Clarence Elijah "Chief" Boston[1] (April 13, 1917 – May 4, 2002) was an American football player, college football coach—most notably at the University of New Hampshire—and United States Army officer.

Chief Boston
Clarence Elijah Boston.png
Boston in The Granite yearbook of New Hampshire, during the 1949 season
Biographical details
BornApril 13, 1917
Providence, Rhode Island
DiedMay 4, 2002(2002-05-04) (aged 85)
Nashville, Indiana
Alma materHarvard (1939)
Playing career
1936–1938Harvard
Position(s)Quarterback[a] / Kicker[1]
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1939University School, Ohio (HS)
1940–1941Harvard (freshmen)
1946–1947Harvard (junior varsity)
1948Army (backfield)
1949–1964New Hampshire
Head coaching record
Overall60–57–10
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
4x Yankee Conference (1950, 1953, 1954, 1962)
Awards
Bronze Star, Legion of Merit (U.S. Army)

Early yearsEdit

Boston was born in Providence, Rhode Island, graduated from Moses Brown School there, and attended Harvard.[2] His father, a newspaper reporter, was also nicknamed "Chief", as his father had been the chief of police in Woonsocket, Rhode Island.[3] At Harvard, Boston competed in wrestling, baseball, and football.[2] He was a champion wrestler, and graduated from Harvard in 1939.[2]

Coaching careerEdit

Boston coached high school football at University School near Cleveland,[4] before returning to Harvard in 1940 as coach of the freshman football team.[5] After coaching football for two seasons, and also coaching wrestling, Boston entered the United States Army in February 1942.[6] Boston served in the Third Army, commanded by George S. Patton, and received a Bronze Star and the Legion of Merit,[2] while rising to the rank of major.[7] Boston returned to Harvard in 1946, coaching the junior varsity football team and wrestling.[8] In May 1948, he was named as backfield coach for Army, under head coach Earl Blaik.[9]

In March 1949, Boston was named head coach of the New Hampshire Wildcats, succeeding Bill Glassford, who had resigned to coach Nebraska.[10] Boston coached the Wildcats from 1949 to 1964, compiling a record of 60–57–10.[11] During his 16 seasons with New Hampshire, the Wildcats won four Yankee Conference titles,[12] and in 1962, he was named New England small college coach of the year by the Boston Football Writers Association.[13] He resigned in January 1965, after the team had gone a combined 3–12–1 during the 1963 and 1964 seasons.[12]

Personal lifeEdit

Boston was inducted to the Harvard Varsity Club hall of fame in 1971,[1] and the University of New Hampshire athletic hall of fame in 1995.[14] He remained active in the Army Reserve, holding the rank of lieutenant colonel in the 1960s while serving as executive officer of the 304th Infantry Regiment based in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.[15] Boston and his wife, Mary, had two daughters and a son.[2] Boston died in May 2002 at his home in Nashville, Indiana, and was buried at Greenlawn Cemetery there.[2]

Head coaching recordEdit

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
New Hampshire Wildcats (Yankee Conference) (1949–1964)
1949 New Hampshire 4–4 1–3 5th
1950 New Hampshire 8–0 4–0 1st
1951 New Hampshire 5–2–1 1–2–1 4th
1952 New Hampshire 3–4–1 0–4 6th
1953 New Hampshire 6–2 3–1 T–1st
1954 New Hampshire 7–1 4–0 1st
1955 New Hampshire 2–4–2 1–1–2 T–3rd
1956 New Hampshire 3–4–1 2–1–1 3rd
1957 New Hampshire 0–7–1 0–3–1 6th
1958 New Hampshire 2–6 0–4 6th
1959 New Hampshire 3–3–2 1–2–1 T–4th
1960 New Hampshire 4–3 2–2 4th
1961 New Hampshire 3–5 1–3 4th
1962 New Hampshire 7–0–1 4–0–1 1st
1963 New Hampshire 2–6 2–3 3rd
1964 New Hampshire 1–6–1 0–4–1 6th
New Hampshire: 60–57–10 26–33–8
Total: 60–57–10
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

NotesEdit

  1. ^ During the era that Boston played, the quarterback position was a "blocking back".

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Clarence Elijah Boston '39". harvardvarsityclub.org. Retrieved December 2, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Clarence E. Boston, Nashville". The Republic. Columbus, Indiana. May 8, 2002. p. 11. Retrieved December 2, 2019.
  3. ^ ""Chief" Boston Dead; Newsman Was Father of Harvard Grid Star". The Boston Globe. August 26, 1941. p. 17. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Boston, Daughters, Harvard Grid Stars, Get Coaching Jobs". The Boston Globe. AP. May 9, 1939. p. 21. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  5. ^ ""Chief" Boston Returns". The Cincinnati Enquirer. INS. March 13, 1940. p. 19. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  6. ^ "Coach Enters Service". The Berkshire Eagle. Pittsfield, Massachusetts. AP. February 12, 1942. p. 22. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "Bonne Chance". The Boston Globe. January 15, 1946. p. 22. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "40-Man Wrestling Squad at Harvard". The Boston Globe. December 1, 1946. p. 33. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  9. ^ Miller, Vern (May 11, 1948). ""Chief" Boston to Coach Army Varsity Backfield". The Boston Globe. p. 11. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  10. ^ ""Chief" Boston Named Head Grid Coach at N.H." The Boston Globe. UP. March 8, 1949. p. 32. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Official Site of UNH Athletics-Legendary UNH Football Coach Clarence E. "Chief" Boston Dies at Age 85". New Hampshire Wildcats. May 6, 2002. Retrieved March 17, 2019.
  12. ^ a b "Boston Quitting As N.H. Grid Coach". The Boston Globe. UPI. January 21, 1965. p. 39. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  13. ^ Birtwell, Roger (December 4, 1962). "Spiezio Wins Senior Award". The Boston Globe. p. 25. Retrieved December 3, 2019 – via newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "UNH Wildcats - Hall of Fame". unhwildcats.com. December 1, 2019.
  15. ^ "Self Discipline Important Says Lt. Col. Boston". Leavenworth Times. Leavenworth, Kansas. May 8, 1963. p. 8. Retrieved December 2, 2019 – via newspapers.com.

External linksEdit