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Bonners Ferry is a city in and the county seat of Boundary County, Idaho, United States.[4] The population was 2,543 at the 2010 census.

Bonners Ferry
Bonner's Ferry and the Kootenai River
Bonner's Ferry and the Kootenai River
Location of Bonners Ferry in Boundary County, Idaho.
Location of Bonners Ferry in Boundary County, Idaho.
Bonners Ferry is located in the United States
Bonners Ferry
Bonners Ferry
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 48°41′32″N 116°19′03″W / 48.69222°N 116.31750°W / 48.69222; -116.31750Coordinates: 48°41′32″N 116°19′03″W / 48.69222°N 116.31750°W / 48.69222; -116.31750
CountryUnited States
StateIdaho
CountyBoundary
Area
 • Total2.51 sq mi (6.50 km2)
 • Land2.35 sq mi (6.10 km2)
 • Water0.15 sq mi (0.40 km2)
Elevation
1,896 ft (578 m)
Population
 • Total2,543
 • Estimate 
(2016)[3]
2,564
 • Density1,089.21/sq mi (420.61/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific (PST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
83805
Area code(s)208
FIPS code16-09370
GNIS feature ID0396163
Websitebonnersferry.id.gov

HistoryEdit

When gold was discovered in the East Kootenays of British Columbia in 1863, thousands of prospectors from all over the West surged northward over a route that became known as the Wildhorse Trail. Edwin Bonner, a merchant from Walla Walla, Washington, established a ferry in 1864 where the trail crossed the broad Kootenai River. In 1875, Richard Fry, and his Sinixt wife, Justine Su-steel Fry, leased the business,[5] but the location retained the name of the original founder and later became the town of Bonners Ferry.

Before the gold rush, only a few visitors had come to the region; one of the first was explorer David Thompson, a cartographer for the North West Company. Thompson and four fellow fur traders arrived in 1808 to trade with the Lower Kootenais. The local natives gave Thompson's party dried fish and moss bread. Thompson returned the next year and established a trading post on Lake Pend Oreille. He was followed in 1846 by Jesuit Priest Father DeSmet, a missionary to the Kootenai Tribe.[6]

The Oregon question was settled by Oregon Treaty of 1846 which established the 49th Parallel north as the boundary between the US and British North America. Government surveyors of the Boundary Commission came in 1858 to establish the border between the United States and British Columbia.[7]

Bonners Ferry in the 1880s flourished due to the mines in the north.[8] Entering service in 1883 the Norwegian-built steamer Midge transported passengers and freight between Bonners Ferry and British Columbia for 25 years. In 1892 The Great Northern Railway was built, followed by the Spokane International and the Kootenai Valley lines.[9]

The village of Bonners Ferry was formally established in 1893, along the south bank of the Kootenai River. Scattered along the valley and benchland were a few ranches and homesteads. Numerous mines were developed in the nearby mountains, including the Continental Mine in the Selkirks. The lumber industry also grew rapidly. Bonners Ferry, perched on stilts to avoid the inevitable spring floods, appeared to be a boom town.

Moving into the 20th century, the town became the center of a lumbering and farming community. The valley land was drained, levees were constructed and farms were cleared on the benches. The rich Kootenai Valley became known as the "Nile of the North," while the Bonners Ferry Lumber Company grew to be one of the world's largest lumber mills. The downtown took shape as brick buildings were constructed, replacing those on stilts. Completion of the Libby Dam in 1975 lessened the threat of serious flooding. Today, much of Main Street dates from this initial period of solid, permanent construction.

On September 20, 1974, the Kootenai Tribe, headed by chairwoman Amy Trice, declared war on the United States government. Their first act was to post soldiers on each end of the highway that runs through the town and they asked people, to pay a toll to drive through what had been the tribe's aboriginal land. The money would be used to house and care for elderly tribal members. Most tribes in the United States are forbidden to declare war on the U.S. government because of treaties, but the Kootenai Tribe never signed a treaty. The dispute resulted in the concession by the United States government and a land grant of 10.5 acres (42,000 m2) that is now the Kootenai Reservation.[10]

Bonners Ferry is 8 miles (13 km) from the site of the Ruby Ridge confrontation and siege in 1992, which occurred just outside Naples, Idaho.

In recent years, Mormon Fundamentalists from nearby Bountiful, British Columbia have established a presence in Bonners Ferry. They have brought with them the controversial practice of plural marriage.[11]

GeographyEdit

Bonners Ferry is located at 48°41′32″N 116°19′3″W / 48.69222°N 116.31750°W / 48.69222; -116.31750 (48.692110, −116.317626),[12] at an altitude of 1,896 feet (578 m).[13] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.61 square miles (6.76 km2), of which 2.44 square miles (6.32 km2) is land and 0.17 square miles (0.44 km2) is water.[14]

Bonners Ferry has a humid continental climate (Köppen Dfb/Dsb) with cold, snowy winters and dry summers with hot days and cool nights. It is almost warm enough to be classed as a Mediterranean climate or oceanic climate, and despite the cold, snow depths above 10 inches (0.25 m) occur only on 9 days in an average winter.

Climate data for Bonners Ferry (1971–2000)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 55
(13)
61
(16)
71
(22)
89
(32)
95
(35)
105
(41)
104
(40)
101
(38)
97
(36)
84
(29)
67
(19)
56
(13)
105
(41)
Average high °F (°C) 33.3
(0.7)
39.2
(4.0)
49.5
(9.7)
60.4
(15.8)
69.3
(20.7)
76.0
(24.4)
83.1
(28.4)
83.4
(28.6)
72.3
(22.4)
57.4
(14.1)
41.3
(5.2)
33.5
(0.8)
58.2
(14.6)
Average low °F (°C) 20.5
(−6.4)
24.3
(−4.3)
29.1
(−1.6)
34.7
(1.5)
41.6
(5.3)
47.6
(8.7)
50.7
(10.4)
50.0
(10.0)
41.9
(5.5)
34.1
(1.2)
28.6
(−1.9)
22.1
(−5.5)
35.4
(1.9)
Record low °F (°C) −29
(−34)
−25
(−32)
−12
(−24)
12
(−11)
17
(−8)
31
(−1)
32
(0)
28
(−2)
15
(−9)
11
(−12)
−13
(−25)
−33
(−36)
−33
(−36)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 2.70
(69)
1.77
(45)
1.49
(38)
1.42
(36)
1.76
(45)
1.62
(41)
1.02
(26)
1.07
(27)
1.16
(29)
1.61
(41)
3.03
(77)
2.91
(74)
21.56
(548)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 16.0
(41)
10.5
(27)
3.4
(8.6)
0.5
(1.3)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.5
(1.3)
9.2
(23)
22.0
(56)
62.1
(158.2)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 inch) 12.6 10.6 9.7 9.2 11.0 10.0 7.0 6.0 7.0 9.4 13.8 14.4 120.7
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 inch) 7.8 4.9 2.0 0.3 0 0 0 0 0 0.4 3.5 9.0 27.9
Source: NOAA (normals, 1971–2000)[15]

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1900349
19101,071206.9%
19201,23615.4%
19301,41814.7%
19401,345−5.1%
19501,77632.0%
19601,9218.2%
19701,909−0.6%
19801,906−0.2%
19902,19315.1%
20002,51514.7%
20102,5431.1%
Est. 20162,564[3]0.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[16]

2010 censusEdit

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 2,543 people, 1,117 households, and 631 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,042.2 inhabitants per square mile (402.4/km2). There were 1,254 housing units at an average density of 513.9 per square mile (198.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.3 percent White, 0.2 percent African American, 2.0 percent Native American, 0.6 percent Asian, 0.2 percent Pacific Islander, 0.5 percent from other races, and 2.2 percent from 2 or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.7 percent of the population.

There were 1,117 households of which 27.6 percent had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.1 percent were married couples living together, 12.5 percent had a female householder with no husband present, 4.8 percent had a male householder with no wife present, and 43.5 percent were non-families. 38.6 percent of all households were made up of individuals and 20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.91.

The median age in the city was 41.9 years. 23.7 percent of residents were under the age of 18; 7.5 percent were between the ages of 18 and 24; 21.9 percent were from 25 to 44; 27.4 percent were from 45 to 64; and 19.5 percent were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.0 percent male and 52.0 percent female.

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[17] of 2000, there were 2,515 people, 1,027 households, and 650 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,186.9 people per square mile (458.0/km²). There were 1,120 housing units at an average density of 528.5 per square mile (204.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.67 percent White, 0.04 percent African American, 1.59 percent Native American, 0.52 percent Asian, 1.31 percent from other races, and 0.87 percent from 2 or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.29 percent of the population.

There were 1,027 households out of which 31.7 percent had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.0 percent were married couples living together, 11.2 percent had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.7 percent were non-families. 32.9 percent of all households were made up of individuals and 15.5 percent had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city, the population was spread out with 26.9 percent under the age of 18, 8.2 percent from 18 to 24, 24.5 percent from 25 to 44, 21.3 percent from 45 to 64, and 19.1 percent who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $24,509, and the median income for a family was $35,237. Males had a median income of $28,558 versus $16,776 for females. The per capita income for the city was $13,343. About 17.3 percent of families and 20.0 percent of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.6 percent of those under age 18 and 10.9 percent of those age 65 or over.

TransportationEdit

Boundary County Airport is a county-owned, public-use airport located 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) northeast of the central business district of Bonners Ferry.[18]

Local mediaEdit

Bonners Ferry has been home to KBFI AM 1450 since 1983. It is owned by local licensee Radio Bonners Ferry, Inc, owned by Blue Sky Broadcasting, Inc. While licensed to Bonner's Ferry and its transmitter site is there, KBFI shares studios and offices with its sister stations (KSPT, KIBR, and KPND), at 327 Marion Avenue in Sandpoint, Idaho.

Bonners Ferry is served by a single newspaper, the weekly Bonners Ferry Herald, owned by Hagadone Publishing.[19] It is the official newspaper of record.[citation needed] The Kootenai Valley Times was a newspaper in Bonners Ferry, Idaho, covering local news, sports, business, jobs, and community events. Circulation was 1,559 copies.[20] In March 2018, KootenaiValleyTimes.com was launched to provide local news and information.[21]

SportsEdit

Bonners Ferry BJJ - Bonners Ferry BJJ was established in 2015 with the sole purpose of providing the highest level of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Self-Defense training in Boundary County. Stemming from a passion to help people better their lives and empower themselves, the school was created with the following goals in place: •Provide a safe, friendly, and educational training environment •Instill discipline in a way that builds true character and self-confidence •Teach people to embrace the mindset of respect all but fear none

Other languagesEdit

Some of the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho speak the city name in their language as Bonners Ferry (Ktunaxa: k̓akanmituk ʔa·kaq̓ǂaʔhaǂ, ʔaq̓anqmi[22]).

Notable peopleEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 26, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 18, 2012.
  3. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  5. ^ Pryce, Paula. Keeping the Lakes Way, ISBN 0-8020-8223-8, University of Toronto Press, pp. 166–7
  6. ^ Nisbet, Jack. "A place to build a House on". Sandpoint Magazine. Keokee Co. Publishing, inc. Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  7. ^ Dougherty, Phil. "The International Boundary Commission first meets on June 27, 1857". History Link. Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  8. ^ "Welcome to Bonners Ferry, Idaho". Sandpoint. Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  9. ^ "HISTORY OF BONNERS FERRY". Three Mile Corner. Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  10. ^ Kuglin, John (June 2, 1975). "Idaho Indians Reap Spoils Of War". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Retrieved April 26, 2011.
  11. ^ Morlin, Bill (February 15, 2009). "Polygamist sect on Idaho-B.C. border drawing new scrutiny". The Spokesman. Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  13. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Bonners Ferry, Idaho
  14. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 12, 2012. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  15. ^ "Climatography of the United States, No. 20, 1971–2000" (PDF). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved November 16, 2011.
  16. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  17. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  18. ^ FAA Airport Master Record for 65S (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective June 3, 2010.
  19. ^ "Bonners Ferry Herald".
  20. ^ "Kootenai Valley Times". Mondo Times. Mondo Code LLC. Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  21. ^ https://KootenaiValleyTimes.com
  22. ^ "FirstVoices: Nature / Environment – place names: words. Ktunaxa". Retrieved July 7, 2012.

External linksEdit