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Aero Vodochody (commonly referred to as Aero) is a Czech (previous Czechoslovak) aircraft company. The factory and factory airport is located in Prague-East District, on the territory between Vodochody and Odolena Voda region. It was active from 1919, notable for producing the L-29 Delfin, L-39 Albatros, L-59 Super Albatros, and the L-159 Alca military light combat jet. From 1929[2] until 1951 Aero also made a range of small and medium-sized cars with two-stroke engines, and in 1946–47 it built the Škoda 150 truck under licence.

AERO Vodochody AEROSPACE a.s.
Akciová společnost
IndustryAerospace, arms Industry
PredecessorAero – továrna létadel
FoundedFebruary 25, 1919; 100 years ago (1919-02-25)
Headquarters,
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Dieter John (president and CEO)
ProductsAircraft, helicopter, aircraft parts
OwnersPenta Investments
Number of employees
1,683[1] (December 31, 2013)
Websitewww.aero.cz
Aero Vodochody L.159A ALCA – Advanced Light Combat Aircraft

After the fall of the communist government in Czechoslovakia (1989) and in the rest of Central Europe, the company lost a major portion of its main market in jet trainers. Sales of military aircraft declined in the early 1990s in Eastern Europe as well as in NATO countries where the entry of a new producer was obviously unwanted. Aero was controlled for several years, 1998 to 2004, by Boeing.[3]

At the end of October 2006 Aero Vodochody was privatized once again. A Czech-Slovak investment group Penta Investments bought it for roughly 3 billion CZK.[4][5]

Currently, Aero Vodochody produces the Sikorsky S-76, center wing box for the Alenia C27, door subassemblies for the Embraer 170 and Embraer 190, cockpit for the UH-60, gun bay doors for the F/A-18 Super Hornet, subassemblies and parts for the Airbus A320 family, fixed leading edge kits for the Boeing 767,[6] and the L-159 advanced light combat aircraft.[7]

Aero is also likely to upgrade the runway at its Vodochody Airport near Prague to international airport standards which would serve mainly the low-cost air-carriers and charter flights heading to Prague.[8]

AircraftEdit

Pre-World War IIEdit

Post World War IIEdit

  • Aero Ae-45 (1947-1961, twin-engine utility aircraft)
  • Aero Ae 50 (1949, prototype reconnaissance aircraft)
  • Aero Ae 53 (transport glider prototype)
  • Aero Ae-145 (1948, unbuilt larger 5-seat derivative of Ae-45 powered by two Walter Minor 6-III engines)
  • LB P-1 (1950, projected two-seat, twin-engine high speed trainer/courier aircraft based on the Hodek HK-101)
  • LB P-16 (1951, four engine 15-17 seat airliner project)
  • Aero Ae-145 (1955, Ae-45 re-engined with Walter M332 engines)
  • Aero Ae-148 (1949, twin engine 12-seat airliner project powered by Walter M446 V12 engines)
  • Aero Ae-245 (similar to Ae-145 but with a tailwheel)
  • Aero Ae-345 (Ae-45 airframe with Walter Minor 6-III engines)
  • Aero B-34 (1958, proposed attack aircraft to replace the Avia B-33)
  • Aero HC-2 Heli Baby (1954)
  • Aero L-60 Brigadýr (1955)
  • Aero L-260 (1960, L-60 powered by a Praga M-208D engine)
  • Aero L-29 Delfín (1963–1974)
  • Aero L-229 (unbuilt single-seat light attack version of L-29)
  • Aero L-260 (1970, 10-seat multi-purpose aircraft project)
  • Aero L-360 (1960, L-60 powered by an Ivchenko AI-14R engine)
  • Aero L-429 (internal designation for the L-29A "Akrobat")
  • Aero S-102 Czech licensed production of the Soviet Mikoyan-Gurevish MiG-15 fighter
  • Aero CS-102 Czech licensed production of the Soviet Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15UTI trainer
  • Aero S-103 Czech licensed production of the Soviet Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15bis fighter
  • Aero S-104 Czech licensed production of the Soviet Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-17PF fighter
  • Aero S-105 Czech licensed production of the Soviet Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-19S fighter
  • Aero S-106 (1960s) Czech production version of the Soviet Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-21F-13 fighter
  • Aero L-39 Albatros (1970–1997, military jet trainer)
  • Aero L-270 (1990, single engine utility aircraft)
  • Aero L-59 Super Albatros (1992–96, military jet trainer)
  • Aero Ae 270 Ibis (2000, civil utility aircraft, only four prototypes produced)
  • Sikorsky S-76 (2000–2015, Czech production of the parts of US helicopter)
  • Aero L-159 Alca (1997–2003 and 2016–2017, light attack aircraft and jet trainer)

In developmentEdit

  • Aero L-39NG (military jet trainer, first flight in 2015, serial production in 2019)[10]
  • Aero F/A-259 Striker (light multirole attack aircraft and successor to the L-159 Alca, made in cooperation with Israel and unveiled in July 2018)[11]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Aero Vodochody AEROSPACE a.s., Annual report 2013, page 54
  2. ^ Tuček 2017, p. 97.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 11, 2014. Retrieved August 2, 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 11, 2014. Retrieved August 2, 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 11, 2014. Retrieved August 2, 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 18, 2011. Retrieved October 27, 2010.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 8, 2010. Retrieved February 26, 2010.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on January 13, 2010. Retrieved December 31, 2009.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ Crook, John (1997). Air Transport the First Fifty Years. The Archive Photographs Series. Stroud: Chalford. p. 21. ISBN 0-7524-0790-2.
  10. ^ "Aero Vodochody begins component production for L-39NG jet trainer aircraft". Airforce Technology. July 23, 2017.
  11. ^ "Aero and IAI introduced multirole F/A-259 Striker aircraft". Aero.cz. July 19, 2018. Archived from the original on July 23, 2018. Retrieved July 19, 2018.

SourcesEdit

  • Tuček, Jan (2017). Auta první republiky 1918–1938 (in Czech). Prague: Grada Publishing. ISBN 978-80-271-0466-6.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit