Average earnings index (horse racing)

Average earnings index (AEI) is a popular statistic used in North American Thoroughbred horse breeding. It is used to put the earnings of a breeding animal's progeny into proper perspective.[1]

MethodEdit

The average earnings index measures the earning power of a stallion or mare's offspring by comparing the average earnings of a given horse's progeny with all other runners of the same age that raced in the same country in a given period of time. The average is stated as a value of 1.00. The AEI is calculated for each year a horse has offspring racing and can be averaged for all years that horse has had first generation descendants on the track.[2]

The AEI can be used for additional comparisons, such as the composite AEI of a sire or damsire based on all of his progeny. Another way it is used is to compare stallions from one generation to the next, because it compensates for the changing value of currency over time.[1]

DevelopmentEdit

The AEI was developed in 1948 by Joe Estes of The Blood-Horse magazine. It originally could only be used to calculate numbers for sires and, beginning in the 1950s, broodmare sires. It was only with the addition of computer power beginning in the 1970s and 1980s that a full analysis of mares could be added to the equations and determine the AEI for various crosses.[3]

CriticismEdit

Although considered by some an industry standard,[3] the AEI is criticized as easily skewed by the influence of a single exceptional horse in a given year and favors horses that throw "durable types" of horses that have multiple starts in a given year, including at lower-level races.[4]

ExamplesEdit

A stallion's career AEI can be found by looking up the pedigree of any of their offspring in The Jockey Club's online pedigree database, equineline.com. The AEI figures for various leading American sires are:

As noted above, a stallion's career AEI can be found by looking up the pedigree of any of their offspring in The Jockey Club's online pedigree database, equineline.com. Sunday Silence's career AEI, according to the Jockey Club's online pedigree database (which includes all career earnings throughout the entire world), equineline.com, is 2.55.[16] Sunday Silence's career AEI, according to Racing Post, is 2.15. However Racing Post warns details of horses trained outside GB and Ireland may be incomplete.[17]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Gillies, Scot (April 21, 2009). "The five cross files". Blood Horse.
  2. ^ "Directory of Reference-Average Earnings Index". equineline.com. March 7, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mitchell, Frank (2004). Racehorse Breeding Theories. The Russell Meerdink Company, Ltd. p. 69. ISBN 9780929346755.
  4. ^ "The Language of Numbers". thoroughbredreview.com. June 22, 2014. Archived from the original on 2011-11-11.
  5. ^ "5-Cross Pedigree of Secretariat with stallion statistics for Bold Ruler". equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  6. ^ "Bold Ruler by Nasrullah". equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  7. ^ "Easy Goer by Alydar". equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  8. ^ "Ferdinand by Nijinsky II". www.equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  9. ^ "Citation by Bull Lea". www.equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  10. ^ "Nijinsky by Northern Dancer". www.equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  11. ^ "Danzig Connection by Danzig". www.equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  12. ^ "Fusaichi Pegasus by Mr. Prospector". equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  13. ^ "Tabasco Cat by Storm Cat". www.equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  14. ^ "Sunday Silence by Halo". www.equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  15. ^ "Mineshaft by A.P. Indy". www.equineline.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017.
  16. ^ "Silent Name by Sunday Silence". www.equineline.com. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  17. ^ "Sunday Silence Stud Record". Racing Post. November 7, 2018. Retrieved November 7, 2018.