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The Ajuran (Arabic: أجران) is a Somali clan. Group members largely inhabit Kenya as well as Ethiopia; considerable numbers are also found in Somalia.[1][2]

Ajuran (Ajuuraan) أجران
Languages
Somali
Religion
Islam (Sunni)
Related ethnic groups
Dir, Hawiye and other Samaale groups.

OverviewEdit

The Ajuran clan's origins are found in the Ajuran Sultante, a Somali Muslim sultanate that ruled over large parts of the Horn of Africa in the Middle Ages.[3][4][5] Today they largely live in Kenya, the North Eastern Province and the Somali region of Ethiopia, but also in Somalia.

The Ajuraan largely speak the Somali language, but a big portion also speak the Borana language.[6]

The Ajuran are descendants of Alama who in turn is a son of Bal'ad who traces descent from Harmalle Samaale.

HistoryEdit

The Ajuran clan established the Garen Dynasty that ruled both Mogadishu Sultanate and Ajuran Empire during the Middle Ages. During the early modern period, the Garen Dynasty survived from the Ajuran state disintegrated and established the Kelafo Sultanate that ruled large parts of the Somali region modern-day Ethiopia. They were eventually weakened due to the constant harassment from the Ethiopian Empire and the Italian Empire. They were later driven out by the encroaching Ogaden tribe and the survivors fled to Kenya.

Clan TreeEdit

This Clan Tree is based on "Identities on the Move: Clanship and Pastoralism in Northern Kenya" by Gunther Schlee.[7]

-Samaale

  • Harmalle
    • Bal'ad
      • Alama
        • Ajuran
          • Waaqle
          • Wallemugge
          • Saremugge
          • Tore
          • Dakhsore
          • Beidan
          • Badbeidan
          • Sanle

Notable Ajuran peopleEdit

  • Olol Dinle, Idhow Roble
  • Abdullahi Ibrahim [kabreta]-Kenyan politician.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Mohamed Haji Mukhtar (25 February 2003). Historical Dictionary of Somalia. Scarecrow Press. p. 35. ISBN 978-0-8108-6604-1.
  2. ^ Kenya National Assembly Official Record (Hansard). 1984-03-20.
  3. ^ Luling, Virginia (2002). Somali Sultanate: the Geledi city-state over 150 years. Transaction Publishers. p. 17. ISBN 978-1-874209-98-0.
  4. ^ Luc Cambrézy, Populations réfugiées: de l'exil au retour, p.316
  5. ^ Mukhtar, Mohamed Haji. "The Emergence and Role of Political Parties in the Inter-River Region of Somalia from 1947–1960". Ufahamu. 17 (2): 98.
  6. ^ Schlee, Günther; Watson, Elizabeth E. (2009-01-01). Changing Identifications and Alliances in North-East Africa. Berghahn Books. ISBN 9781845456030.
  7. ^ Schlee, Günther; Watson, Elizabeth E. (2009-01-01). Changing Identifications and Alliances in North-East Africa. Berghahn Books. ISBN 9781845456030.