Aumsville, Oregon

Aumsville is a city in Marion County, Oregon, United States. The population was 3,584 at the 2010 census.[6] It is part of the Salem Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Aumsville, Oregon
Motto(s): 
"Home of the Corn Festival"
Location in Oregon
Location in Oregon
Coordinates: 44°50′41″N 122°52′17″W / 44.84472°N 122.87139°W / 44.84472; -122.87139Coordinates: 44°50′41″N 122°52′17″W / 44.84472°N 122.87139°W / 44.84472; -122.87139
CountryUnited States
StateOregon
CountyMarion
IncorporatedAugust 3, 1911
Government
 • MayorDerek Clevenger[1]
Area
 • Total1.13 sq mi (2.92 km2)
 • Land1.13 sq mi (2.92 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
366 ft (112 m)
Population
 • Total3,584
 • Estimate 
(2019)[4]
4,180
 • Density3,705.67/sq mi (1,430.61/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (Pacific)
ZIP code
97325
Area codes503 and 971
FIPS code41-03250[3]
GNIS feature ID1117091[5]
Websitewww.aumsville.us

HistoryEdit

Aumsville is on the site of the pioneer farm of Henry L. Turner, who named the settlement for his son-in-law, Amos M. Davis, more familiarly known as "Aumus", who had died on December 23, 1863. Aumsville was incorporated on August 3, 1911.[1][7]

On December 14, 2010, an EF2 tornado touched down in the center of Aumsville.[8] The winds destroyed homes and caused substantial damage to businesses and City Hall.[9]

GeographyEdit

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.02 square miles (2.64 km2), all of it land.[10]

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920171
1930153−10.5%
1950281
19603006.8%
197059096.7%
19801,432142.7%
19901,65015.2%
20003,00382.0%
20103,58419.3%
2019 (est.)4,180[4]16.6%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]

2010 censusEdit

As of the census of 2010, there were 3,584 people, 1,182 households, and 937 families living in the city. The population density was 3,513.7 inhabitants per square mile (1,356.6/km2). There were 1,231 housing units at an average density of 1,206.9 per square mile (466.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 84.3% White, 0.5% African American, 2.2% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 6.7% from other races, and 5.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.4% of the population.[3]

There were 1,182 households, of which 49.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.4% were married couples living together, 20.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 20.7% were non-families. 16.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.03 and the average family size was 3.33.[3]

The median age in the city was 30.4 years. 34.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.2% were from 25 to 44; 21.1% were from 45 to 64; and 8.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.2% male and 52.8% female.[3]

2000 censusEdit

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,003 people, 961 households, and 803 families living in the city. The population density was 3,792.5 people per square mile (1,467.7/km2). There were 1,024 housing units at an average density of 1,293.2 per square mile (500.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 86.75% White, 1.83% Native American, 0.47% Asian, 0.30% African American, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 6.06% from other races, and 4.43% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.39% of the population.[3]

There were 961 households, out of which 52.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.3% were married couples living together, 17.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.4% were non-families. 12.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.12 and the average family size was 3.37.[3]

In the city, the population was spread out, with 36.4% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 17.4% from 45 to 64, and 5.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.2 males.[3]

The median income for a household in the city was $40,704, and the median income for a family was $41,316. Males had a median income of $32,723 versus $24,514 for females. The per capita income for the city was $14,262. About 13.8% of families and 15.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.7% of those under age 18 and 11.1% of those age 65 or over.[3]

Annual cultural eventsEdit

The Aumsville Corn Festival is held in August.[12]

Parks and recreationEdit

Aumsville is home to the Brian Haney Memorial Skate Park.[13]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "Incorporated Cities: Aumsville". Oregon Blue Book. Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved December 16, 2010.
  2. ^ "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-21.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ 2010 U.S. Census[dead link]
  7. ^ "Marion County Oregon - Cities Histories". Marion County, Oregon. Archived from the original on April 6, 2009. Retrieved December 22, 2010.
  8. ^ "National Weather Service - NWS Portland". Wrh.noaa.gov. May 24, 2007. Retrieved March 16, 2012.
  9. ^ "Aumsville tornado: Homes and businesses destroyed by sudden, furious storm". OregonLive.com. December 14, 2010. Retrieved December 14, 2010.
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-12-21.
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  12. ^ "Aumsville City Hall". City of Aumsville. Retrieved December 22, 2010.
  13. ^ "Brian Haney Memorial Skatepark". skateoregon.com. Retrieved December 14, 2010.

External linksEdit