liberal Democrats 2

TransportEdit

Along with the Aylesbury Vale district, Chiltern contains no motorways except for a very small section of the M25 in the south-eastern corner. The major roads through the district are the A413 and the A404, the two meeting in Amersham. Railway services are provided by Chiltern Railways and London Underground's Metropolitan line. The Great Central Main Line carried traffic between London and Manchester until 1966, the section to Aylesbury is all that remains, and is now part of the London to Aylesbury Line. The railway stations in the district are; Great Missenden, Amersham, Chalfont and Latimer and Chesham, the furthest tube station from London.

Law and orderEdit

Police stations are in Amersham and Chesham. The Magistrates' Court in Amersham was closed with its jurisdiction reassigned but reopened as a Crown Court dealing with either-way and more serious alleged offences.

Home ownership and quality of rural lifeEdit

The district has the highest proportion of home ownership of the 18 local authorities in Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire: combining the social (housing association and local authority provided) and private rented sectors, Stevenage's returns recorded in 2011 that its rented sector comprised 33.2% of its housing, whereas 10.0% of Chiltern's residents rented their homes.

In May 2008, the district was assessed by Bank of Scotland, Halifax division as having the best rural quality of life anywhere in Britain.[5]

Form of home ownership in Beds, Bucks and Herts compared[6]
Local Authority Owned Owned with a loan Socially rented Privately rented Other
Chiltern 41.1 35.8 1.8 8.2 1
South Bucks 38.1 35.3 12.3 10 1.4
St Albans 34.6 38.2 8.5 12.6 1.1
Three Rivers 34.1 38.6 4.8 9.3 1
Broxbourne 32.6 40.4 2.9 10.4 0.8
Wycombe 32.3 37.4 8.5 13.1 1.4
East Hertfordshire 32.1 39.7 2 12.2 1.4
Central Bedfordshire 31.6 40.9 5.2 10.5 1.1
Bedford 31.4 34.3 1.8 14.6 1.3
Hertsmere 31.4 36.2 1.9 11.3 1.2
Aylesbury Vale 31.1 40.5 3.4 11.7 1.3
North Hertfordshire 30.3 35.3 7.1 12.1 1.1
Dacorum 29.1 35.7 17.4 10.9 0.9
Welwyn Hatfield 26.5 30.8 19.9 12.7 1.3
Luton 25.1 35.1 10.7 21.3 1
Watford 24.4 37.2 4 18.9 0.8
Stevenage 22.2 36.1 22.8 10.4 0.7
Milton Keynes 21.5 36.3 11 16.2 0.9

Energy consumptionEdit

In May 2006, a report commissioned by British Gas[7] showed that housing in Chiltern produced the 4th highest average carbon emissions in the country at 7,421 kg of carbon dioxide per dwelling.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 2011 Census: KS201EW Ethnic group, local authorities in England and Wales, Accessed 28 February 2013
  2. ^ "Transfers - Large Scale Voluntary Transfers (LSVT)". The Hidden History of Tenants. Leeds Tenants Federation. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 17 September 2015.
  3. ^ Hetherington, Peter. "Voluntary transfer for social housing celebrates 10 years". Guardian. Guardian. Retrieved 17 September 2015.
  4. ^ "Council and Democracy". isa.chiltern.gov.uk. United Kingdom. 2018-03-23. Retrieved 2018-03-23.CS1 maint: others (link)
  5. ^ HBOS quality of life survey Archived 2008-06-27 at the Wayback Machine 5 May 2008. Retrieved 2015-01-28.
  6. ^ [1]Office for National Statistics 2011 Census Key Statistics: Tenure. Shared ownership forms the small remainder of each proportion.
  7. ^ British Gas news Archived 2008-06-26 at the Wayback Machine

External linksEdit