Aditya Sinha is an Indian author and journalist. He has been a journalist since 1987, occupying positions such as Editor-in-Chief of The New Indian Express and DNA. He has reported on terrorism in Punjab, Kashmir and Assam and has also done reporting from Peshawar, Pakistan. He started out as a crime reporter in Delhi.[1][2][3]

Aditya Sinha
Aditya Sinha.jpg
NationalityIndian
OccupationJournalist, Author

Aditya Sinha has authored three books and co-authored three books. Among the books he has co-authored, includes "The Spy Chronicles: RAW, ISI and the Illusion of Peace", co-authored with a former R&AW chief, AS Dulat, and ISI chief, Asad Durrani.[4] His first work of fiction was "The CEO Who Lost His Head" published in 2017.[3][5]

Personal lifeEdit

Aditya Sinha was born in Bihar. He grew up outside of New York City. He has a bachelor's degree from Johns Hopkins University and MPhil from the School of Oriental Studies (SOAS). He lives in Gurgaon with his family.[6]

BooksEdit

AuthorEdit

  • The CEO Who Lost His Head. Pan Macmillan, 2017. ISBN 9781509859368
  • Death of Dreams: A Terrorist's Tale (2000). ISBN 9788172233907
  • Farooq Abdullah: Kashmir's Prodigal Son - A Biography. UBS Publishers' Distributors, 1996. ISBN 9788174760722[7]

Co-AuthorEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Author Biographies, Harper Collins Publishers India, A.S. Dulat with Sinha". Harper Collins. Archived from the original on 3 March 2019. Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  2. ^ Franko, Judy (14 April 2007). "Aditya Sinha appointed Editor-in-Chief of The New Indian Express". Exchange4media. Archived from the original on 2 March 2019. Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  3. ^ a b Karishma, Kuenzang (12 March 2017). "Journalist Aditya Sinha's first fiction work revolves around a murder mystery". India Today. Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  4. ^ Sushant, Singh (2 June 2018). "True Lies and Spies". The Indian Express. Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  5. ^ Kalbag, Sachin (18 February 2017). "A hatchet job". The Hindu. ISSN 0971-751X. Retrieved 2019-03-02.
  6. ^ https://www.linkedin.com/in/aditya-sinha-8940728/?originalSubdomain=in
  7. ^ Baweja, Harinder (31 December 1995). "Book review: Aditya Sinha's 'Farooq Abdullah: The Prodigal Son'". India Today. Archived from the original on 3 March 2019. Retrieved 2019-03-02.