Canaan, Connecticut

Canaan is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 1,234 at the 2010 census,[1] up from 1,081 at the 2000 census. The town of Canaan is often referred to locally by the name of its principal settlement, Falls Village.[2]

Canaan, Connecticut
Official seal of Canaan, Connecticut
Seal
Location in Litchfield County, Connecticut
Location in Litchfield County, Connecticut
Coordinates: 41°57′42″N 73°18′30″W / 41.96167°N 73.30833°W / 41.96167; -73.30833Coordinates: 41°57′42″N 73°18′30″W / 41.96167°N 73.30833°W / 41.96167; -73.30833
Country United States
U.S. state Connecticut
CountyLitchfield
RegionNorthwest Hills
Incorporated1739
Government
 • TypeSelectman-town meeting
 • First selectmanPatricia Allyn Mechare (D)
 • SelectmanCharles H. Lewis (D)
 • SelectmanGreg Marlowe (R)
Area
 • Total33.24 sq mi (86.08 km2)
 • Land32.91 sq mi (85.24 km2)
 • Water0.32 sq mi (0.84 km2)
Elevation
656 ft (200 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total1,234
 • Density38/sq mi (14.5/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP code
06031
Area code(s)860 Exchange: 824
FIPS code09-10940
GNIS feature ID0213402
Websitewww.canaanfallsvillage.org

GeographyEdit

Canaan is in northwestern Litchfield County; it is bordered to the north by the town of North Canaan, to the east by Norfolk, to the south by Cornwall, and to the west, across the Housatonic River, by Salisbury. It is 17 miles (27 km) northwest of Torrington, 46 miles (74 km) north of Danbury, and 17 miles (27 km) south of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town of Canaan has a total area of 33.2 square miles (86.1 km2), of which 32.9 square miles (85.2 km2) are land and 0.3 square miles (0.8 km2), or 0.97%, are water.[1]

Principal communitiesEdit

HistoryEdit

The town was incorporated in 1739. The name "Canaan" is derived from Hebrew.[3]

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
18202,332
18502,627
18601,408−46.4%
18701,257−10.7%
18801,157−8.0%
1890970−16.2%
1900820−15.5%
1910702−14.4%
1920561−20.1%
19305650.7%
1940555−1.8%
195070827.6%
196079011.6%
197093117.8%
19801,0027.6%
19901,0575.5%
20001,0812.3%
20101,23414.2%
2014 (est.)1,195[4]−3.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]

As of the census[6] of 2000, there were 1,081 people, 445 households, and 298 families residing in the town. The population density was 32.8 people per square mile (12.7/km2). There were 610 housing units at an average density of 18.5 per square mile (7.1/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 97.04% White, 1.48% Black or African American, 0.19% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 0.37% from other races, and 0.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 0.37% of the population.

There were 445 households, out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.8% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 27.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.97.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 23.6% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 28.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.6 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $54,688, and the median income for a family was $62,500. Males had a median income of $40,438 versus $29,219 for females. The per capita income for the town was $35,841. About 3.0% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.6% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.

Voter registration and party enrollment as of October 29, 2019[7]
Party Active voters Inactive voters Total voters Percentage
Republican 150 26 176 21.86%
Democratic 297 20 317 39.38%
Unaffiliated 258 50 308 38.26%
Minor Parties 4 0 4 0.50%
Total 709 96 805 100%
Presidential Election Results[8][9]
Year Democratic Republican Third Parties
2020 66.7% 437 31.9% 209 1.4% 9
2016 60.3% 357 34.3% 203 5.4% 32
2012 63.4% 384 34.7% 210 1.9% 12
2008 67.7% 429 29.8% 189 2.5% 16
2004 61.1% 378 35.4% 219 3.5% 22
2000 49.1% 288 35.9% 211 15.0% 88
1996 50.8% 302 30.3% 180 18.9% 112
1992 41.2% 237 33.4% 192 25.4% 146
1988 46.3% 241 52.6% 274 1.1% 6
1984 28.2% 151 71.0% 380 0.8% 4
1980 30.4% 153 54.6% 275 15.0% 76
1976 36.4% 170 61.2% 289 2.4% 8
1972 28.8% 146 70.6% 358 0.6% 3
1968 32.4% 140 64.4% 278 3.2% 14
1964 47.1% 202 52.9% 227 0.00% 0
1960 20.7% 89 79.3% 341 0.00% 0
1956 16.4% 68 83.6% 346 0.00% 0

EducationEdit

Canaan is a member of Regional School District 1, which also includes the towns of Cornwall, Kent, North Canaan, Salisbury, and Sharon. Public school students attend Lee H. Kellogg School for grades K-8, and Housatonic Valley Regional High School for grades 9-12.

Notable peopleEdit

TransportationEdit

The town is served by U.S. Route 7, Route 63, and Route 126. US 7 leads north into Massachusetts and south to Danbury, while Route 63 leads southeast to Litchfield. Route 126 is a local road that passes through the center of Falls Village and runs north along the Housatonic River.

PicturesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Census Summary File 1 (G001), Canaan town, Litchfield County, Connecticut". American FactFinder. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  2. ^ Early Historical Highlights of the Town of Canaan (Commonly Known As Falls Village) Archived April 5, 2009, at the Wayback Machine, Town of Canaan website
  3. ^ The Connecticut Magazine: An Illustrated Monthly. Connecticut Magazine Company. 1903. p. 331.
  4. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Archived from the original on 2015-05-23. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  5. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  6. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 29, 2019" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State.
  8. ^ "General Election Statements of Vote, 1922 – Current". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved December 19, 2020.
  9. ^ "Election Night Reporting". CT Secretary of State. Retrieved December 19, 2020.
  10. ^ "Steve Blass". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved May 23, 2014.
  11. ^ "Judson Philips, 85, Author, Dies". New York Times. March 9, 1989. Retrieved May 23, 2014.
  12. ^ "Pane-Joyce Genealogy". Clark University. Archived from the original on 2010-06-25. Retrieved 2010-05-30.
  13. ^ "Catherine Roraback". Connecticut Women's Hall of Fame. Retrieved May 23, 2014.
  14. ^ Lewis Cass Aldrich, ed. (1891). HISTORY OF Franklin AND Grand Isle Counties VERMONT. Syracuse, N Y.: D. Mason & Co. pp. 225–226.

External linksEdit