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Alex Kuznetsov (born February 5, 1987) is a retired American professional tennis player. He is currently the hitting partner of Maria Sharapova.

Alex Kuznetsov
Kuznetsov Al. WMQ14 (6) (14606959325).jpg
Country (sports) United States
ResidenceTampa, Florida, United States
Born (1987-02-05) February 5, 1987 (age 32)
Kiev, USSR (now Ukraine)
Height1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Turned pro2004
Retired2016
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money$909,591
Singles
Career record9–28
Career titles0
4 Challengers
Highest rankingNo. 120 (September 30, 2013)
Current rankingNo. 276 (June 8, 2015)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open2R (2007)
French Open1R (2013)
Wimbledon1R (2013, 2014)
US Open1R (2006, 2007)
Doubles
Career record9–14
Career titles0
Highest rankingNo. 78 (September 24, 2007)
Current rankingNo. 291 (July 17, 2016)
Last updated on: July 17, 2016.

Personal lifeEdit

Though born in Ukraine, his family moved to the United States when he was 3 years old, settling just outside Philadelphia. He resides in Tampa, Florida where he trains at Saddlebrook Resort Club. He trains with John Isner and Tim Smyczek. He is married and enjoys playing golf in his spare time.

Kuznetsov is not related to Russian tennis players Svetlana Kuznetsova or Andrey Kuznetsov.[1]

Tennis careerEdit

JuniorsEdit

Kuznetsov was coached by Jason Katzer during his youth. As a junior Kuznetsov compiled a singles win/loss record of 67-27 (50-21 in doubles), reaching a combined junior world ranking of No. 4 in July 2004.

Junior Slam results – Singles:

Australian Open: -
French Open: F (2004)
Wimbledon: 2R (2004)
US Open: 3R (2005)

Nike offered Alex a 1 million dollar sponsorship contract as soon as he turned pro which he accepted.

He was involved in a serious car accident soon after. Projected to take a full year to recover from breaking his femur due to his car accident, he returned to tennis just 6 months later after having a titanium rod inserted into his right thigh.

2006Edit

In July 2006 Alex played in the Comerica Challenger in Aptos, defeating Go Soeda for the 2006 singles title. At the 2006 US Open, he lost to 14th seed Tommy Haas.

2006 also saw Kuznetsov appear in the video game Top Spin 2 as an up-and-coming star.

2007Edit

Kuznetsov reached the second round of the 2007 Australian Open, defeating Australian Peter Luczak before losing to fellow American James Blake, 6–4, 6–1, 6–2. Kuznetsov gave Blake an early scare by breaking Blake's first two service games.

In April 2007, he reached his career-high singles ranking of World No. 158.

In the 2007 US Open he played doubles with American Jesse Levine. They won their first round match over Dominik Hrbatý of Slovakia and Harel Levy of Israel, 6–1, 6–4, and their second round match, upsetting 7th-seeded Frenchmen Arnaud Clément and Michaël Llodra 7–6(5), 6–4, before losing in the third round to 9th-seeded Czechs Lukáš Dlouhý and Pavel Vízner, 6–4, 7–5.

In December, Kuznetsov, Levine, and Wayne Odesnik were invited by the USTA to play off in a round-robin for the wild-card berth in the Australian Open.[2] Levine won the wild card.[3]

Singles performance timelineEdit

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A P Z# PO G F-S SF-B NMS NH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (Z#) Davis/Fed Cup Zonal Group (with number indication) or (PO) play-off; (G) gold, (F-S) silver or (SF-B) bronze Olympic medal; a (NMS) downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed)
To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated at the conclusion of a tournament or when the player's participation has ended.

Current through 2015 Australian Open.

Tournament 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A 2R Q2 A Q1 Q3 1R Q1 Q3 Q3 1–2
French Open A Q2 Q1 A A Q1 Q2 1R Q1 A 0–1
Wimbledon A Q2 Q1 A Q2 Q2 Q1 1R 1R 0–2
US Open 1R 1R Q3 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q3 Q1 2–3
Win–Loss 0–1 1–2 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 2–3 0–1 0–0 3–8
Career statistics
Titles–Finals 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0
Year End Ranking 223 180 344 198 250 169 224 142 182

Doubles performance timelineEdit

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A P Z# PO G F-S SF-B NMS NH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (Z#) Davis/Fed Cup Zonal Group (with number indication) or (PO) play-off; (G) gold, (F-S) silver or (SF-B) bronze Olympic medal; a (NMS) downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed)
To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated at the conclusion of a tournament or when the player's participation has ended.

Current till US Open.

Tournament 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2013 W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open 0-0
French Open 0–0
Wimbledon 1R 0–1
US Open 1R 2R 1R 3R 1R 1R 1R 3-7
Win–Loss 0–1 1–1 0–1 2–2 0–1 0–1 0–1 3–8
Career statistics
Titles–Finals 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–0

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://challengertennis.wordpress.com/2011/04/06/know-your-kuznetsovs-%E2%80%93-a-field-guide/
  2. ^ "Isner on outside looking in at Australian Open ... for now" ESPN, 12/11/07, accessed 12/13/07
  3. ^ "Madison Brengle and Jesse Levine Win Australian Open Wild Cards". United States Tennis Association. Retrieved March 28, 2016.

External linksEdit