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Alaska Anchorage Seawolves men's ice hockey

The Alaska Anchorage Seawolves men's ice hockey team is a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I college ice hockey program that represents the University of Alaska Anchorage. The Seawolves are a member of the Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA). They play at the Sullivan Arena in Anchorage, Alaska.[3]

Alaska Anchorage Seawolves
UniversityUniversity of Alaska Anchorage
ConferenceWCHA
First season1979–80
Head coachMatt Curley
2nd season, 3–28–3 (.132)
Alternate captain(s)Nils Rygaard, Cam Amantea, Nolan Nicholas, Eric Sinclair
ArenaWells Fargo Sports Complex
Capacity: 800[1]
LocationAnchorage, Alaska
ColorsGreen and Gold[2]
         
NCAA Tournament appearances
1990, 1991, 1992
Conference regular season championships
1987
Current uniform
WCHA-Uniform-UAA.png

Contents

HistoryEdit

UAA began its ice hockey program in 1979, playing 8 of its 31 games against Division II Alaska–Fairbanks (winning all) before beginning a full D-II schedule the following season. The Seawolves rose quickly in the Division II ranks, narrowly missing out on the NCAA tournament in 1984 but promoted the team to Division I that summer when the entire D-II division collapsed.[4]

Anchorage played as an independent for a year before being a founding member of the first west coast conference, the Great West Hockey Conference. The league was very short-lived, lasting only three seasons before the two non-Alaska schools dropped hockey entirely, but it did provide UAA with its first league title in 1987.[5] The Seawolves were once again without a conference in 1988–89, but a year later they posted their first 20-win season at the D-I level and were selected to the NCAA Tournament.

The Seawolves dropped both games to Lake Superior State but returned the following year after another 20-win campaign and this time they were able to win their first NCAA round, defeating the Boston College Eagles. 1991–92 provided UAA with its best record, with the team going 27–8–1 and garnering a third consecutive NCAA berth (the last such for UAA as of 2019). After one more winning season the Seawolves joined the Western Collegiate Hockey Association.

The stability of their new conference came as a double-edged sword, however, as the Seawolves would spend the next twenty years finishing with losing records. To make matters worse the team would lost both games in the opening round of the WCHA tournament most of the time and only twice could manage a First Round series win.

The college hockey world changed in 2013 when the Central Collegiate Hockey Association collapsed due to the formation of the Big Ten and the National Collegiate Hockey Conference.[6] This caused the WCHA to replace many of its departing members with weaker teams but even in the new WCHA UAA was still a bottom-half team. After making the conference semifinals the first season the Seawolves missed the playoffs each of the next five years.

Season-by-season results[7]Edit

Head CoachesEdit

Tenure Coach Years Record Pct.
1979–1996 Brush Christiansen 16 287–229–30 .553
1996–2001 Dean Talafous 5 50–108–22 .339
2001–2005 John Hill 4 39–89–21 .332
2005–2013 Dave Shyiak 8 80–177–33 .333
2013–2018 Matt Thomas 5 48–105–21 .336
2018–Present Matt Curley 1 3–28–3 .132
Totals 6 coaches 39 seasons 507-731-130 .418

As of completion of 2018–19 season. Records includes regular season and playoffs games.[8]

Statistical Leaders[9]Edit

Career points leadersEdit

Player Years GP G A Pts PIM
Dean Larson 1989–1992 63 137 200
Dennis Sorenson 1981–1984 70 127 197
Joey Hayse 1984–1987 76 93 169
Derek Donald 1989–1992 74 91 165
Peter McEnaney 1985–1988 54 107 161
Doug Spooner 1988–1991 75 73 148
Steve Bogoyevac 1989–1992 50 96 146
Rob Conn 1989–1991 76 70 146
Keith Morris 1990–1994 73 61 134
Mark Stitt 1992–1995 45 88 133

Career Goaltending LeadersEdit

GP = Games played; Min = Minutes played; W = Wins; L = Losses; T = Ties; GA = Goals against; SO = Shutouts; SV% = Save percentage; GAA = Goals against average

Minimum 30 games

Player Years GP Min W L T GA SO SV% GAA
Gregg Naumenko 1998–1999 30 1692 11 13 5 65 1 .920 2.31
Olivier Mantha 2014–2018 122 6973 28 77 14 350 3 .908 3.01
Chris Kamal 2010–2014 71 3850 21 39 2 198 5 .888 3.09
Rob Gunderson 2010–2014 82 4499 24 41 10 236 1 .886 3.15
Shaun Gravistin 1990–1993 48 2688 29 11 6 142 2 .883 3.17

Statistics current through the start of the 2018-19 season.

RosterEdit

As of August 18, 2019.[10]

No. S/P/C Player Class Pos Height Weight DoB Hometown Previous team NHL rights
1   Brandon Perrone Freshman G 5' 11" (1.8 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1998-10-26 Hauppauge, New York New Jersey (NAHL)
3   Andrew Lane Sophomore D 5' 9" (1.75 m) 162 lb (73 kg) 1997-02-19 Howell, Michigan Shreveport (NAHL)
4   Troy Robillard Freshman D 6' 3" (1.91 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 1998-10-12 Coquitlam, British Columbia Coquitlam (BCHL)
5   Brett Thorne Freshman D 6' 1" (1.85 m) 195 lb (88 kg) 1999-03-15 Bedford, Nova Scotia Carleton Place (CCHL)
6   Dante Fantauzzi Freshman D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 2000-05-01 Woodbridge, Ontario North York (OJHL)
7   Nolan Nicholas Senior D 5' 11" (1.8 m) 203 lb (92 kg) 1995-09-24 Thunder Bay, Ontario Sioux Falls (USHL)
8   Drayson Pears Sophomore D 6' 1" (1.85 m) 191 lb (87 kg) 1998-03-09 Shawnigan Lake, British Columbia Victoria (BCHL)
9   Nick Wicks Freshman F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1998-04-24 Delta, British Columbia Merritt (NAHL)
10   Tanner Schachle Sophomore F 6' 3" (1.91 m) 203 lb (92 kg) 1997-06-20 Wasilla, Alaska Fairbanks (NAHL)
11   Joe Sofo Junior F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 181 lb (82 kg) 1996-08-07 Sylvania, Ohio Coulee Region (NAHL)
13   Alex Frye Freshman F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1998-07-27 Clarkston, Michigan Jamestown (NAHL)
14   Jared Nash Sophomore F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 192 lb (87 kg) 1998-01-16 Stratford, Ontario Penticton (SJHL)
15   Taylor Lantz Freshman F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 165 lb (75 kg) 1998-06-21 Coleraine, Minnesota Minot (NAHL)
16   Zach Court Sophomore F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 183 lb (83 kg) 1997-01-04 Winnipeg, Manitoba Merritt (BCHL)
17   Zac Masson Junior F 6' 1" (1.85 m) 200 lb (91 kg) 1996-02-06 Newmarket, Ontario Langley (BCHL)
18   Tomi Hiekkavirta Senior D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 182 lb (83 kg) 1996-04-05 Helsinki, Finland HIFK U20 (Nuorten SM-liiga)
19   Drake Glover Junior F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 192 lb (87 kg) 1996-03-05 Anchorage, Alaska Lone Star (NAHL)
20   Corey Renwick Senior F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 192 lb (87 kg) 1995-03-28 Nanoose Bay, British Columbia Nanaimo (BCHL)
21   Mack Hancock Freshman F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 188 lb (85 kg) 1999-02-09 Kingston, Ontario Brooks (AJHL)
22   Carmine Buono Senior D 6' 2" (1.88 m) 203 lb (92 kg) 1997-02-22 Burnaby, British Columbia Powell River (BCHL)
23   Eric Sinclair Junior D 6' 0" (1.83 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1996-02-19 Kenora, Ontario Flin Flon (SJHL)
24   Luc Brown Senior F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 187 lb (85 kg) 1996-04-27 Napanee, Ontario Union (ECAC)
25   Marcus Mitchell Freshman F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 200 lb (91 kg) 1998-10-12 Kelowna, British Columbia Nanaimo (BCHL)
26   Aaron McPheters Junior D 5' 8" (1.73 m) 165 lb (75 kg) 1997-03-25 Anchorage, Alaska Fairbanks (NAHL)
27   David Trinkberger Senior D 6' 5" (1.96 m) 209 lb (95 kg) 1996-08-25 Landshut, Germany Sioux City (USHL)
28   Rylee St. Onge Freshman F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 195 lb (88 kg) 1998-04-22 St. Catharines, Ontario Des Moines (USHL)
29   Trey deGraaf Junior F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1996-01-30 Red Deer, Alberta Okotoks (AJHL)
30   Kris Carlson Junior G 6' 1" (1.85 m) 207 lb (94 kg) 1997-08-19 Centreville, Virginia New Jersey (USPHL)
39   Kristian Stead Junior G 6' 2" (1.88 m) 182 lb (83 kg) 1996-10-17 Merritt, British Columbia Nipawin (SJHL)
40   Brayden Camrud Freshman F 5' 9" (1.75 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1998-07-24 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Humboldt (SJHL)

Seawolves in the NHLEdit